Just "started stopping" shampooing--advice? - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 7 Old 10-29-2007, 01:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Sorry for the odd title. Couldn't think of a better way to put it.

I'm new here, this is my first post.

A couple of weeks ago, I decided to stop shampooing. I'd heard about the idea a few years back but never gave it too much thought. After one false start, I stopped shampooing over a week ago and am currently on day 10. I have waist length, fairly thick hair, but it has never been naturally oily. Even when I was shampooing, it was rarely more than twice a week. What gave me pause about the whole shampooing business is that I noticed that a shampoo I tried last year for "no frizzies" didn't leave my scalp feeling squeaky clean and dry like normal shampoos, yet my hair stayed cleaner one to two days longer than when it was "stripped" clean. This led me (finally) to try ditching shampooing.

What I am currently doing is, every couple of days, when my scalp starts to feel uncomfortable, I rub some corn starch in and then brush my hair out thoroughly with a boar's bristle brush. This seems to do the trick every time. I'm wondering how long I can keep that up? I don't know what made me think to use corn starch on my scalp but it just seemed to make sense--it absorbs oil and soothes my scalp so, why not? We took the kids swimming last week and afterwards, I rinsed my hair very thoroughly with water but skipped the shampooing step and went straight to my normal apple cider vinegar/distilled water rinse step. (I always use an apple cider vinegar and distilled water rinse after shampooing my hair because we have very hard water where I live). My hair felt great afterwards.

My questions are: How long can I continue to just use cornstarch instead of shampooing? Will using cornstarch to help with the mild "oilies" increase how long it takes for my scalp to naturally start regulating the sebum it produces? Should I rinse my hair with water (followed with the vinegar rinse) from time to time? Also, I would like to get my children off of shampoo. I hate the chemicals in shampoos and could make homemade shampoo but if no more shampooing can work for me, can't it work for them? My two youngest rarely need shampooing anyway as they are only 3.5 and 7. However, my oldest is starting to get that adolescent oily hair and she also swims up to three times a week. I'm not sure what to do about her hair. It is a longish short style and looks awful when not clean. I'd love some advice/suggestions but nothing complicated. We have enough chaos around here as it is and anything that isn't simple is doomed to failure.

Also, on a slightly different subject...anyone have any natural suggestions for facial cleansers? I have skin that tends to be dry but I still get spots, especially on my chin, which is never clear, because I have to pull out the many, many hairs that grow there (the bane of my existence). Expensive, chemical laden facial cleansers don't seem to help and the the microfibre, soap-free cloth I used for about six months only left my face feeling very dry and uncomfortable.

Thank you in advance for any and all suggestions.

intactlact.gif  Mum to five kids ages 16, 13, 9 and 4 years and baby K born 11/12!  And five angel babies angel1.gif
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#2 of 7 Old 10-29-2007, 02:23 PM
 
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Hmmm..I never heard of corn starch.
But I know that when I was doing no-poo I used baking soda (really dilluted in water) to wash, and diluted vinegar to rinse. I'm not sure how different corn starch would be...
I definitely noticed that with no-pooing, I could go longer with my hair not getting oily looking.
I got lazy though and stopped doing the bs no-poo thing. (I was using shampoo that didn't give that squeaky clean feeling though).
Right now, I'm trying a conditioner only no-poo thing. I have really short hair, but I learned about it on the long hair forums. (My scalp is really sensitive to shampoos, and itchy and somewhat dry)

I'm not sure about no-poo on younger kids. I'd be worried about getting vinegar in their eyes! There are a lot of great brands out there that don't use harsh chemicals (Aubrey, for one).

I've heard of people using honey to wash their face.
I use Desert Essence tea tree oil Thoroughly Clean face wash, and love it. It's the first face wash I've ever used that actually keeps me from getting pimples.

Becky, partner to Teague, SAHM to Keagan (7yo), Jonah (2yo)
 

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#3 of 7 Old 10-29-2007, 03:47 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I use the apple cider vinegar rinse to remove the hard water mineral build up on my hair. I started it about a year ago and it has made an incredible difference to my hair, which is now silky, soft and manageable where before it was dry and very frizzy. Does it have any "washing" properties? However, I would never use it on my little ones. My oldest daughter could use it if she chose, but she has short hair and doesn't have the problem of hard water mineral build up that my waist-length hair does.

The cornstarch I use dry. I just sprinkle it in my hair and then brush it out well. It takes care of the oily build up immediately and avoids my having to expose my hair to the stress of hard water and being wet. I assume even when one doesn't shampoo anymore, the scalp would still need washing with at least water regularly? Is water enough? Or do I need to find a shampoo alternative to keep my scalp healthy?

