Let's talk Turkey ... no, no, no ... not Turkey, TOMATOES - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 16 Old 07-20-2005, 11:25 PM - Thread Starter
 
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So, I have some, what appears to be, THRIVING tomatoe plants. They are green as can be, I water about as often as I should, organic 100%... BUT.. so many of the plants have nice, big green tomatoes hanging on them, that are STILL green after two weeks, what's up with that? Why aren't they turning red so I can eat them? :LOL (I bet they know what's coming) ..

But, seriously, am I not doing something I should. My cherry tomatoes are turning red, one at a time : , which doesn't make for a very big salad, but, hey, at least they are getting red. Advice?
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#2 of 16 Old 07-21-2005, 01:30 AM
 
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At least you HAVE tomatoes... ours are still in the flower stage... this is my first garden, so I'm not much help, sorry.
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#3 of 16 Old 07-21-2005, 11:56 AM
 
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Patience....patience... :LOL
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#4 of 16 Old 07-21-2005, 01:15 PM
 
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Patience is the key It's hard, I know. We generally don't get ripe tomotoes until the first, sometimes second week of August here. A few might come in before and some varieties are very early but don't taste quite as good. My sister is growing bloody butcher, a small heirloom salad tomato and she's been getting ripe onces since July 10th, but she said they are good but not as tasty as our regular crops.

If you're growing heirlooms, my experience is that most of them take a bit of extra time than the hybrids, but the wait is well worth it! (where's our dancing tomato? )

Just wait about a day to two for those cherries, I bet they start overwhelming you with ripe ones very soon, LOL!! :LOL

While you are waiting, why not fry up a batch of green ones? Or, make some fridge pickles of some green ones?
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#5 of 16 Old 07-21-2005, 01:32 PM
 
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Oh, great, at this rate, we won't have tomatoes til the first frost! I'm growing Brandywines... *sigh!*
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#6 of 16 Old 07-21-2005, 04:20 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Are you guys for real? You mean these guys actually need MORE time? I heard that around here we should have tomatoes by the fourth of July... but maybe that is miracle-grown ones? (Anybody on the same line with St. Louis)

Cherries are really starting to come into their own... but those big ones don't even have a hint of red....

(Stomping my feet.... I don't wan't to wait, I want them NOW)

Sigh.... this is sort of like being pregnant...
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#7 of 16 Old 07-22-2005, 02:09 AM
 
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My cherry tomatoes are also coming in red one at a time and my roma are too. I have another variety (bigger) that are turning red one at a time until today...there are a bunch of them out there. I also tried a small yellow pear variety...I've only had one turn yellow...it actually bloomed and turn into a tomato. I think there are problems with the plants though b/c they don't look well.

homemade tomatoes are sooooo good though~~ WELL worth the wait!!
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#8 of 16 Old 07-22-2005, 02:16 AM
 
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I am growing Early Girls, Cherries and some green variety... and *none* of them are bigger than a marble yet, much less turning red (I'm in zone 8)! I'm so jealous!

I plucked a small green one yesterday and ate it and thought i poisoned myself, it tasted so bad!

Kristina in Kitsap County, WA
Doula, Student Midwife, Mama, Wife & More
http://redspiral.blogspot.com
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#9 of 16 Old 07-25-2005, 11:03 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Midwesternmomma
Are you guys for real? You mean these guys actually need MORE time? I heard that around here we should have tomatoes by the fourth of July... but maybe that is miracle-grown ones? (Anybody on the same line with St. Louis)

Cherries are really starting to come into their own... but those big ones don't even have a hint of red....

(Stomping my feet.... I don't wan't to wait, I want them NOW)

Sigh.... this is sort of like being pregnant...
Yes, we're for real... :LOL :LOL The pregnant comment got me laughing because I called my pg belly and my Mid-August born dd my 'summer tomato' because she matured exactly when my tomatoes did that summer, and at 2 weeks past due I was out in the garden with my giant belly hanging down, pulling weeds trying to do enough activity to stimulate labor--(which never happened, but that's a different story for another thread)

I just looked at a seed packet for an heirloom tomato and it says 80 days, so if you planted on May 15, you're looking at early August at the soonest. You really need to plant 'Early Girl' or one of the other more commercial varieties with a shorter season if you're going to be this impatient about it... hee hee...
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#10 of 16 Old 07-25-2005, 11:56 AM
 
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Speaking of Tomatoes, the deer have found mine! Has to be deer because it's the delicious, tender top growth that's being munched and that's 4 to five feet off the ground. We have tons of deer around here but I've never had too much of a problem with them, just a few nibbles here and there, now I'm steaming mad! Any suggestions? They also ate some of my dwarf sunflowers, but that could've been the squirrels.

This means they've come right up into the yard rather than out in the field. They recently lost acres and acres of habitat just down the street, they are putting up a new subdivision and ripped out some woods that have been there forever It's only 1/8th mile down the street, so I think this may have something to do with their new found bravery, or should I say desperation.

I just don't want my plants totally destroyed. Do you think they'll eat the older growth? Or, the tomatoes?
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#11 of 16 Old 07-25-2005, 12:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shaywyn
Speaking of Tomatoes, the deer have found mine! Has to be deer because it's the delicious, tender top growth that's being munched and that's 4 to five feet off the ground. We have tons of deer around here but I've never had too much of a problem with them, just a few nibbles here and there, now I'm steaming mad! Any suggestions? They also ate some of my dwarf sunflowers, but that could've been the squirrels.

