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Help picking an Indian (Desi) baby name - Page 2

post #21 of 27
My dd has an Indian first name and an American middle name. My in-laws didn't really like either, but dh and I LOVE her name. I have a name picked out for another girl, but I don't know what we'll do if we have a boy. None of the Indian boy names really resonate with us

* edited out dd's name because it came up in a google search.
post #22 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by USAmma View Post
What part of India is your dh from? There may be names that are unique to his language (of the many that are spoken in India). Maybe he would like to use one from his own language, or maybe he doesn't care. Also, if his family belongs to a particular religious heritage you want to probably try to keep the name agreeable to that. For example if they worship Vishnu as their main family God you don't want to give the baby a Saivite (those who worship Siva) name. If your dh's family is not that religious or they are more ecclectic within Hinduism then it doesn't matter as much.
Thanks for your thoughtful response USAmma.

My DH is from Delhi, his family are Punjabi hindus who speak hindi. But as far as naming goes, I think his family is probably more what you noted as "ecclectic." For instance, although DH is Punjabi, his own "good name" is, I believe, Bengali.

I think his parents will probably just be pleased with an Indian name, whatever its province. Their only other grandchild (my DH's niece) has a totally western name, first and last.

I understand what you are saying about westernizing a name too much. My husband grew up in the U.S. with a "weird," i.e. foreign, name - but he never changed it or went by a western name. And it bothers him that his father, named Jagdish, introduces himself as "Jay." But I can also see how it is easier for his father than trying to say his name 5000 times for someone else to understand.

I read this article in an Indian newspaper recently, describing that the unfortunate trend of shortening of beautiful Indian names is no longer confined to the U.S. but is prevalent in India also. http://www.hinduonnet.com/thehindu/m...2100960200.htm

As for Obama, I can't imagine that anyone is not moved and amazed by the fact that a person with his name was able to become president of the U.S. However, he did go by the name "Barry" until he became an adult. Just goes to show that sometimes it takes awhile for a person to appreciate his or her own uniqueness.

The names of your daughters are beautiful and have lovely meanings. And thanks for your response, it gave me a lot to think about.
post #23 of 27
Having just found the multicultural forum, I thought I would add my own two rupees, although stylishly late per Indian culture! LOL

When my son's referral arrived (he was adopted from Kerala) I had thought I was going to name him a Scottish name, because my parents are Scottish.
However, having taken one look at him, he did not look like Ian! My late grandfathers name was Ian, and I wanted to incorporate his name in my son.

I was given the sanskit baby name book and spent hours pouring through there, reading the names, looking at the meanings, deciding if I liked the meaninging, if the birth name would go with the new name ect.

Ex husband and I couldn't decide on names, because he had very different ideas for names than I did (much like usamm was mentioning -regional names).
My sons name was Sarath at his referral time. So finally decided on Ravi.

My dd1 came with a name which I didn't at the time think anyone could handle or say, so we chose to give her a totally new name. We named her Lakshmi Selena Rose, although I thought of naming her Priya, or Saraswati or Lekha. I liked all of those. The problem was that my mil was named Venkatalakshma. So we shortened my dd's name, to make it acceptable to the family.

My dd2 came with the name Supriya, so I named her Priya Sarojini Elizabeth.

My girls can call themselves by their middle name if they want to, and my son is stuck with his name. No one has ever given him a hard time, so he is happy with it, and he has his birth name if he wants to be called something else.

I like all the names you shared, and agree with Darshani..let them be proud of their culture and names.
post #24 of 27
I was wondering if it would be considered offensive for a Caucasion mother such as myself, to name a baby Nitara . I saw that earlier in the thread and it just spoke to me... deeply rooted, very beautiful!
post #25 of 27
Soposdedi, I hope not, because I'm not more than a quarter of anything, so whatever I name my kid is going to be basically "stealing" from another culture. Foo, the important thing is that you respect the name and the heritage and come at it with thankfulness for the beautiful culture that produced it. Just my opinion.
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by soposdedi View Post
I was wondering if it would be considered offensive for a Caucasion mother such as myself, to name a baby Nitara . I saw that earlier in the thread and it just spoke to me... deeply rooted, very beautiful!
As someone of Indian heritage, I can say that I am always totally flattered when someone takes a bit of my heritage and uses it. Everything from OM tattoos to naming their kids Indian names.

I think boy names are a lot harder than girl names. I have 3 girl names I love, and no ideas at all about boy names.
post #27 of 27
I like all of your names. Girl-name wise, I love Priyanka (but then again I have a good friend who goes by this name) and Amrita best. Boy-wise, Vivek and Vikram are favorites.

Let's see boy names that come to mind that are also easy to pronounce... Brij, Rahul, Pradeep, and Rohin all come to mind. Girls names are almost unlimited... umm... Padma, Indira, Anita, Ambika, Naseen, etc.
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