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*~*November*~* Nurses & Future Nurses! - Page 3

post #41 of 89
They scheduled me over status during Christmas week. I work 22nd, 23rd...25th, 26th, 28th and 29th.
I'm so P.O'ed. They know I have small children. I'm OK with working Christmas day but let me have some time with my kiddos that week. Sigh. Guess we'll do it a day early.


Sorry, i really need to focus on how i'm truly grateful that i have a stable job right now. Knock wood.
post #42 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorijds View Post
Let's have a holiday roll-call; who worked Thanksgiving, or is working Christmas or New Years?

I had turkey day off, and I work (nights) Christmas eve, Christmas Day, New Years Eve and New Years day. That kind of sucks, but actually I switched Fourth of July for Christmas, as we have a huge party, and I couldn't get off any other way.
Did you get to pick your days or are you assigned?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BugMacGee View Post
They scheduled me over status during Christmas week. I work 22nd, 23rd...25th, 26th, 28th and 29th.
I'm so P.O'ed. They know I have small children. I'm OK with working Christmas day but let me have some time with my kiddos that week. Sigh.
That stinks with a side of ostomy sauce. I'd be pissed.

AAM: I'm on maternity leave so I don't have to work any holidays this year. Usually, though, we have to work 2 of Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's Eve, and New Year's Day. Not too shabby IMO. We also get to rank the days we most want to work and we almost always get our first picks.
post #43 of 89
Low census on my floor. Got called off today! :
post #44 of 89
Hi Wise Women,

Can I barge into this thread with a question?

I've been considering for a few years getting my ADN, and now I noticed a Master's program at the local university that is a Master's of Nursing/Public Health Administrator combined program. That excites me! Does anyone else have a master's of nursing? I have a Bachelor's in Sociology, do you think I'd have to get my BDN before I did this program?
post #45 of 89
I just finished a four day stint with one patient and other various ones who were not so sick. She is so sick, mammas! She is 33 years old with two babies, and one week prior to being hospitalised she was fine with no medical history and only c sections for surgical.

She now has ARDS/Sepsis, liver shock, thrombocytopenia etc out of nowhere. They have run every culture you can think of with everything coming up negative. She's still so so very sick, but we were able to get her out of junctional tach yesterday and today after the thoracentesis where they pulled almost a liter of fluid, her vital signs look much improved. She's still opening her eyes and trying to tell us things with her propofol drip going at 70 mcg/kg/min!

She's so strong and such a fighter. I felt honored to have been her nurse and worked to save her these past days. I hope I come back in four days and she's extubated. That's my wish for the week. Any prayers for her would be appreciated.
post #46 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuamami View Post
Hi Wise Women,

Can I barge into this thread with a question?

I've been considering for a few years getting my ADN, and now I noticed a Master's program at the local university that is a Master's of Nursing/Public Health Administrator combined program. That excites me! Does anyone else have a master's of nursing? I have a Bachelor's in Sociology, do you think I'd have to get my BDN before I did this program?
There are some master's programs that don't require a BSN prior to entry. I would check with them. I don't have a masters, but I'm almost certain that I'll go back to school for one eventually... I'm just scared of getting sucked into academia and ending up in school forever doing a PhD.

geekgolightly~ Sending lots of healing vibes your patient's way.

Our public health office is mostly closed on holidays, but we do have the same staffing as weekends and still do new postpartum home visits. So as one of the people with the least seniority, I'm working Christmas day. We share the workload with the five other offices across the city to cover the whole area, and I find weekends/holidays kind of nice, usually. We also have an awesome contract, which calls Christmas day a "super-stat", so I'll be making 2 1/2 times my regular wage, plus an extra day off with pay. So I'll be able to make a four day weekend either right before or right after Christmas!
post #47 of 89
golightly-praying for your patient!

