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For moms of older US/HSers....re-assure me!

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Tell me my son will someday want to do something beside play on the computer.

I know this looks very much like another thread, but I need to hear someone tell me DS will (age 12, btw) develop new interests and a spark for learning.

I would also love to hear stories about how your child crammed many years of schooling into a much smaller amount of time when he/she was motivated and did fine. I am not saying Ds may do that, but knowing it is a possibility may help me to ease up.

How did you facilitate (for yourself) the letting go of worries - for example when they play computer day in and day out?

How do you help keep, maintain or ressurect a love of learning?

Kathy
post #2 of 9
"How do you help keep, maintain or ressurect a love of learning?"

Maybe that really isn't important.

How about starting to talk about what he's interested in doing in the future --being a vet, being a plumber, being an artist, etc. Maybe make it clear living in your basement at 25 isn't an option.

See what opportunities are available for exposure to the careers that spark his interest. In my area, there used to be the "explorers" that allowed for job shadowing and other exposure to certain kinds of careers.

Help him find a goal -- that the learning has purpose and meaning towards something larger that matters to him. For many people learning in itself is never a joyful act and that's okay. It is important that he learns what a useful tool learning can be for him.
post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post

I would also love to hear stories about how your child crammed many years of schooling into a much smaller amount of time when he/she was motivated and did fine. I am not saying Ds may do that, but knowing it is a possibility may help me to ease up.
Rain did that when she was thirteen and fourteen... she spent 3 months prepping for the SAT and inhaled the high points of K-12 math during that period ... spending maybe 5-10 hours a week on it?

Her writing trajectory was similar, although it actually took her a lot less time... she started writing at 10, and her second or third essay ever won her a full scholarship to a summer camp when she was 12. Before 10 she almost never wrote... like maybe a couple of birthday cards every year, and putting stuff on a shopping list.

Feel better?

Dar
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
A little, lol!

There is part of me that knows that, even if you never turn into a writer (for example) the ability to write an acceptable 5 paragraph essay is not going to take long to learn once the motivation strikes.

It is hard waiting though!

I also know no USers irl, so I feel a bit alone on this path.

Kathy
post #5 of 9
If it helps, my younger cousin (public school) did nothing but play video games for years. Currently, he's double majoring in web design and (I forget the term) designing video games!
post #6 of 9
i truly believe that video games can be addictive. i think they can trigger the same mechinism as a gambling addiction can.
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by hollycat View Post
i truly believe that video games can be addictive. i think they can trigger the same mechinism as a gambling addiction can.
If you are genetically inclined to addictive personalty, perhaps. I have seven kids who can play video games whenever they like, and I grew up being able to play whenever I liked, and none of us are addicted (meaning that we must play regularly to adjust our neurochemistry)
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post
Tell me my son will someday want to do something beside play on the computer.

I know this looks very much like another thread, but I need to hear someone tell me DS will (age 12, btw) develop new interests and a spark for learning.

I would also love to hear stories about how your child crammed many years of schooling into a much smaller amount of time when he/she was motivated and did fine. I am not saying Ds may do that, but knowing it is a possibility may help me to ease up.

How did you facilitate (for yourself) the letting go of worries - for example when they play computer day in and day out?

How do you help keep, maintain or ressurect a love of learning?

Kathy
He will develop new interests. When he's done with this one, then he'll want to move to something else. Perhaps something IN the game will guide him, perhaps he'll spend a few months laying around moaning about boredom (which is how my son segues into a new interest)

When he wanted to figure out how high his model rocket was going, he did probably half a years worth of geometry and trig in less than a week. He was sine and cosine all over the place. It was fun, and intense and I was relieved when it was OVER...because *I* don't particularly like math outside of breaking the code and figuring out the puzzle.

I kept digging up opportunities, offering outings, I played a LOT and learned a lot about his computer interests with him (so it didn't seem so much like he was just sitting there, I could see everything and understand how much work it was really taking)
post #9 of 9
Dd wanted to learn cursive around 9 just all of a sudden, and she did it. She's into Italian currently. I have no idea where she's going with it, but she's really focused and having a great time for now.

Ds just took his last state required test as a homeschooler. He spends most of his time reading, watching TV, going to the movies, talking online with friends, and playing video games (primarily WoW). He was required to hit the 15th % (if memory serves) and he went wayyyy past it. Eventually he will get his GED, and I suspect he won't have a hard time time with that either. Currently he has an interest in Latin, and movies from a movie making angle.

Hang in there.
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