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Eczema and cold weather - Page 2

post #21 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by changingseasons View Post
Seriously. I understand letting your child make decisions about their own body... but if there are underlying food allergies, they could be doing serious damage to his gut, without you or him knowing it. Does he enjoy living with his eczema and seasonal allergies? Has he been informed about the possible connection of what certain foods could be doing to his body? If you are choosing to let a 4yo harm his body, at least make sure that he is informed of the consequences. (And I'm not saying that he is in fact harming his body, but I think that's a possibility- and your job as a mom is to protect him, keep him safe even if he doesn't completely understand or agree with your decision. JMHO.)
Yes, we've talked about all this stuff and we continue to talk about it periodically. He's been tested for food allergies and all was clear (and, yes, I understand that sometimes those tests don't pick up every possible allergy or sensitivity). He's been tested for environmental allergens and only reacted to one type of grass. We have prescriptions and herbal remedies/preventatives. We've been to the acupuncturist and the chiropractor. We are very involved and proactive about this. However, I am not going to force any type of treatment on my child. What to do with his body is his decision. He has decided he'd rather tolerate the eczema and other allergies than take the medicines, herbs or treatments. I respect that.
post #22 of 33
I think that is really cool, your decision. Plus most kids grow out of eczema naturally without any elim diets.
post #23 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SMUM View Post
I think that is really cool, your decision. Plus most kids grow out of eczema naturally without any elim diets.
Thanks. I also believe that sometimes we need to just leave things alone and let them work themselves out. Our bodies are amazing in their ability to overcome problems. Sometimes trying to eliminate an offending substance causes more problems, like the possibility that the use of so many antibacterial agents in personal and home cleaning products may have led to more incidence of asthma in children, especially when regular soap and water work at least as well.
post #24 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarineWife View Post
Thanks. I also believe that sometimes we need to just leave things alone and let them work themselves out. Our bodies are amazing in their ability to overcome problems. Sometimes trying to eliminate an offending substance causes more problems, like the possibility that the use of so many antibacterial agents in personal and home cleaning products may have led to more incidence of asthma in children, especially when regular soap and water work at least as well.
I completely agree. I think in our zeal to kill and beat everything we have lost trust in the body's natural ability for healing...we want it fixed, NOW. Which is just not the way nature works. I wish I had a mom like you to talk to around here! I feel people get "overeducated "and lose common sense sometimes...Thanks for your strong and solid voice.
post #25 of 33
I too agree with trying to let the body heal itself... That is why I use the hydrocortizone mixed with cetiphil for breakouts. My pediatrition gave us a prescription but I did a check on it and if used too much it can change your skin. Making it tougher, and less receptive to feeling, so since I really don't want my kids going around like rock people... I use the hydrocortizone, its much safer and I only use it for flareups that bother the you know what out of us. The best thing I found is to limit exposure to the triggers, like cold (but we still build snow men every year), laundry detergents, and lanoline. I also have flareups when stressed out, so I practice yoga and pilaties to help with stress.
post #26 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarineWife View Post
Thanks. I also believe that sometimes we need to just leave things alone and let them work themselves out. Our bodies are amazing in their ability to overcome problems. Sometimes trying to eliminate an offending substance causes more problems, like the possibility that the use of so many antibacterial agents in personal and home cleaning products may have led to more incidence of asthma in children, especially when regular soap and water work at least as well.
i understand what youre saying, but i do want to point out that ezcema can lead to very serious inections, like staph, etc...that could call for hospitalizations. a friend of mine had to put her 6month old in the hospital due to infections from eczema and it was just horrid.

getting things under control now is a good idea.
post #27 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by homeschoolAK View Post
I too agree with trying to let the body heal itself... That is why I use the hydrocortizone mixed with cetiphil for breakouts. My pediatrition gave us a prescription but I did a check on it and if used too much it can change your skin. Making it tougher, and less receptive to feeling, so since I really don't want my kids going around like rock people... I use the hydrocortizone, its much safer and I only use it for flareups that bother the you know what out of us.
Using steroids (hydrocortisone) on a child's developing body is about as far as you can get from letting the body heal itself. Hydrocortisone thins the skin permanently if used often enough. It also renders the body less able to fight off the bacteria that is common with eczema. In addition, and probably most harmful overall, it suppresses the immune system. The immune system is the body's only way to 'heal itself'. When symptoms are suppressed by drugs, all that happens is that the reaction is pushed back into the body and must be dealt with by another route. Just because you can buy cortisone over the counter does not make it safe. It is about the worst thing you can do when dealing with eczema. It is also one of the reasons that kids with suppressed eczema end up with asthma. The body is trying to tell us something. If we do not listen, it will try to tell us in another way.
post #28 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by homeschoolAK View Post
My pediatrition gave us a prescription but I did a check on it and if used too much it can change your skin. Making it tougher, and less receptive to feeling,
Was it Elidel?