Mine needs one too. Ex 24 weeker, now 40 days old. Can't wean off HFOV, completely unstable, now has fungal balls in his kidneys. I couldn't leave his bedside yesterday! It was my 5th shift with him and he just never makes any forward progress. He's so sweet (except that he's such a lil stinker with his constant desats to the 60's) and I want him to get better! Anyway, he needs healing vibes.
post #48 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamanurse View Post
Did you get to pick your days or are you assigned?


We are assigned a rotation of two holidays every year. We have six official holidays, and so you work the same holidays every three years. I traded, though, because there are certain holidays I'd rather have off than others.

Usually all but two nurses get called off on Christmas---I've been lucky before, but this year I'm charging so I'll be there.
post #49 of 89
I'm Melissa, wife to Ry and mum to two little girls - ages six and one.

Currently finishing up my last year of university for my BSN and will write the RN registration exam in June.

I find all the different designations of nursing intersting! Big differences between Canada and the States.

We have registered nurses and registered practical nurses. Up until about six years ago, the RN was a three year diploma program, but they've all moved to a four year university degree program.
post #50 of 89
We self schedule and must work 2 out of the 3 holidays. I worked Thanksgiving, am off Christmas, and work New Year's Eve and New Year's Day. Next year I'll have to work Christmas as we keep track and flip-flop each year.

I work nights and my hospital pays holiday pay for the 24 hours of the holiday- so I have to work the eve and holiday to get the full pay, which kind of stinks sometimes. Oh well.

I'm currently a bit frustrated because it seems like my unit is so over-staffed! Crazy to be upset about that, huh? But seriously, I was hired for a full-time position and made $$ decisions based on projected full-time pay. I think we'll likely be at 20 days on call by the end of the year- that's 1.5(ish) days a month. We work 12's, so we're only scheduled to work 12 days a month as it is! It adds up to a lot of money!
post #51 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by BugMacGee View Post
golightly-praying for your patient!

Mine needs one too. Ex 24 weeker, now 40 days old. Can't wean off HFOV, completely unstable, now has fungal balls in his kidneys. I couldn't leave his bedside yesterday! It was my 5th shift with him and he just never makes any forward progress. He's so sweet (except that he's such a lil stinker with his constant desats to the 60's) and I want him to get better! Anyway, he needs healing vibes.
It takes a very special person to be able to work NICU. Thank you for doing what you do every day. I'll be thinking of him. <3
post #52 of 89
FM, we've had issues with overstaffing, too. We've had days and nights of mandatory time off (fortunately, every night I was charging, so I didn't have to take one...).

I didn't think the economy would affect us like this, but it has. Our hospital hasn't laid off anyone yet, and we even got decent raises this year. We do have a hiring freeze, though. Some area hospitals have laid off a lot of staff and have withheld raises this year.

I've got a lot of seniority where I work; I feel badly for the newer staff, to be a new nurse (which is anxiety producing in and of itself) and then on top of that to have to deal with the idea of lay-offs and knowing they would be the first to go...how stressful.
post #53 of 89
So what is the diffrence between a LVN and a RN, and then what is the diffrence between a LVN and a MA?
post #54 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuamami View Post
Hi Wise Women,

Can I barge into this thread with a question?

I've been considering for a few years getting my ADN, and now I noticed a Master's program at the local university that is a Master's of Nursing/Public Health Administrator combined program. That excites me! Does anyone else have a master's of nursing? I have a Bachelor's in Sociology, do you think I'd have to get my BDN before I did this program?
Oh wow, that sounds cool! Is it for non-nurses? I like Public Health so that sounds neat to me.
post #55 of 89
I worked Thanksgiving but am off Christmas! We rotate every year....one year we work thanksgiving/off christmas...the next year the opposite. I'm happy with it. I would always rather be off and with my family on every holiday but then I think to myself...these parents with their sick kids don't want to be where they are either on a holiday. We had one of our patients die the thanksgiving night that I worked. I can't even imagine.

We have had low census as well! I don't mind being asked to stay home cause I'd rather not work at all (lol! At least I have a choice to stay home or not, if we refuse they will just float us to the NICU) but it is weird, especially this being respiratory season and we are usually full with all our kids on vents and stuff! I have been floating down to the NICU a lot lately. My job is not at risk though at all thank god.

