Life After Waldorf ~ A Support Group - Page 33 - Mothering Forums

 5Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#961 of 1208 Old 05-11-2009, 03:56 PM
 
AngelBee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: New Brighton, MN
Posts: 19,261
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by beansavi View Post
OMG! *pant pant*

:

I just got a (mistaken) pm saying someone loved this thread but it is now closed.

WHEW!

They were looking at the old one.

OMG!!!!!!!!!!!

I just found you guys again.

I could not remember what forum you were in :

Mama to 10 so far:Mother of Joey (23), Dominick (15), Abigail (13), Angelo (10), Mylee (8), Delainey (6), Colton (4), ID girls Dahniella and Nicolette (2 in July), and Baby 10 coming sometime in July 2015.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
  If evolution were true, mothers would have three arms!
AngelBee is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#962 of 1208 Old 05-13-2009, 09:19 PM
 
karne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 3,558
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi there..........some of us are infrequently around. I'm happy, very happy to say that my sense is that many of us have been able to get to good, healthy and happy places for our kids and families after waldorf.

There should be a reunion post at some point to tell these happy stories!
karne is offline  
#963 of 1208 Old 05-14-2009, 12:19 AM
 
orangewallflower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 394
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Jalilah, I'm so sorry to hear that the transition was so rough. Good for you son for getting through it!
orangewallflower is offline  
 
#964 of 1208 Old 05-20-2009, 01:29 PM
 
Amy Kaur's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NY
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just quit after 3 yrs of being and early childhood assistant due to the abusive, controlling behavior of the new first year teacher I was paired with in Nov. because the school couldn't find an assistant she was willing to work with...(Her first one already quit!)

I did it after school yesterday....I feel a load has been lifted, but I am very angry and hurt. I'm glad I found this group. I need to do some healing as no one at the school wanted to take any steps to help this new teacher (and they'd heard plenty of complaints already)

HI everyone!!
Amy Kaur is offline  
#965 of 1208 Old 05-26-2009, 01:05 PM
 
ravenna206's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Inbetween a rock and a hard place
Posts: 159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Welcome Amy, I hope you find this thread useful. I know it has really helped me when I decided to leave.
ravenna206 is offline  
#966 of 1208 Old 05-27-2009, 06:33 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,521
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
How do you let go of the guilt once you leave Waldorf?

We are actually Waldorfish unschoolers, but to get ideas I have in the past hung out in traditional Waldorf circles. After butting heads too many times, I have decided to cut ties with these people, but I constantly have those feelings of judgment still. For instance, we are a TV-free family at home but sometimes when dd goes to grandma's house they will watch a nature or cooking show together. This doesn't happen often so it shouldn't be a big deal, but I just hear all of those Waldorf voices telling me that my child will be forever corrupted. Also, I am still angry about past judgment of my dd's toys. FTR, we buy open-ended toys but do not limit ourselves to just natural materials. I have actually spent a lot of time and thought into the toys we have either bought or made her, so I know I probably take this issue a bit too personally. But, honestly, to hear some of these people's reactions you'd think that Schleich animals should be sent to the ninth circle of Dante's Inferno. I know these people are wrong in their judgment, but I feel a sense of non-closure, like I want to make them see that they are wrong and make them apologize or something. Of course, I'm not going to do that as it wouldn't work. I think it's safe to admit here in this thread that I think Waldorf can be rather brain-washing and no matter how much common sense you try and insert into an argument it always ends with "Well, Steiner says . . .". I want to just enjoy our lives but I still see in my head these Waldorf moms all wearing the same clogs and knitting away while feeling so smug and proud that they aren't like me. How do you let go?