This means they've come right up into the yard rather than out in the field. They recently lost acres and acres of habitat just down the street, they are putting up a new subdivision and ripped out some woods that have been there forever It's only 1/8th mile down the street, so I think this may have something to do with their new found bravery, or should I say desperation.

I just don't want my plants totally destroyed. Do you think they'll eat the older growth? Or, the tomatoes?
In my experience, when deer are desperate or forced from their historical trails, they'll eat anything and everything in their new paths. My family lives on the East end of Long Island, and as the area has less open space, the deer have become BRUTAL We fence everything we love (either with a complete enclosure, including a top, or the top fence rail needs to be 8'6"--they can jump anything lower). If they can't eat it, they'll rub their horns on it and destroy tree bark, etc. The more development, the worse it gets, so expect the same near you, unfortunately.

Try home made hot pepper and or garlic spray, or rotten egg spray (there should be recipes at gardenweb or google for ideas) on the plants, hang stinky soaps and human hair in old stockings near them. I think that the best defense is a rotating one that changes every week or so because after a while they seem to be able to tolerate anything. Be careful with the pepper spray that you don't forget and get it on your hands/into eyes, etc.

Deer are beautiful, but I have had so many bad experiences with them that I consider them to be giant, pesky, disease spreading rodents that have no natural predators....blech.
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#12 of 16 Old 07-25-2005, 02:22 PM
 
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We have very tiny tiny green fruits now!

I have also likened having a garden to being pregnant. I found out I was pg just about the time we planted our garden, and both take patience and trust. Dh and I worried that maybe we were just watering dirt, til we saw those first shoots come up (practically overnight!). It's like worrying during pregancy... until I heard that little heartbeat, I just had to trust that all was going as planned... and it was!
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#13 of 16 Old 07-25-2005, 03:34 PM
 
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Thanks Gardenmom Although you confirmed most of what I feared. Thanks for the ideas, I am going to put a little hot pepper on there tonight
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#14 of 16 Old 08-03-2005, 02:31 PM
 
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I have another tomato question.....

We have tons of big green cherries and big green romas and big green big ones (I don't remember the kind! : ) Anyhow...the cherries and romas and beginning to turn red one at a time. However, the big ones are rotting on the vine! The few that have turned mush in my hand when I pick them. Others are bruised and rotting. Some aren't red yet and doing that! Any ideas, suggestions, etc?

Jenn, momma to 4 busy bees
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#15 of 16 Old 08-03-2005, 02:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiltie Girl
I have another tomato question.....

We have tons of big green cherries and big green romas and big green big ones (I don't remember the kind! : ) Anyhow...the cherries and romas and beginning to turn red one at a time. However, the big ones are rotting on the vine! The few that have turned mush in my hand when I pick them. Others are bruised and rotting. Some aren't red yet and doing that! Any ideas, suggestions, etc?
It could be 'blossom end rot' if it's starting at the bottom end and turning black where the flower used to be, then it progresses and ends up being a big black spot that consumes half or more of the fruit. I think this occurs primarily due to a calcium deficiency in the soil, which can be helped by adding bone meal or kelp, (I think). It may be hard to adjust this late in the game, however. I would remove the fruits with any rot on them to encourage the plant to put energy into new fruits if they still can, and also add calcium.

There is also a (mostly) natural product with calcium that can be sprayed on the plants to absorb through the foliage as a quick fix, but I forget the name of it. I think planet natural or gardens alive carries it...

It may be something else entirely, but that's my 2 cents.
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#16 of 16 Old 08-03-2005, 11:05 PM
 
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We had terrible problems last year with blossom end rot. I think out of the dozen plants we had, we got maybe 4 edible tomatoes. It was very sad, and a bit disheartening to have our first garden in this home do so badly. However, this year (Knock on wood!), things appear to be going much better. We used wood ash (from the big fire ring we use to burn wood and leaves) on both the beds, and have been throwing the lawn clippings around the tomatoes, and so far there has been no rot. I am not sure if this cured the problem, or if it is the warmer summer we are having this year, or what... but I will take what I can get!

We have had one or two ripe yellow heirloom tomatoes a day for a week or so. The huge beefsteaks have produced so heavily we had to re-enforce the cages. I sure hope they all turn out ok, I am so ready for this harvest! I wish we all liked fried green tomatoes or green tomato relish at this time of the year.

I agree, it does seem to take forever. My tomatoes are never ready when the label on the seed package say. I am not sure why, maybe I am not giving them enough light when they are starts inside? We have a big harvest usually in mid-august. Today I noticed some of them look a bit pink, and am so excited

Stupid deer. I have a freind who lives in an area where the deer are fearless. She had some climb her steps and eat her container garden off her porch! She had to do the same thing as gardenmom, and build an enclosure with a "roof". I read somewhere that if you take those CDs that are forever coming in the mail (like those free AOL trial things) and hang around the garden so they can spin it will scare the deer. I don't know anyone who has tried this myself, but I have seen CDs glinting in the sun of some gardens. I am thankful the deer here, so far, are still afraid of us! Oh, to keep little critters out of the garden, I have been putting the hair from when I groom the dogs around the beds. Seems to be working

So, what are you all planning to do with all your lovely tomatoes??

The Tabbie Family; DH , DS , DD , a few :, a couple : and me.
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