I work in the PICU and we have been getting some REALLY sick kids lately though! LOTS of trauma and LOTS of kids coding and dying lately. We have also had a lot of cancer kids that have "gone bad" in hemoc and come down to our PICU and died....just breaks my heart. So our census has been low but the acuity has been higher than normal it seems (and I work in a level one trauma center only PICU in town so we get and see everything).
post #56 of 89
MA: Medical Assistant. You can really only work in a doctor's office with this certification, and you usually make significantly less than a nurse. They are NOT a nurse, and they work under the license of the physician. You do not have to go to school to do this; it can be on the job training. So that person doing your xray or giving your kids that immunization in the ped office? Could be licensed, or could be taught on the go. In my facility's doc offices, MAs start at $10/hr (just a dollar or so higher than a certified nurse's aide).

LPN/LVN: Licensed practical nurse/licensed vocational nurse. This is the lowest tier of licensed nursing. These nurses have typically completed a one year nursing education (after prerequisites, which usually take a year or two to complete and include basic college prereqs, biology, and A&P), and they have passed their state licensing exam for LPN/LVNs. They must work under an RN--there are meds and procedures, dictated by individual State Boards of Nursing, that specify what an LPN can and cannot do. LPNs at my facility start at $13/hr.

RN: Registered nurse. Has completed two years of nursing education after prereqs, either at the community college or university level, as well as having passed a state licensing exam. Are able to do more meds and procedures than an LPN, and typically supervises LPN care. RNs at my facility start at $21/hr.

I work in a hospital. MAs are only hired by the facility to work in the physician offices. LPNs also work in the physician's offices (they are kind of interchangeable with MAs in that particular environment), and we have limited numbers of them in our hospital. In my hospital, LPNs are used as scrub techs in surgery or used out on the floor as a nurse. LPNs work on a team with an RN and they may not give IV medications, unless they have completed an additional 40 hour course. Then they are limited to certain meds--they can give pain meds, most abx, and diuretics into peripheral lines only. LPNs cannot give blood or do anything with a central line site in my state. RNs have greater responsibility for "managing" the pt's care, and for documentation. LPNs are used in our ER, our medical floor, and our skilled rehab floor. They are used in a very limited manner on our OB/peds floor to enter orders, scrub for c-sections, stock the unit, and provide pt care. They are, however, phasing them out on OB--they aren't firing the ones they have, but they aren't hiring any new ones. Most floors (except the skilled rehab floor and ER) are not hiring new LPNs. Our ICU has never hired them. LPNs will continue to be able to work in our hospital in the ER, on the skilled rehab unit, and in the physician offices. The medical/surgical floors will only be hiring LPNs who are in school to get their RN.

Hope this helps.
post #57 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorijds View Post
MA: Medical Assistant. You can really only work in a doctor's office with this certification, and you usually make significantly less than a nurse. They are NOT a nurse, and they work under the license of the physician. You do not have to go to school to do this; it can be on the job training. So that person doing your xray or giving your kids that immunization in the ped office? Could be licensed, or could be taught on the go. In my facility's doc offices, MAs start at $10/hr (just a dollar or so higher than a certified nurse's aide).

LPN/LVN: Licensed practical nurse/licensed vocational nurse. This is the lowest tier of licensed nursing. These nurses have typically completed a one year nursing education (after prerequisites, which usually take a year or two to complete and include basic college prereqs, biology, and A&P), and they have passed their state licensing exam for LPN/LVNs. They must work under an RN--there are meds and procedures, dictated by individual State Boards of Nursing, that specify what an LPN can and cannot do. LPNs at my facility start at $13/hr.

RN: Registered nurse. Has completed two years of nursing education after prereqs, either at the community college or university level, as well as having passed a state licensing exam. Are able to do more meds and procedures than an LPN, and typically supervises LPN care. RNs at my facility start at $21/hr.

