Anyone ever tried really simplistic gardening? - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 4 Old 05-26-2013, 09:03 AM - Thread Starter
 
EchoSoul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Michigan
Posts: 404
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I'm talkin'... forget the fertilizer, and the mulch, and the raised beds..... Use what nature has already provided right there.

 

A couple weeks ago I wanted to plant some pea seeds. I read they prefer to be planted after the ground has thawed, but still cool. I looked around the gardened area, and spotted some nature-made mulch of dried leaves that were stuck together and piled heavily on the dirt from the fall and winter, and sure enough, when I pushed them aside, the soil was still very cool. So I put some pea seeds under there, and several other spots like that. Anyway, I have pea sproutings!

 

Excited to see how this turns out.

EchoSoul is offline  
#2 of 4 Old 05-26-2013, 10:14 AM
 
EarthRootsStarSoul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 815
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)

That's how it starts... 

 

winky.gif

 

before you know it, you're shopping for heirloom tomatoes, mulch, and organic fertilizer


bellyhair.giftreehugger.gif     coolshine.gif      greenthumb.gif     read.gif
EarthRootsStarSoul is online now  
#3 of 4 Old 05-26-2013, 10:32 AM
 
tinuviel_k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 3,370
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you are growing in a pretty fertile area and are growing mainly plants that are native or acclimated to your area you might have good sucess with "hands off" gardening.

In my case it never would have worked. "Nature" did not provide me with a garden area: my yard has had 50+ years of cruddy, sandy soil used only to grow a lawn, maybe fertilized with chemical fertilizer by some owners of the property over the years, in a region with tons of rainfall that had washed whatever nutrients that might have been present originally. I tried to grow a garden on this soil and had abysmal results. When I did a soil composition test and nutrient test the next year I found that the soil had almost zero organic matter and nutrients.

I order for me to have a successful garden I needed to build raised beds and truck in garden soil. Alternatively I could have worked on the soil I had for several years, adding manure, compost, minerals, and fertilizers to build up the soil. It would have taken awhile.

Also, if I want to grow veggies that aren't in love with my climate I need to take special measures. I can grow peas, lettuce, kale, potatoes, greens, and the like with ease. But I live in a rainy, short season area, so if I want to grow tomatos, squash, eggplant, melons, or other long season, heat loving veggies I have to take special measures. I use cloches, covered hoop houses (over my raised beds), vegetable starts instead of certain seeds, and special plant varieties.

Regardless, after years of gardening one will always need to add something back to the soil. Compost, mulch, manure, fertilizers, minerals... What you need depends on your area and your soil's composition. If you are constantly taking something out of the soil (veggies!) then something needs to go back in or the soil will become depleted.
tinuviel_k is offline  
#4 of 4 Old 05-26-2013, 01:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
EchoSoul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Michigan
Posts: 404
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinuviel_k View Post

If you are growing in a pretty fertile area and are growing mainly plants that are native or acclimated to your area you might have good sucess with "hands off" gardening.

In my case it never would have worked. "Nature" did not provide me with a garden area: my yard has had 50+ years of cruddy, sandy soil used only to grow a lawn, maybe fertilized with chemical fertilizer by some owners of the property over the years, in a region with tons of rainfall that had washed whatever nutrients that might have been present originally. I tried to grow a garden on this soil and had abysmal results. When I did a soil composition test and nutrient test the next year I found that the soil had almost zero organic matter and nutrients.

I order for me to have a successful garden I needed to build raised beds and truck in garden soil. Alternatively I could have worked on the soil I had for several years, adding manure, compost, minerals, and fertilizers to build up the soil. It would have taken awhile.

Also, if I want to grow veggies that aren't in love with my climate I need to take special measures. I can grow peas, lettuce, kale, potatoes, greens, and the like with ease. But I live in a rainy, short season area, so if I want to grow tomatos, squash, eggplant, melons, or other long season, heat loving veggies I have to take special measures. I use cloches, covered hoop houses (over my raised beds), vegetable starts instead of certain seeds, and special plant varieties.

Regardless, after years of gardening one will always need to add something back to the soil. Compost, mulch, manure, fertilizers, minerals... What you need depends on your area and your soil's composition. If you are constantly taking something out of the soil (veggies!) then something needs to go back in or the soil will become depleted.


Didn't know that, thanks for the tip! I'm a newbie gardener. I tried growing squash a couple summers ago and the results were pitiful.

EchoSoul is offline  
Reply

Tags
Gardening

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off