Please read my question & help me understand Halloween & it's activities from non-Christians. - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 21 Old 10-31-2010, 03:06 PM - Thread Starter
 
danalyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Northern Minnesota
Posts: 81
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi, I'm posting this with true sincerity. I'm not looking to start a debate between those who do NOT "do" Halloween and those who love it.... I am searching for info on Halloween..... I need to hear from "real life" people (Pagans, Witches, non-Christians) about what Halloween means to them & how it is celebrated. Is it celebrated differently depending on whether you are a Witch, a Pagan, or a Wiccan? Or if you are an atheist, or agonistic, or ect? Also, the Halloween customs that have been adapted (or whatever) into American Christianity, how close to the real thing are they? I'm not sure if I worded that question right. I am not trying to be offensive in the least, nor am I being judgemental. I am sincerely looking for information on how this holiday & the days surrounding it are celebrated. I am hoping for a lot of responses.
Thank you so much. )
danalyn is offline  
#2 of 21 Old 10-31-2010, 03:57 PM
 
PGTlatte's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Chicago far NWS
Posts: 1,991
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
To me, it's a fun fall holiday for kids. I avoid any of the super scary of violent aspects of it. I read books about fall, and harvest, and fun Halloween books. This year we are reading Halloween Is.... by Gail Gibbons. It does have bit of history of the origin of Halloween and the traditions we associate with it. We will also read Zen Ghosts by Jon J Muth. The inside of our house is decorated with fun stuff. We carved pumpkins this morning. During the weeks leading up to Halloween, I take my kids to a local pumpkin farm that is set up as a seasonal attraction. On Friday they made pictures with foam stickers - a spooky looking house, jack-o-lanterns, ghosts, spiders, and a moon, arranged on a piece of black paper. I keep it a fun and silly observance of fall with a bit of history thrown in.

DS1 March 2003DS2 Sept 2005,
and 3 , in our happy secular
PGTlatte is offline  
#3 of 21 Old 10-31-2010, 04:39 PM
 
BlueLeaf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Colorado
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm Pagan, and Halloween/Samhain is the ultimate family holiday. Not only is it fun, with junk food and dressing up and parties, but it's also when we honor our families, specifically those who have passed on, The Beloved Dead. We recognize that standing behind us in a near-infinite line of people without whom we would not exist.
BlueLeaf is offline  
#4 of 21 Old 10-31-2010, 04:54 PM
 
Daffodil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 3,602
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by danalyn View Post
Also, the Halloween customs that have been adapted (or whatever) into American Christianity, how close to the real thing are they?
What exactly do you mean by "the real thing?" What are "real" Halloween customs to you? Very old customs? Customs that are most common today? Customs that originated among non-Christians?

I'm an atheist, and what Halloween means to me is probably pretty similar to what it means to most people in the US. I think of it mostly as a kids' holiday, a chance for them to dress up and collect candy, and maybe think about scary stuff and scare themselves a little by visiting "haunted houses" and the like. It can also be an excuse for adults to have a party, dress up and act silly, if they're so inclined. To me, it has nothing at all to do with religion. It's not a Christian holiday; it's not an anti-Christian holiday; it's all just for fun.
Daffodil is offline  
#5 of 21 Old 10-31-2010, 11:12 PM
 
Magelet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 2,702
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
well, I'm non christian, however I'm jewish not pagan.

Halloween is a fun secular holiday to me. trick or treating for kids when we have them, costumes for kids when we have them, costumes for us if we feel like and can afford them. (this year no costumes as we didn't have a place to wear them and didn't have the money to make them for no reason). we had a blast carving pumpkins, and have been eating winter squash and other fall veggies all week.

Caroline, partner to J, post partum doula, kitchen manager, aspiring midwife, soon to be nursing student, mama to my furbaby, someday a mama to not so furry munchkins, G-d willing
Magelet is offline  
#6 of 21 Old 11-01-2010, 12:08 AM - Thread Starter
 
danalyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Northern Minnesota
Posts: 81
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daffodil View Post
What exactly do you mean by "the real thing?" What are "real" Halloween customs to you? Very old customs? Customs that are most common today? Customs that originated among non-Christians?
That's an entirely fair/good question... I'm sitting here asking myself what exactly I meant by that. What I meant, I believe, is how close to the original/very old customs. for example, I have searched on the internet the "origins of halloween" http://www.history.com/topics/halloween
and i'm trying to figure out how halloween of today in the US (in case it's dif. elsewhere) fits the original "description" of it. I'm also wondering if Halloween is a religious holiday to those who practice witchcraft, paganism. I'm also looking into all souls day, and all saints day. thank you to those who have responded to my post so far. I appreciate it and am sincerely on the quest for lots of info, and only to apply it to my family's life, and mine.
danalyn is offline  
#7 of 21 Old 11-01-2010, 03:14 AM
 
Petie1104's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Arizona
Posts: 415
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magelet View Post
well, I'm non christian, however I'm jewish not pagan.

