Can I plant a veggie garden where dog poop has been? - Mothering Forums
Gardening > Can I plant a veggie garden where dog poop has been?
MayBaby2007's Avatar MayBaby2007 12:21 AM 03-23-2009
I borrowed an electric tiller to till along a fence to plant sunflowers...to cheer the place up.

I had so much fun, that on a whim, I created a curved 25'(ish) by 13'(ish) bed, thinking I could put a nice flower bed it. It's shaped like a " D ". It faces the street. It has a Yuka bush (?) in the top center of it (built the bed around it).

So now I have this huge area to make pretty. Only....I didn't think this thing through and don't want to spend all sorts of $ on flowers. I could, I guess...but I don't want to.

This side of the house was/is where my dog poops. I read dog poop can be harmful and you should only plant ornamental plants where it's been. It's full sun/great for veggies. Its the side of my yard that faces a busy street (it was supposed to be a nice decorative flower bed)....

Can I put veggies/fruits here instead? Or should I stick to my original plan? I'm asking in the aspect of safety (dog poop) and visual appeal....and whether or not a "curved" veggie garden is even doable.? TIA.

MaryEllenJ's Avatar MaryEllenJ 02:37 AM 03-23-2009
I have never heard about dog poop in particular being dangerous. I would think that the dog's diet would be an issue, if anything. If a dog is fed the BARF natural diet, I wouldn't think that their excretions would be harmful.

And keeping dogs out of the garden could be a huge issue. If you're concerned, perhaps you could do some container gardening in that area.
philomom's Avatar philomom 02:42 AM 03-23-2009
I just this week completed a master gardener class out here in Oregon. They do advise the public to be careful with cat, dog and swine poop because those animals do carry parasites that may be transferred to humans.

So, no I don't think I could recommend that eat anything that might come out of this garden bed this year. If you can keep the dog from pooping in this area , it may be quite safe to eat veggies planted there next year.
Mama Dragon's Avatar Mama Dragon 03:12 AM 03-23-2009
I've planted where the dog pooped, but we cleaned up all the poop before tilling. If you tilled the poop in, you might want to wait a season.

OT - philomom, how did you like the course? Did you do the volunteer work too or just the course? I'm going to try to start in January =)
philomom's Avatar philomom 03:54 AM 03-23-2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Dragon View Post
OT - philomom, how did you like the course? Did you do the volunteer work too or just the course? I'm going to try to start in January =)
The course was 12 weeks here. I learned a good bit and made some new friends. Now there is 60 hours of volunteer work to get done. I've gotten 10 hours in so far. However, I've got until October to get all those hours in.
laohaire's Avatar laohaire 12:01 PM 03-23-2009
Jumping in on this thread. I have a similar problem - set up a SFG raised bed last year, but due to a variety of factors (fatigue, mostly), I didn't plant last year. So the cat came along and used it as a catbox.

I will be planting a summer crop in May. Do you think it's enough to just dig out the cat poop? My cats are fed a conventional dry food diet and sometimes hunt mice. Also, my SFG bed gets pretty wet due to lots of rain and not-too-terrific drainage; I don't see how I'm just going to dig around with a pooper scooper. Would I be crazy to just use my hands and wash them well after? Maybe I should buy some gloves for the task. Uck. It would SUCK to lose another year of planting but I don't want to give my family parasites!
philomom's Avatar philomom 03:02 PM 03-24-2009
Laohaire,
You could put on gloves and remove all the poop you see, but that may not be enough. Also, cats can be methodical about where their wastes go. I worry that your cat would continue pooping in this garden unless you use some row covers or some barrier to keep the cat out.

Why don't you call your local extension agent... they may have master gardeners, too and ask them what they might recommend for your area?

Good luck.
Red Pajama's Avatar Red Pajama 04:58 PM 03-24-2009
We just had someone from our local extension office come to our parents' group and talked about gardening. He talked about manure, and said the safe practice is 120 days from application to harvest. So next year, but not this year.
laohaire's Avatar laohaire 05:28 PM 03-24-2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Pajama View Post
We just had someone from our local extension office come to our parents' group and talked about gardening. He talked about manure, and said the safe practice is 120 days from application to harvest. So next year, but not this year.
Hmm... if I read this right, we could do it this year then. The garden is still filled with snow; nobody has pooped in there since late October : . To be simplistic, assuming 30 days a month times 5 months, that's 150 days. And we're not harvesting yet; we won't even plant for another month or two - so that's another 60 days to planting.
philomom's Avatar philomom 03:41 AM 03-25-2009
Oh, good. I was looking it up on this side and hadn't found a firm answer yet.
be11ydancer's Avatar be11ydancer 02:24 PM 03-26-2009
I don't think it would be too big of a problem then since it's been a while. It's not like your piling fresh dog poop around potato plants or anything. You might through some finished compost on top of it all. It'll be fine.
Girl In The Fire's Avatar Girl In The Fire 08:15 PM 03-26-2009
Last year I planted some veggies in an area that *my* dog pooped in that previous winter. I picked the poop out prior to tilling and planted and eventually ate the tomatoes and herbs that grew there. It was just my dog who I know does not have worms and not random strange animals. I would think as long as you knew that your animal did not have parasites and did not continue to let them poop all over your plants it would be fine. I don't have worms ...hopefully...
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