Quote:
Originally Posted by inkedmamajama
ezcema can lead to very serious inections
My ds' eczema is so mild it's almost nonexistent. When I showed it to 3 separate docs on 3 separate occasions, all of them said it was extremely mild. At first they questioned whether he really had it. I had to point it out to them.

I appreciate everyone's concern but I really didn't want this to turn into a discussion about whether and how to treat eczema in that way. That was why I originally said I'm aware of the food allergy issues. I just wanted quick, simple and safe solutions for relieving discomfort when it bothers my ds. We lived in Hawaii for his first 2.5 years of life where we never had this issue, presumably because it was always warm.
post #29 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarineWife View Post
Thanks. I also believe that sometimes we need to just leave things alone and let them work themselves out. Our bodies are amazing in their ability to overcome problems. Sometimes trying to eliminate an offending substance causes more problems, like the possibility that the use of so many antibacterial agents in personal and home cleaning products may have led to more incidence of asthma in children, especially when regular soap and water work at least as well.
Eliminating a food (like dairy) is not at all the same thing as antibacterial use eliminating bacteria and causing problems. There is nothing unhealthy or dangerous about avoiding a food or foods that you are allergic to- in fact quite the opposite.

The more you continue to expose a person to an allergen, the more damage it does- and the body will never be able to heal itself if you keep it in a constant state of reaction and inflammation.

I agree with letting the body heal itself- but you have to give it the opportunity to do so, rather than continuing to harm it.

Your OP asked if there was anything you could do to avoid or treat the pain of eczema... Are you asking if there is a way to mask the symptoms, or actually treat the eczema?

Have you ever tried an elimination diet for your DS? If it is a food, and his body gets a break from it for a while, he might realize how much better his body feels and then choose to avoid the food(s) himself.
post #30 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by changingseasons View Post
Your OP asked if there was anything you could do to avoid or treat the pain of eczema... Are you asking if there is a way to mask the symptoms, or actually treat the eczema?

Have you ever tried an elimination diet for your DS? If it is a food, and his body gets a break from it for a while, he might realize how much better his body feels and then choose to avoid the food(s) himself.
I specifically want to know what I can do to treat the discomfort he feels when it gets irritated, for example, when he came in from the cold and he said it hurt. We have tried an elimination diet and he did not like it all. It also did nothing to change the state of his eczema. The eczema showed up this spring along with his seasonal allergies, which are new since we've moved to NC. So, although there's a lot of info out there about the association between eczema and food allergies/sensitivities, I'm not convinced that's the only cause. I'm more inclined to think my ds' eczema is associated with his seasonal allergies.
post #31 of 33
all three of my daughters have varying degrees of eczema and we rarely use soap on them, no fabric softener or perfumed or dyed laundry soap, no perfumes or lotions, i dont let them use colored soap to wash their hands, we got rid of all polyester and other synthetic fabrics, we use humidifiers, and we all take acidopholus and hemp/fish oil.

that seems to help trememdously. when they get bad in the middle of the winter, i have also put a heating pad on the bad spots to warm them up(with a towel between their skin and the pad) it seems to take the edge off.
post #32 of 33
Hemp milk and cod liver oil have helped our eczema tremendously. The only topical treatment to help us has been Emily's Skin Soothers.

http://www.emilyskinsoothers.com/

HTH
post #33 of 33
Of coarse the best way is to not be exposed to the triggers of a flare up, but when a flare up occurs a small amount of hydrocortizone goes a long way, especially when added to lotion to make it go farther and dilute it some. I have been using this remidy for years and have had not ill effects from its use. The prescriptions for eczema are just a stronger (much stronger) steroid. It is true that too much exposure to any steroid (including hydrocortizone) can effect the skin, but so can sunlight.
I have found that just a little hydrocortizone is enough to ease the pain and discomfort of eczema.

As for the immunes system being the best way for the body to heal I agree, but it does sometimes need a little help.
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