Halloween is a fun secular holiday to me. trick or treating for kids when we have them, costumes for kids when we have them, costumes for us if we feel like and can afford them. (this year no costumes as we didn't have a place to wear them and didn't have the money to make them for no reason). we had a blast carving pumpkins, and have been eating winter squash and other fall veggies all week.
We actually had them wear their costumes from Purim this year. We didn't have the funds to buy them new ones.

We are much the same, trick or treating, carving pumpkins etc. Completely secular, but lots of fun.

Wife to dh since 1999, stepmom to dss (13 yrs. old)jammin.gif, mom to ds (9 yrs. old)bikenew.gif, dd (7 yrs. old)bouncy.gif, and ds (4 yrs. old)sleepytime.gif
Petie1104 is offline  
#8 of 21 Old 11-01-2010, 03:35 AM
 
eclipse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Mexico
Posts: 7,867
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm an atheist. It doesn't hold any meaning to me beyond a fun day for the kids to dress up and trick or treat. I also consider it the start of the fall/winter festivities that include Thanksgiving, Yule/Christmas, and New Years. Sometimes we do pumpkins, though we didn't this year. I live in Mexico, so the next couple of days will be the big days for most people around here (though kids also go "tricky-tricky" as they say here!) as All Souls Day, All Saints Day, and Dia de los Muertos. We're not Catholic and don't have any family buried here, so we don't really celebrate that beyond buying or making pan de muertos and sugar skulls.
eclipse is offline  
#9 of 21 Old 11-01-2010, 05:42 PM
 
wombatclay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: running the red queen's race
Posts: 14,143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Pagan here! First off, yes... "pagan" is a really big umbrella term that covers many many different paths. And just like the "christian" umbrella covers groups that are radically different in their particulars and traditions, different pagan groups ceelebrate holiday in different ways and for different reasons. There's the whole joke about asking ten pagans and getting 20 answers!

For your next question about "real" traditions... I think you may be hitting up against what I call the Holiday vs Holy Day divide. For example, the religious meaning and celebration of Christmas (a Holy Day) differs from the secular or family traditions that surround Christmas (the Holiday) even though both are happening at the same time. So it can be confusing to tease apart what is "holy day" and what is "holiday". Which is what I think you might be asking? How close are the "holiday" traditions of Halloween to the "holy day" traditions that surround the period of time at the end of October/beginning of November (often but not always called Samhain by those pagan umbrella folk)?

While I think the answer to that depends on the specific pagan religion (remembering that pagan groups vary as much as christian groups do, if not more ), I can describe our Samhain Holy Day beliefs/traditions.

We're Druids (ADF style) with a Norse hearth culture. That means we celebrate Samhain as a type of harvest festival. While there is a "vegetable/grain" harvest a bit earlier in the year, the end of October tends more to a "meat" harvest. In an agricultural society a decision needed to be made about how many of the livestock could be fed through the winter... diviners and elders would read the signs and hope they'd judged the season correctly (hence the emphasis on divination at this time of year), then tell the community "Long winter ahead, butcher more livestock" or "short winter, keep the livestock". If they got this wrong there could be serious fall out... butcher too many and then have a short winter and you've wasted your resources/limited the amount you can achieve in the next year BUT get hit with a longer winter than expected and your livestock will starve and that's a much bigger deal.

One way or the other, food would be plentiful, butchering and conserving meat and supplies would be well under way, the focus would be on the family and the community while at the same time there would be a very visible reminder of life/death. I don't know if you live in hunting country, but around here the hunters will be putting up deer on their porches soon... which makes for a pretty obvious reminder of the whole "circle of life". Anyway, this all lends itself to a focus on family past and present and future, a realization of life in death and death in life, a bountiful harvest table with the knowledge of lean times to come. Sort of a balanced, see-saw, season of thanksgiving.

