One more question on Tetanus - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 6 Old 07-17-2004, 12:09 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I know that Tetanus is anaerobic.

But what about the tetanus spores?

They are everywhere.

Can a person get tetanus from them?

Actually my husband just thought it through and he thinks a spore is like a seed. It needs the right condition to develop into a bacteria. And one of the conditions is an oxygen free environment, he surmises.

So, can a tetanus spore cause tetanus?

No, he says, no more than a tomato seed that's kept in the refrigerator can grow tomatoes.

Make sense to me.

So, if anyone ever tells you, well but the tetanus spores are everywhere, tell them they can't cause tetanus.

Or is he wrong? Feedback please.
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#2 of 6 Old 07-17-2004, 01:09 AM
 
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Actually-Yes tetanus spores (IF in anaerobic conditions & your body 's immune system is in poor shape) cause tetanus.
It is the toxins that the spores produce when the bacteria multiplies that cause the tetanus symptoms.

But I get what he means--the conditions have to be right.

They can be in your dust on your shelves even.
Wound care is essential-clean wounds well & make them bleed some to clean them out & make sure oxygen is there (in the blood supply)

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#3 of 6 Old 07-17-2004, 05:03 AM
 
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How do you make a wound bleed? What do you use to make sure it bleeds? Also, what happens with small cuts you don't notice that may go uncleaned for a while?
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#4 of 6 Old 07-17-2004, 11:33 AM
 
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I squeeze gently.
Like for a splinter---just to make sure it oozes a bit ,no way will it bleed profusely.

Clean it with soap & water or tea tree oil & water .

Small cuts that are surface only --usually do not penetrate to the layers of skin under the first couple & the areas heal up quickly.It is the deeper areas--or burns where damage //dead skin builds up & toxins get into the bloodstream & cause symptoms???
Burns & puncture wounds are 2 typical tetanus prone wounds.

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#5 of 6 Old 07-17-2004, 12:59 PM
 
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The main ingredient to cause the spore to germinate is WATER. It only needs water. The other conditions are needed to allow it to multiply, but water will take it from shriveled dry round eternal spore to reconstuted plump rod shaped bacteria, ready to go.

Think of the 'typical' tetanus injury: stepping on a rusty nail.

I've certainly done that before, so I can tell you what the wound looks like.
Even with a 1" penetration into the sole, there is no bleeding. There is visible rust and dirt in the wound, but it cannot be removed because you cannot make it bleed. The heavy callous and skin on the bottom of the foot, plus the pressure of walking seal the wound.
Mentioned above, a nasty burn could have similar situations.

These are the conditions of tetanus: the wound is dirty, and it is anerobic because there is little blood supply. Tetanus is dangerous not because of the infection, but because it releases a neurotoxin. A small amount of infection (causing only a small red spot) can produce enough toxin to kill. That strain of killer e. coli does the same thing, only aerobically and in the gut.
Botulism and Tetanus are in the same family, anerobic toxin producers, ubiquitous in our environment, that only need the proper environment to grow.
Also in that nasty family tree: gas gangrene and some uterine infections.

I give tetanus the same regard as botulism. I take a few precautions and don't worry about it.

I send my money to help aid agencies buy razor blades and umbilical clamps. Neonatal tetanus is still a large problem in the world. Dabbing the stump with dung is a common practice in many areas.

Did you know that many of us will have tetanus in our gut at some time? Rates have been recorded at as much as 25% of the population at a time. You have it and then you don't...it doesn't stick around. But that's how it gets in the soil, from the feces of animals.

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#6 of 6 Old 07-17-2004, 06:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Tetanus is very rare. Some one posted that in Australia, where few people get vaccinated against Tetanus, they had 7 or so cases of the disease in the last 10 yrs.

Can you immagine, in all of Australia. And that's a huge country. Anyway, 6 out of the victims were over 70 yrs. old, and the other was 58.

So that goes to show that tetanus is not a disease of young people whose blood supply is good and ready. Rather of someone who is old and has poor circulation.

Dr. Tenpenny in her video said Tetanus is a disease of old, diabetic, Japanes horse farmers. And the rest of us just don't get it very easily. So, I will not worry about it any longer.
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