Allison:  a little bit Waldorf, a little bit Medievalish, and always"MOMMMMYYYY!" to sweet Cecily since 12.22.05
LuxPerpetua is offline  
#967 of 1208 Old 05-27-2009, 07:18 PM
 
ravenna206's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Inbetween a rock and a hard place
Posts: 159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well LuxPerpetua,
I would like to say it happens over nite but it really doesn't. My dd has been out of W for 2 years (boy it seems like forever now) and the first year is the toughest. It's like dealing with the death of a family member anger, guilt, etc... It does get easier and I do run into them a lot. Now they are just people that I feel sorry for because they are no better than I. For the older teacher's the stress from all the disfunction shows. Seriously I ran into one of the teacher's who was really B and I had to laugh to myself. She look like she had aged 10 years and it had been only a year since I last ran into her. I truly feel sorry because they've put Steiner on a pedestal and can't realize he was just a man.
You should happy that you aren't like them. That you are an individual who is free to do as she please and doesn't have to answer to anyone but yourself.
Give it time, it will happen.
ravenna206 is offline  
#968 of 1208 Old 05-29-2009, 08:09 PM
 
mermaidmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: California
Posts: 245
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi! I haven't had a chance to read thru this whole thread but, I wanted to say thank you for posting your stories.

I do have a question....if ws is christian based, why are new age/pagan thoughts and practices incorporated into it so heavily?
mermaidmama is offline  
#969 of 1208 Old 05-29-2009, 09:30 PM
 
orangewallflower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 394
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I wouldn't call it Christian based so much as anthroposophically based. Anthroposophy is an esoteric form of Christianity and like the theosophy that Steiner spun it off from, it incorporates what he views as the universal wisdom of other belief systems.
orangewallflower is offline  
#970 of 1208 Old 05-29-2009, 11:24 PM
 
mermaidmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: California
Posts: 245
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
oh ok thanks for clarifying that.
mermaidmama is offline  
#971 of 1208 Old 05-30-2009, 10:18 AM
 
karne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 3,558
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I second everythining Ravenna says! LuxPerpetua the first year is truly the most difficult, in my experience. We're now also in our second year as well, and neither dh and I, or the kids miss it a bit. The judgement, still, from people we run into, or stay in contact with, is really amazing. I know exactly what you mean about everyone looking, sounding the same, reading the same things, eating the same foods, on and on and on. I think closure and perspective will come with time. New friends, new circles perhaps? Good luck. I know it's hard and frustrating. And you're right-brainwashing is a word I'd use as well.
karne is offline  
#972 of 1208 Old 05-31-2009, 01:31 AM
 
mermaidmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: California
Posts: 245
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
sorry...another question

Anthroposophy, a spiritual philosophy based on the teachings of Rudolf Steiner....

So, where did he get his info from? How does he back up his theories? Where's his evidence?

It just weirds me out when one person/group etc. claims to have all the answers.
mermaidmama is offline  
#973 of 1208 Old 05-31-2009, 01:54 AM
 
orangewallflower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 394
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh, boy, those are big questions, mermaidmama! He wrote an autobiography which can give you an idea of where he got it from. If you believe that there is a spiritual world, his ideas might make sense to you. His evidence is his own spiritual journey, and to understand it you must embark on your own spiritual path. (To be clear, I have not done this. I believe in human spirituality, but I believe it is something entirely within us and created by us, so Steiner's work does not make sense to me.) I do believe that there are posters on this thread that have worked through anthroposophy extensively. If you are interested, I do recommend that you read the thread. It takes time, but it helps to know where people are coming from. There is also a now closed thread on the Waldorf subform. Just put "safe healthy haven" in the search window, and that will take you back to the beginning.
orangewallflower is offline  
#974 of 1208 Old 06-01-2009, 02:38 PM
 
ravenna206's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Inbetween a rock and a hard place
Posts: 159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think Steiner spoke with the dead if I remember properly and I never have really read anything of his. I find it like running around a tree trying to catch yourself. So this is what my friends have told me or reinterpretation because he uses his own language. As a mom I just didn't have time to sit there and study which is what it is like. So the dead spoke to him and told him all about how things are. That children who are mentally handicap aren't really children at all (which for me really struck at note), they are like sub human. That was from a lecture where he had a little girl or boy standing there to supposedly prove his point. That she was soulless and as a higher beings we need to help guide her.
I find his stuff totally fictional like Piers Anthony who in his books describes 7 or 10 different levels of hell. If he had not believed soooo much in these teaching he would have made a great science fiction writer.
I really never saw proof that his way was the best way. Living, eating, dressing, judging, will put you on the best path to enlightenment. If anything it made me feel like a judgmental fraud. Not someone who I wanted to really be. I know the teacher's seem all nice and sweet but once you've been there a while you hear all the odd things that Steiner wrote come out.
That's my 2 cents!
ravenna206 is offline  
#975 of 1208 Old 06-01-2009, 10:32 PM
 
mermaidmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: California
Posts: 245
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Wow. All he had to back himself up was his "journey" and claim that he talked to the dead?!