And in our religion (again, ADF style druidry with a focus on Irish and Norse history/culture) the focus on family past and present plays out in various ways... we make an altar and decorate it with reminders of family and friends who have died. We make a meal with favorite foods that remind us of those loved ones and leave a little of the food from that meal outside on our offering table. We also leave out gifts for our unknown ancestors, for the spirits that will accompany us through the year (for example, the spirit of Deer and Turkey and Pig that will be butchered so that we will have food during the winter), and for the gods. We meditate and contemplate and read omens that give us an idea of where the coming year will take us... pesonally I draw a few tarot cards, remember my family and friends who have passed on, put in our order for the meat CSA, and remind my kiddos that it is no longer safe to wander the woods around our home (even in blaze orange).

In terms of the secular holiday aspect... we go trick or treating, we carve pumpkins, we toast pumpkin seeds and eat more chocolate in one night than we do the rest of the year combined. We go to the "pumpkin party" at my dd1's waldorf school and sing songs about silly witches flying over ditches.

I've probably rambled right past your original questions but... Yes, Samhain is a religious holy day in many pagan traditions. It's purpose and meaning vary but are generally related to harvest, the new year, family past and present, death/rebirth, and divination. In modern American culture there are secular holiday traditions that mirror or grow from these holy day traditions. And...ummmm... I talk too much!

Be pretty! Be practical! Be Pagan! Visit Pagan Hearth & Home!
 mama to lady.gif(4/05), hearts.gif(6/07vbac), diaper.gif(8/09vbac), and babygirl.gif (9/11vbac)

wombatclay is offline  
#10 of 21 Old 11-01-2010, 05:50 PM
 
rhiOrion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 4,229
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Agnostic here.

To me it's just a fun holiday. Not even a "kids'" holiday as many say, just fun. I think I have as much fun on Halloween as most kids. Any excuse to dress up, gather together, and eat candy is good in my book!

FWIW, I also celebrate Christmas for non-religious reasons.

Hippie sympathizer and mom to L, 4.8.10.
Pet-mom to Squirt with FLUTD & Maya the deaf wonder dog .
rhiOrion is offline  
#11 of 21 Old 11-01-2010, 07:07 PM
 
Maiasaura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Here, because I'm not all there.
Posts: 5,097
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Pagan here, too! Wiccan/Witch specifically.

What Clay said. And I forgot about the witches flying over ditches song! DS(9) used to sing that in preschool!

I see Samhain (pronounced SOW-when, as in rhymes with COW-when, not Sam Hain, for those who didn't know) as a time to honor our ancestors, both recent and long-past. DS and I talk about our origins. Every year seems to bring specific ones into focus. This year it happened to be our Mayflower ancestors (specifically William Bradford), and my father.

We don't Do a whole lot of extra stuff like Clay's family. Even though ds self-identifies as Pagan, he's not into ritual or any of the "trappings" of our religion. He's more of a "I honor all the Gods of all religions" but way secular as far as holidays go.

We did visit the cool huge downtown graveyard this year. He and his best friend romped around, I took photos, and the other kid's mama and I wandered and talked and looked at the graves. If I'd been alone, I probably would have sat and meditated for awhile. I may yet do that, tomorrow, as tomorrow's All Soul's, isn't it? I think?

So, for the winter holiday, we honor Yule/Solstice on Solstice Day. Our family tradition is to make a Sun Bread (a'la the book by Elisa Kleven) and get up before sunrise. We quietly wait, then when the Sun rises, we throw some up to the Sun, with sparkling cider and whooping and hollering and cheering. Then we go in and relax and later we have a Feast.
Christmas, for us, is the commercial gift-giving extravaganza. This year we'll be spending it with my mom. We'll probably go to church (Episcopalian) with her, since Christmas falls on a Saturday. Then after Christmas I will be visiting my love, who is Catholic. We may go to his church but maybe not. I like to think I honor the Divine in all religions

Anyway. HTH.

Me treehugger.gif Handfasted wife to M  geek.gif as of 3/7/10 , and Mama to R  reading.gif (1/31/01) luxlove.gif

Maiasaura is offline  
#12 of 21 Old 11-01-2010, 09:17 PM
 
Thao's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Washington state
Posts: 2,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Buddhist here. I see Halloween as our take on the European version of the harvest celebration, which pretty much all cultures celebrate in some form or other. In China and Vietnam for example it is called the mid-autumn festival and involves lanterns, treats, children parading down the street, and then listening to adults tell stories while gazing at the full moon (because the mid-autumn festival is always when the moon is full). It's not so different from our Halloween.

