Questions from wannabe urban container gardner - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-09-2011, 09:10 AM - Thread Starter
 
t2009's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Somewhere between here & there
Posts: 612
Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)

I really want to start growing some vegetables this year. We're in an urban area (with a yard, but not great sunlight). I have a ton of questions!

 

Here's the thing... I know nothing about gardening... We are moving at the end of the summer (mid-August) so I am not sure it will be "worth it" to start growing veggies this year. What do you think? If I use all containers, can I move the plants with us to our new apartment (it'll be a 2 day drive)?

 

If I decide to tackle this, what's the best bet for planting veggies that we'll actually be able to enjoy before the move? I'm thinking herbs & greens...? Do these start from seeds?

 

Any books or websites to suggest?

 

Thanks! I'm am seriously daydreaming about doing this all the time, so I really want to start this year, but I'll wait if I have to.

 


Mama to my little busy bee. 

t2009 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-09-2011, 04:35 PM
 
RoamingWidgeteer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Gulf Islands, BC, Canada
Posts: 92
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I dont know your climate at all, but you could try a couple of big containers with lettuce, arugula, kale. In my experience, small containers dry out too quickly making the lettuce bolt (bitter) so bigger pots are better. Plant varieties that you can pick individual leaves from for a long harvest period and much faster reward :)

 

Depending on your esthetics, a wooden frame with plastic lining could become a disposable tub that you discard for the move (after eating the greens of course!).Here's one rather clever idea: http://www.instructables.com/id/Milk-Crate-Air-Pot-Square-Foot-Urban-Container-G/ 

 

Oh, and moving with plants is awkward and difficult at best. They require a disproportionate amount of space because you can't stack, are heavy, and are difficult to secure. Unless there's some plant you really want to keep or is hard to find (like Basil "Perpetuo"), I really don't recommend it. Mind you, last move I had to bring four fruit trees, 8 blueberry bushes and an assortment of herbs ;-)


Happily married, with DS 08.2010
RoamingWidgeteer is offline  
Old 02-10-2011, 11:44 AM
 
sjd_ca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Definitely check out Gayla Trail's books and/or website. She focuses on small-space and container urban gardening and is very inspiring!

 

sjd_ca is offline  
Old 02-10-2011, 12:03 PM
 
Pariah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: My happy place.
Posts: 2,727
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Bountiful Container and The Apartment Gardener are my two favorite books for info on gardening in urban/small spaces. The Apartment Gardener is an old book, from the 70s, but the info is still great.

 


stillheart.gif = Pariah, Super Mom + The Amazing Wiggy (1/06)superhero.gifangel.gif  (6/08)  52 Projects: 0/52  Decluttering Challenge: 37/2013

Pariah is offline  
Old 02-10-2011, 03:51 PM
 
RoamingWidgeteer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Gulf Islands, BC, Canada
Posts: 92
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


 

Quote:

 

If I decide to tackle this, what's the best bet for planting veggies that we'll actually be able to enjoy before the move? I'm thinking herbs & greens...? Do these start from seeds?

 


Growing greens from seeds is an excellent way to go. I've had good luck with mesclun mixes like this one: http://www.westcoastseeds.com/productdetail/Vegetable-Seeds/Mescluns-and-Salad-Greens/Tangy-Mesclun/  (but get something similar from a local garden centre). Either start plants indoors and translant outside when it starts getting warmer, or sow directly into the soil. Then, when the plants have three or more leaves, you can start picking a leaf from each plant, or do Cut-and-Come Again plantings.


Happily married, with DS 08.2010
RoamingWidgeteer is offline  
Old 02-14-2011, 10:29 AM - Thread Starter
 
t2009's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Somewhere between here & there
Posts: 612
Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)

Thank you for all the suggestions! I'm so excited to get started! We actually have a handful of big ceramic pots left by a former tenant, so we are 1/2 way there!


Mama to my little busy bee. 

t2009 is online now  
Old 02-16-2011, 03:21 AM
 
RoamingWidgeteer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Gulf Islands, BC, Canada
Posts: 92
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Good luck and let us know how it goes :)

(If the ceramic pots are unglazed, they will dry the soil out quickly - keep an eye on them & water often, or place them in a saucer to draw water up into the pot if the soil dries out too fast)


Happily married, with DS 08.2010
RoamingWidgeteer is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off