Someone mentioned honey for face and hair in another post. I'd heard of using honey as a moisturizer but not as a wash. I wonder, could this really work for children's hair? I also wonder if it wouldn't cause my face to break out worse or if it would help with dryness. I guess I can only know with trying. Would you just use it as you would a cleanser, massage it into the skin and the rinse??

I don't live in the US so don't know if I could find the brands you mention here. There are natural alternatives here but these can be expensive and I prefer to find natural alternatives in my kitchen wherever possible. However, if I could find a facial wash that actually helped prevent spots, I'd go to great lengths to get my hands on it!

Thanks for your response!

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#4 of 7 Old 10-29-2007, 04:03 PM
 
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You would need something the degrease your scalp from time to time, otherwise the sebum buildup can cause problems (like blocking follicles). Baking soda (also known as bicarb of soda or sodium bicarbonate) helps act like a soap to get rid of the sebum on your hair. It works really nice also mixed with a lightweight conditioner (doesn't condition much, just detangles hair, really) and it cleans your scalp. Anything cheap, like Suave or V05 works well. I personally use Suave Tropical Coconut, since coconut oil is good for hair and coconut oil is used in soaps, so it cleans a bit too.

Cornstarch just absorbs oils, but doesn't remove sebum buildup. You will need to wash your hair with something. Sebum buildup also leads to the unpleasant odor you will find on some people, that 'scalpy' odor that is very obnoxious and disgusting.

If baking soda doesn't suit you, you can use a natural shampoo that does not have much detergents in them, at least once a week.

Honey is moisturizing, but can be used as a facial wash. When it comes to hair, honey is still pretty moisturizing and probably wouldn't clean hair much because it has dirts/oils and heavy duty sebum. It would make hair look too limp and greasy, which most people don't like. It does well for skin though. Local/farmer's market raw honey is the best.
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#5 of 7 Old 10-29-2007, 04:16 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Spastica View Post
If baking soda doesn't suit you, you can use a natural shampoo that does not have much detergents in them, at least once a week.
I would not mind using baking soda, but I can't get it here. We have a box or two which we get from the US, but not enough that I could use it for my hair on a regular basis. Is there anything else I could use? Even natural shampoos tend to have some detergents and they can be quite pricey. Or perhaps a cheap shampoo, heavily diluted with water?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spastica View Post
Honey is moisturizing, but can be used as a facial wash. When it comes to hair, honey is still pretty moisturizing and probably wouldn't clean hair much because it has dirts/oils and heavy duty sebum. It would make hair look too limp and greasy, which most people don't like. It does well for skin though. Local/farmer's market raw honey is the best.
We have a lot of bee keepers here. I don't suppose it would be too difficult to find raw honey. I'd wondered if it mightn't be too moisturizing to use as a shampoo. I might give it a try on my face tonight, though.

Thank you!

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#6 of 7 Old 10-29-2007, 11:42 PM
 
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Hi Guen,

It sounds like what you are looking for might be either (a) washing with water only (WO) or maybe (b) NW, meaning no-water (using nothing at all on your hair, allowing it to transition to natural self-cleaning through brushing, combing and scalp stimulation, also called SO, meaning sebum-only.)

If one of these is what you want to try go to:

http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/...isplay.php?f=9

You will find active, pretty fun discussions of these methods of hair care. Some of those trying these methods end up with very good results, others never get out of the OO stage (otter in an oilslick.) Either way the experimenting is lots of fun!

Good luck with whatever you try!
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#7 of 7 Old 10-30-2007, 06:17 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by His Own View Post
Hi Guen,

It sounds like what you are looking for might be either (a) washing with water only (WO) or maybe (b) NW, meaning no-water (using nothing at all on your hair, allowing it to transition to natural self-cleaning through brushing, combing and scalp stimulation, also called SO, meaning sebum-only.)
Yes, this is the idea I was thinking of. Shampooing, conditioning and vinegar rinsing my hair, not to mention drying it (or waiting for it to dry) is such a tedious task that I wouldn't miss at all if I could eliminate it but still have healthy clean hair! I've heard that hair will self-clean naturally if given a chance but I'm not at all sure what is still required to care for it. Water? "Dry" cleaning it? Nothing at all?? This is a scary step for me however, because there are few things I can tolerate less than dirty hair. I HATE dirty hair.

Quote:
Originally Posted by His Own View Post
If one of these is what you want to try go to:

http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/...isplay.php?f=9

You will find active, pretty fun discussions of these methods of hair care. Some of those trying these methods end up with very good results, others never get out of the OO stage (otter in an oilslick.) Either way the experimenting is lots of fun!

Good luck with whatever you try!
Thanks so much for the info. I will check out that link!

intactlact.gif  Mum to five kids ages 16, 13, 9 and 4 years and baby K born 11/12!  And five angel babies angel1.gif
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