One difference of course is Halloween's emphasis on death and dark forces, which I've never seen in the mid-autumn festival celebrations. In "The Golden Bough" - a classic history of ancient religious myth and customs - it describes a lot of European harvest rituals that involved play-acting various scenes of death as a way of recognizing the death of the soil's fertility and enabling it's future regeneration. So perhaps Halloween's emphasis on death developed out of the extremely ancient belief of the Goddess as the source of death and rebirth; Goddess-worship certainly thrived for a very long time in Europe. I only have a vague recollection about all this as I read the book a long time ago, but if you are interested in researching the old traditions that might be a place to start. It is not specifically about Halloween but goes into various ancient customs in great detail.

One thing I do remember from the book is the continuous thread that flows from one culture or era to the next in the way myths and customs develop. I doubt there is any "original" Halloween. You will always be able to trace it back to an earlier tradition.

On a lighter note, I love Halloween as a fun opportunity to dress up and celebrate harvesttime!
Thao is offline  
#13 of 21 Old 11-01-2010, 10:01 PM
 
Amatullah0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 905
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We're Muslim, and we don't celebrate non-muslim holidays, including halloween. Our religion expressly forbids witchcraft, and because of that, we stay as far away from anything that resembles(or celebrates) it. We don't even do trick-or-treating, or halloween parties, but at this point in DS's life, we don't refuse if someone offers him halloween candy, though we will tell the person who says "happy halloween" or asks "what are you gonna be for halloween" that we don't celebrate halloween.

hijab.gif Childbirth Educating and Doula-ing wife toflowersforyou.gif , and mama to hammer.gif6/09. Story of my life:buddamomimg1.pngduh.gif knit.gifscared.gifsewmachine.gifdishes.gifcd.giftea6.gifread.gifsleepytime.gif

 

Amatullah0 is offline  
#14 of 21 Old 11-01-2010, 10:09 PM
 
MeepyCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 3,669
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
I'm a NeoPagan, non-Wiccan agnostic.

I love Halloween because it's one of a very few celebrations that connect us to our neighbors. I think there's a strong tendency in U.S. culture right now for people to connect on the basis of shared interests at the expense of connections based on shared locations. I love that I can log on to the internet and find a special discussion group for Keeping Your Ferret From Destroying Your Yarn Stash After the Twins are Born - October!, but I often think it would be better if I was more connected to Parents who Live on My Block and Sometimes Go to the Park on Tuesday.

I protest at the suggestion that Trick or Treating isn't a "real tradition." Depending who you believe about this stuff, Trick or Treating may predate Drawing Down the Moon. And neither of these things is fake.
MeepyCat is offline  
#15 of 21 Old 11-02-2010, 12:01 AM
 
Linda on the move's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: basking in the sunshine
Posts: 10,546
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeepyCat View Post
I love Halloween because it's one of a very few celebrations that connect us to our neighbors.
totally agree.

I've no idea what to call my religious views. I've been a practicing Buddhist and a practicing pagan, and now don't observe any religion, but I meditate and I believe everyone is praying to the same god, we just understand that power differently.

Anyway, I love that for one day, children get to be anything they want. I love that it's safe to take candy from strangers. I love watching my husband and children carve pumpkins together. I love that everyone goes out after dark and walks around and talks. I love that I get to give something, however small, to children I might not every see again.

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

Linda on the move is online now  
#16 of 21 Old 11-02-2010, 01:20 AM
 
Liquesce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Mayberry
Posts: 4,973
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't think of it as something that has been adapted into American Christianity so much as it is something that is a broader American cultural tradition ... I mean, I'm Muslim, and American, and it's as much my tradition as anybody's.

I totally understand you're going more for connections to Samhain, etc, and I think some people above have probably given good responses on that front, but just the wording of the original question ... even though a lot of people of various faiths opt out for religious reasons, I think one of the cool things about Halloween is that it really is just a non-denominational fun day that doesn't demand or necessarily imply a belief in anything, and therefore is open to anyone. I've just never seen it framed as an American Christian cultural experience before.
Liquesce is offline  
#17 of 21 Old 11-02-2010, 01:26 AM
 
kcstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: nowhere near Kansas
Posts: 756
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeepyCat View Post
I love Halloween because it's one of a very few celebrations that connect us to our neighbors.
Me too! Although, I do follow my parent's custom of saying "Happy Halloween!" instead of "Trick or Treat." Every once in a *great* while I've come to a house that insists on the other greeting/"threat", but unless pressed I stick with my own.