I work in a hospital. MAs are only hired by the facility to work in the physician offices. LPNs also work in the physician's offices (they are kind of interchangeable with MAs in that particular environment), and we have limited numbers of them in our hospital. In my hospital, LPNs are used as scrub techs in surgery or used out on the floor as a nurse. LPNs work on a team with an RN and they may not give IV medications, unless they have completed an additional 40 hour course. Then they are limited to certain meds--they can give pain meds, most abx, and diuretics into peripheral lines only. LPNs cannot give blood or do anything with a central line site in my state. RNs have greater responsibility for "managing" the pt's care, and for documentation. LPNs are used in our ER, our medical floor, and our skilled rehab floor. They are used in a very limited manner on our OB/peds floor to enter orders, scrub for c-sections, stock the unit, and provide pt care. They are, however, phasing them out on OB--they aren't firing the ones they have, but they aren't hiring any new ones. Most floors (except the skilled rehab floor and ER) are not hiring new LPNs. Our ICU has never hired them. LPNs will continue to be able to work in our hospital in the ER, on the skilled rehab unit, and in the physician offices. The medical/surgical floors will only be hiring LPNs who are in school to get their RN.

Hope this helps.
Thanks for the info!

It all gets quite confusing lol!
post #58 of 89
Hello, ladies! I'm a long-time nurse but have been a SAHM for a little over 3 years now. Even though I have nightmares about once a week about working a med-surg floor, I feel that my skills have suffered and really want to do *something* to keep up my experience. Only problem, I have a clingy nursling toddler who hates to be away from me and lots of family obligations. I'd love to temp or PRN, but without current experience, would be very wary of anyone who would hire me.

I probably need a refresher course and would need to endorse my license into my current state, but without wanting to go back to work full-time, can't see spending the money and taking the time away from my family. I've kept my license from my original state (which thankfully doesn't require CEUs), so at least I still have that. I've also considered going back to school, but no idea what I want to be when I grow up. What to do, what to do.

Anyone else gone back to nursing after a prolonged SAHM career?
post #59 of 89
No Kate but I too have (and have had) a very clingy nursling toddler and worked through it. I had to switch to a unit with 8 hour shifts, sacrificing the acuity and learning experiences of my former unit.

My clingy one is now 2.5 and has gotten used to mommy "going work, taking care of babies". I've always been the primary breadwinner. Now I'm a single mom so unfortunately, I've never been able to SAH with my kids apart from my 6 month mat. leaves.

A lot of my co-workers SAH'ed while their kids were little and went back once they got older.

Good luck with whatever you decide!
post #60 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turkish Kate View Post
Hello, ladies! I'm a long-time nurse but have been a SAHM for a little over 3 years now. Even though I have nightmares about once a week about working a med-surg floor, I feel that my skills have suffered and really want to do *something* to keep up my experience. Only problem, I have a clingy nursling toddler who hates to be away from me and lots of family obligations. I'd love to temp or PRN, but without current experience, would be very wary of anyone who would hire me.

I probably need a refresher course and would need to endorse my license into my current state, but without wanting to go back to work full-time, can't see spending the money and taking the time away from my family. I've kept my license from my original state (which thankfully doesn't require CEUs), so at least I still have that. I've also considered going back to school, but no idea what I want to be when I grow up. What to do, what to do.

Anyone else gone back to nursing after a prolonged SAHM career?
I haven't but....

I think you would be ok with taking a refresher class--just to kinda go over your basic skills, or even buy a nursing skills book to look through. You would catch back on in no time. And PRN or part time would be the way to go--I would love to do that in a year or two. You might just need to ask a lot of questions at first but you would get the hang of it. I know a few nurses who have quit and then come back after a few years for different reasons. I do NOT think it's going to keep you from being employed.

I think the most important thing is to find a unit that is really supportive and has great teamwork and find something that would you ENJOY! I work in PICU and we sometimes float down to NICU and I really enjoy my job. I think I would like OB nursing as well. If your having nightmares about med/surg then why do it?

I also work nights because that is easier for my kids and family....I'm more tired but it really works for us right now.

Good luck!
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