Thanks for answering my questions
mermaidmama is offline  
#976 of 1208 Old 06-02-2009, 04:39 PM
 
orangewallflower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 394
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Mermaidmama, you would, of course, get a much different sort of answer from a Waldorf educator and/or an anthroposophist, and I encourage to keep on asking questions if you are still interested in Waldorf. It would be fine to start a thread on this in the Waldorf forum.
orangewallflower is offline  
#977 of 1208 Old 06-04-2009, 12:14 AM
 
summermay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: music land
Posts: 246
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi to all,
and thanks for the long threads which alerted us to some issues that might arise in the Waldorf school setting.

Actually we were quite fascinated by the whole Waldorf concept and artsy, warm, familiar environment (or what we projected into it).

And can you believe it- there were red flags after just one free introductory session, a parent-child class.

There was this "strong-willed" child situation, one boy dominating the group, no boundaries, the younger children virtually "bullied" and dominated with the acceptance (I would not say approval, but it was accepted, he was also the child of one of the board members) of the teacher and other parents.
The younger ones were often crying because they were just "rushed" over or their toys were taken away by the boy.

Sadly this is the only school nearby so it seems we will only have a waldorfy home right now. Or do you think there is any chance to change this situation? Our dc was luckily not a victim as being one head taller but still this situation does not go out of my head.

The admissions officer called and asked if we would like to continue the classes and later on fulltime.

Whilst we were waiting to follow the teacher to the most beautiful classroom with a wonderful array of wooden toys, chrystals and a lovely play section, older children were singing tradional songs, it was so surreal and beautiful (like at home with my grandparents).


Thank you for being able to share this.
Summer

Vegmum:Hedding::: treehugger::
summermay is offline  
#978 of 1208 Old 06-04-2009, 02:10 AM
 
orangewallflower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 394
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Did you talk to the admissions officer about your experience? What did he or she say?
orangewallflower is offline  
#979 of 1208 Old 06-04-2009, 03:59 AM
 
summermay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: music land
Posts: 246
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Good question.
The admission officer and early years teacher are good friends so I do not think it would be good to bring this issue up to her.
The other parents in the parentchildclass have all elder siblings in the small school, so I would assume that a talk to the officer ( I have thought about it) would only bring conflict.
They have apparently a bit of funding problems, not enough pupils anymore and try to open up more for the public.

Generally, they all were very welcomming and friendly towards dc and me and all were asking if we would return next week. They initially had 3 pc classes, it's now only one left.

There was another thing which was slightly strange, all children were given a wooden plant to play with except dc who received a plastic woortel/carrot. I have read several Waldorf education books and ground roots were not so favoured, but maybe I am just overinterpretating.

btw sorry for my English

Vegmum:Hedding::: treehugger::
summermay is offline  
#980 of 1208 Old 06-04-2009, 04:04 AM
 
summermay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: music land
Posts: 246
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
sorry forgot to add

plus: open to the public for festivals, also open to a bit of crunchiness
minus: classroom atmosphere/management

Maybe I just should check out the class teacher if she has a better, more developed teaching approach, but then you are not present as a parent during their classes.

Vegmum:Hedding::: treehugger::
summermay is offline  
#981 of 1208 Old 06-07-2009, 10:58 AM
 
sapphire_chan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 27,052
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by summermay View Post
Good question.
The admission officer and early years teacher are good friends so I do not think it would be good to bring this issue up to her.
:This is a huge red flag in any school.

(red flag: warning sign that something is very wrong)
sapphire_chan is offline  
#982 of 1208 Old 06-08-2009, 04:58 PM
 
Laurelsprings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well, we have decided not to send our child to local Waldorf charter for kindergarten.

Upon investigation, we discovered this school has many of the same issues discussed over and over again on this thread...bullying issues, children being publicly shamed, poor supervision, former families being shunned, etc.