WombatClay is spot-on, in drawing the distinction between Halloween as a secular holiday and the religious traditions.

I have been to some BEAUTIFUL Samhain traditions before, mostly from eclectic-Wiccan traditions. I'm starting to get involved with an ADF / Heathen group, but we skipped their Samhain campout this year.

My practice is also influenced by my cradle Catholicism, and my time in Texas. Today was El Dia de los Muertos, or All Souls Day. Tomorrow is All Saints Day... and my mother's birthday.

This is the Day of the Dead following my mother's passing. I'm afraid I haven't been brave enough to either move her soul along to the next world, or to invite her home for dinner. I like the concept of honoring my ancestors, in the abstract, but the specifics are a little too close to home / toxic for me just yet.

We *have* been eating pomegranates around the house. A couple of times at meals I have told DS the story of Persephone. And Sunday at lunch we had both pomegranate and apple, opening up new ones to see what's inside. But we kept it very low-key rather than high ritual.

Unitarian Universalist Pagan
kcstar is offline  
#18 of 21 Old 11-02-2010, 05:36 AM
 
babygirlie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 876
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Halloween has nothing to do with christianity nor satanism. It is so diverse due to it being last chance harvest time! Now is the time to gather stock, finish up the last crops of the year and prepare for the upcoming winter. That's all. Probably why it is confusing because people all over the world have a last chance harvest week. It came way before religions even, especially christianity. Think more on the lines of celtic and clans and villages.

As for the constumes one guy decided that this was the weakest point of time between this world and the next. So people would put places to eat for their past loved ones. It was not mean it was welcoming. One day a year you got to feast with your family and your ancestors. What a beautiful day. then they had key villagers wear white to confuse any spirits that were not good.

No offence but christians kind of think everything is about them and if not it's against them. Nothing to do with them :P

Now as for the evil and scary parts of it? Probably has to do with money. All odd random things come from money :P Snake oil sold well.
babygirlie is offline  
#19 of 21 Old 11-02-2010, 05:37 AM
 
babygirlie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 876
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sorry but Samhain has nothing to do with wiccans or witches. It's JUST about the harvest. What ppl spin it into is whatever... but not the true meaning.
babygirlie is offline  
#20 of 21 Old 11-02-2010, 05:54 AM
 
Chamomile Girl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: West of the Sierras East of the Sea
Posts: 2,860
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by babygirlie View Post
No offence but christians kind of think everything is about them and if not it's against them. Nothing to do with them :P
Well, since Halloween was brought to this country by Catholics who had been celebrating many of its traditions for over a millenna I'd say you can't completely discount the Christian connection. Looking for the oldest echoes of modern holidays and then labeling those the only authentic ones is a-historic and a false dichotomy. Many things have pagan roots. Most of our holidays in fact. But you are being willfully blind to the richness of the traditions if you ignore how they evolved throughout the entirety of their history.

I'm not even a Christian, but I am a historian and I just freaking hate it when people try to sweep the entire Middle Ages under the rug .

I mean even the name Halloween comes from All Hallows Eve, which is the night before All Saints Day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by babygirlie View Post
Sorry but Samhain has nothing to do with wiccans or witches. It's JUST about the harvest. What ppl spin it into is whatever... but not the true meaning.
What on earth do you think Wiccans celebrate on Samhain if not the harvest?


OP I too found the way you worded your original query to be odd in that you asked about how close to the "real thing" peoples' customs are. What is the real thing to you? In today's N.America it doesn't get any more real than trick or treating; and the only reason we care so much about the past of Halloween is that the holiday is so popular today. Nobody really cares about the pagan origins of Lughnasadh for example because its not very popular (which has always been a bummer to me as it coincides with my birthday ).

I love the harvest connection to Halloween, but I love its liminal quality more...having a tradition of a night where the barrier between our world and that of the dead is thin is awesome. I love the deathiness. When I was a kid Halloween marked the transition into winter (the season of death) in a very real way because by Nov 1 mild autumn weather was almost over. Many years it snowed on Halloween, and it was always see-your-breath cold. Now that I live in California I miss this enormously. It was in the 70's here today.
Chamomile Girl is offline  
#21 of 21 Old 11-02-2010, 11:17 AM
Banned
 
Witch's Titee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeepyCat View Post
... Keeping Your Ferret From Destroying Your Yarn Stash After the Twins are Born - October!...
Witch's Titee is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off