Growing herbs in pots - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 3 Old 05-01-2002, 02:45 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I've had lots of success with mints, and traditional culinary herbs (basil, rosemary, oregano, etc) so far. After making May wine with the last of my meadowsweet and sweet woodruff, I am now wondering if these can be grown well in pots?

April
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#2 of 3 Old 05-12-2002, 06:00 AM
 
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Just found this as it almost slipped off the page. I guess you could grow these in pots altho' they may take a bit more effort since the traditional in pots culinary herbs are mediterranean & need lots of sun & not too much water.

Woodruff is a woodland plant I think so would need to be kept dry. It may need to be shaded a bit as well. I don't think we get it here, but it used to grow wild near where I lived in England.

Meadowsweet I love. I grew some from seed once & it was my pride & joy. I have it in my garden. It needs to be kept moist since it is a riverside plant naturally & mine also dies down in winter.

The may wine sounds divine. Maybe you should post the recipe & I'll save it for next spring
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#3 of 3 Old 05-12-2002, 12:09 PM
 
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Woodruff can be grown in a pot, in SHADE. Does better in the ground but what does not?

Ohh and I have a recipe for Strawberries in a Sweet Woodruff Syrup. That dish is gonna be my dessert for the cooking class I am about to teach. I will post the recipe if you would like.

IF you are gonna do the mediteranean herbs in pots, please use clay pots (terracotta). They are more of a pain to move, but they dry nicely and give more air and drainage to the plants.
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