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Sleep Articles

Sleep is a topic on Mothering.

All good babies.

                Two weeks after my son was born the crying began.   He woke every twenty minutes during naps and nighttime and we’d nurse back to sleep again and again until sunrise.   Often he would not latch on so instead of nursing him to sleep I would stand in the darkness with him cradled in my arms, doing deep knee bends to quiet his tears.   I ached for sleep. I ached for silence. I ached for ease and grace.   And each night would finally end with the sun, and I would wake one last time to his sharp cries and we would rise and begin... read more

How to Improve Your Arm's Reach Crib: My Quest for the Perfect Co-Sleeper

By Megan Leary   I started a hunt for the perfect co-sleeper in the latter days of my second pregnancy. As a semi-co-sleeping family I wanted something that would house my little guy safely in his own area but be attached directly to our bed. I wanted to reach out and touch him, pull him near to nurse, then push him back so I could get comfy rest.   Hey guess what doesn't exist in America? My perfect co-sleeper. They have some in Itay. Here is one in the UK. Look at this awesome one in Germany. But if you want something stateside your choices are very... read more

3 Rules for Bedtime Reading

New research reveals that fewer and fewer parents share bedtime reading with their children. More than one-third of parents in one study don't do any bedtime reading with their kids. Whether it's due to time-crunch, life stress or (as reported by almost half the study's parents) that their children prefer television, toys or computer games, dropping bedtime reading creates a loss with potential lifelong repercussions. My rules simplify things to help nurture and protect your bedtime reading routine.   I'll keep this brief, because frankly, I think one of the culprits... read more

Who the Heck First Thought Up the Cry it Out Approach?

  What is Cry It Out? I’ll tell you, but first I have to climb into the nook under my staircase so no one knows what we’re discussing.   Cry It Out is an approach to getting babies to sleep. It was first proposed by Dr. Emmett Holt in 1895 in The Care and Feeding of Children. Holt is considered to be the father of pediatric medicine, though I suspect midwives might propose that medical care for children has been around a bit longer. In fact, with his designation as the pioneer of pediatric medicine, I suspect thousands of years of doctors, shamans, medicine men,... read more

Gentle Sleep

             We all hear the horror stories of sleep deprived new mothers.  I think we’ve been so conditioned to think of late nights with babies that it’s one of the first things we comment upon when meeting up with a new mom.  So when I was pregnant with my first, I was prepared.  I was sure we would go to the hospital, give birth, and that would be the end of our sleep for years.   So you can imagine my surprise when we brought our oldest daughter home from the hospital, and she slept through the night.  From day one.   We had always read and heard that babies... read more

Who the Heck First Thought Up the Cry it Out Approach? PART II: Dr. Richard Ferber

By Brian Leaf   (Note: This article is the second of a two part series. For the first part, see Who the Heck First Thought Up the Cry it Out Approach?)   Dr. Richard Ferber is the father of The Ferber Approach, often called Ferberizing. This is billed as the kinder, gentler approach to Holt’s Cry It Out approach.             Ferber’s method, described in his 1986 book Solve Your Child's Sleep Problems, recommends rather than simply abandoning your baby to cry until she stops, as Holt had recommended, that a baby be allowed to cry for a designated amount of time... read more

Why Do I Feel Guilty About My Naps?

By Tamara Reese for Brain, Child: The Magazine for Thinking Mothers   I went back to work when my firstborn was six weeks old and I felt like my heart was being ripped out of my body every minute of the day until I could race home to him.   Deciding to stay home was scary and I feel blessed our family was able to make financial sacrifices enabling me to make this choice. But once the band-aid was pulled, I found myself in a day-to-day rhythm that was completely foreign to me. In addition, I felt like I was a one-woman-show with a social stigma to refute. If I was... read more

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