I am disappointed and scrambling to find an alternative for my child, but am also so very grateful for the posters here who tipped me off to these issues. I feel like I have almost had a taste of what others here have gone through- just through the admissions process! My gut has been telling me (literally- I have thrown up over it) to "get out" and I am so relieved that we are getting out now instead of later.

Thank you!
Laurelsprings is offline  
#983 of 1208 Old 06-08-2009, 05:21 PM
 
karne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 3,558
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I can't remember laurelsprings, if your child was in ws previously? Anyway, on behalf of those who have BTDT, you've most likely saved yourself a lot of grief. If you were seeing issues in through the admissions process that's definitely a problem.

I think for those of us who are looking for something specific for our child/children, we make it happen! Once you are settled into a schooling option you will make it your own. I'm sorry that this has been so unsettling for you, and I wish you peace as you find what works for you.
karne is offline  
#984 of 1208 Old 06-08-2009, 08:42 PM
 
orangewallflower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 394
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm sorry that the school didn't turn out to be what you were hoping, Laurelsprings, and that the process was so agonizing. Do you have a default option?
orangewallflower is offline  
#985 of 1208 Old 06-09-2009, 12:50 PM
 
Laurelsprings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks Karne and Orangewallflower for your encouragement.

DC is currently in a Reggio preschool. I wish there was a local Reggio Kinder option for us, but there isn't. I thought Waldorf style would be complementary to Reggio, but it really doesn't seem to be much like my initial impressions at all. I have registered DC for a small neighborhood public elementary that I am starting to get excited about. I just regret that my "blinders" about the Waldorf kept me from really exploring other options...but I do think this other school will be a good place.

Luckily, DC has a personality type that could do great in all different kinds of school environments. I think everything is going to be fine, and again thanks to those here who have shared their experiences...it was because of you that I started to ask more questions about our local Waldorf and I think you all have saved this family a lot of angst.
Laurelsprings is offline  
#986 of 1208 Old 06-16-2009, 10:37 AM
 
aikigypsy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 802
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi! I'm part of a parent-toddler group that is working towards starting a Steiner kindergarten. We started going to the group because a friend of mine mentioned it. Now, pretty much all of my mommy-buddies are in this group, and they're a wonderful, nice group of people, but I often feel lie I'm the only one there who isn't 100% enthusiastic about Steiner-Waldorf education, so I'm here to vent about my doubts.

Yesterday, we went on a field trip to a Steiner school about an hour and a half from here. It was a lovely day out but did nothing to allay my concerns. DD (18 months old, now) loved the school. She borrowed the rain pants and splashed in buckets and climbed all over the climbing frames. It made me feel how much we're missing out on being in nature and outdoors, since we live in the middle of a small city. Inside the school buildings was another matter. I just sensed that it was a very rigid place in some ways, and that the spiritual component doesn't sit quite right with me... maybe because it's too much fairytales and candles, and not enough interpersonal/social ethics.

Lots of what I've encountered in this group makes me want to homeschool (although I know that ultimately I don't want to homeschool full-time or long-term), or to use elements of the Stiener program to supplement regular school education. I'd like to have lots of regular free outdoor play time, use natural materials as much as possible, and do crafts with DD (and any more children that come along... hoping for at least one more) through elementary school age, because they're things that I did as a kid and could have done with more of, and I do think that art/crafts and lots of time in nature are important developmentally. But I don't want to be a founding member of a Steiner school... and yet these are my friends and I really like hanging out with them, and doing the playgroup with them.

There's no real practical question for me at this point, because DD is still too young for preschool and we're planning to move soon, but I just wanted to vent a bit.
aikigypsy is offline  
#987 of 1208 Old 06-16-2009, 03:10 PM
 
LizD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: with all the madmen
Posts: 2,292
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You hit the nail on the head with the comment about what you are missing out on living in a city (not that you can't have a happy and healthy life in the city!): people seek Waldorf schools because they feel something missing, especially when they have very young children, in modern life. You can cultivate that in your life no matter where your children go to school, and in fact do your child and others a service by being a member of the broader community rather than only associating with people who share your views or a narrow common vision.

I just did a puppet show for my son's fifth birthday, and for various reasons this was a slapdash production! None of my guests were Waldorf people. I knew how awkward and provincial my show was compared to some of the magical Waldorf puppet shows I've seen (and done, as a teacher). But the parents and my little guests were thrilled and impressed. To the children, a puppet show is a puppet show. It was every bit as magical, and to the parents it was neat I would do such a thing at a simple little party. Then the children made their own fuzzy sock puppets from that kit you can buy at Target with self-stick felt bits and eyes (hardly Waldorf!) and without being prompted put on their own "puppet show." The results for the children are the same, and no one is worried about whether the "gesture" of the story I chose is appropriate for four-and five-year-olds or upset that the felt is not 100% wool, or that there's some sinister spiritual implication in that Josephine put several eyes on her puppet.

Hopefully you will still be able to hang out with your friends and be a part of the broader community without joining in their endeavor...unfortunately in my own experience starting or participating in a Waldorf school can bring out the worst in people- it certainly did in me.

In looking for a school for my own little boy now, I wistfully remember how enthusiastic I was about moving so my daughter, ten years ago, could attend a Waldorf kindergarten. Nowhere is the fable of "The Emperor's New Clothes" more evident than in Waldorf education.

Once you get used to the aesthetic of a Waldorf school, other schools can seem cluttered and jarring (and many of them are). But when our first experiment with Waldorf went wrong, and my first-grader visited a public Montessori school, she filled up like a plant getting water when she saw all the *stuff* in the classroom. I find Montessori schools could use a little dose of Waldorf decorating, but the point is there's a balance between tidy and cluttered- and cluttered isn't necessarily bad. I was just considering this the other day when my father-in-law, whose wife is a *meticulous* housekeeper, privately commented to me that he loved the clutter in our house, that it meant that people lived and worked and read and cooked there. You are quite right in your perception that the material environment at a Waldorf school is rigid.
LizD is offline  
#988 of 1208 Old 06-16-2009, 08:51 PM
 
orangewallflower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 394
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Have you voiced your concerns to the group? I wonder if there are others thinking exactly the same thing, but don't feel comfortable talking about it. If this group is willing to put the work into founding a school, perhaps it could be something completely independant and defined by the founding parents. You can come to agreement on what you love about Waldorf, and apply those elements (plenty of time for outside play, lazured walls, crafts...) without attempting to do pure Waldorf. I think this would be a dream school for many people!
orangewallflower is offline  
#989 of 1208 Old 06-17-2009, 06:31 AM
 
aikigypsy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 802
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It's funny. I have voiced my concerns to a couple of my friends, and they seem to more or less agree, but we seem to be unable to have a group discussion about it. I think it's hard because most of them are eager to join onto an existing system, and feel that we need the institutional support of the Steiner Kindergarten association, so they're signing on for the workshops, etc.

It's possible that once we've moved a little further along in the process they'll be able to get some distance from the central organization, but right now the group seems bent on being Steiner, rather than just drawing from the Steiner-Waldorf curriculum.
aikigypsy is offline  
#990 of 1208 Old 06-17-2009, 01:31 PM
 
ravenna206's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Inbetween a rock and a hard place
Posts: 159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by aikigypsy View Post
need the institutional support of the Steiner Kindergarten association, so they're signing on for the workshops, etc.
I had to laugh at the this because the support is very lacking when it comes to support from outside your own school. Our school was visited many times by AWSNA and our system never met their standards.
I know in this thread someone mention another school of thought that was like Waldorf but didn't have the same dysfunctional style. I can't remember what is was called. I wonder if that would help divert the thoughts from being so hung up on Steiner's work.
ravenna206 is offline  
Reply


User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

Online Users: 12,886

35 members and 12,851 guests
bananabee , cadence.clair , Childrenareawesome , Dakotacakes , Deborah , emmy526 , girlspn , Hopeful2017 , jamesmorrow , JHardy , kathymuggle , lab , Leelee3 , lhargrave89 , LibraSun , Looseseal , Lucee , mama24-7 , manyhatsmom , moominmamma , MountainMamaGC , NaturallyKait , oversoul86 , RollerCoasterMama , samaxtics , scaramouche131 , sciencemum , Shmootzi , Skippy918 , Springshowers , sren , Xerxella , Zilver
Most users ever online was 449,755, 06-25-2014 at 12:21 PM.