Buddhists II - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-23-2003, 04:50 AM - Thread Starter
 
MysticHealerMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: City of Roses
Posts: 1,994
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi,

I have a lot of questions since the birth of my kiddo. It was super spiritual. Not just the birth, afterwards.

Today I met a Buddhist right when I was flailing about where to turn. I saw my naturopath this morning, she's quite spirutal, and very scientific, a very good blend for a doc. She told me that I should find a therapist who was lower down the chain, not a psychiatrist, or even a nurse practitioner. But how to go into the spirtual and Buddhist nature of my personal discovery? I don't know.

The Buddhist I met turned me on to this site: www.robertbeatty.com - he's in Portland, he's a Buddhist and he's a therapist. I almost have goosebumps. But, i'm even more convinced that there is order in teh universe and things happen for a reason.

Thao; I saw your spirtuality, religion and war thread, very thought provoking, I didn't have the energy to comment there, but I skimmed it. I have so many thoughts about war, violence and especially what's going on in the middle east right now, and some ideas are new since my strong birth experience. I wouldn't have guessed I'd have such an earth shattering, life altering introduction to being a mom, but I cherish my experience and I love my little guy.

Gotta run,

peace out

Lori
MysticHealerMom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-23-2003, 09:48 AM - Thread Starter
 
MysticHealerMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: City of Roses
Posts: 1,994
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
are we all supposed to be seeking enlightenment? or is this just something for monks? perhaps we're supposed to be preparing ourselves for enlightenment even if we aren't actively seeking it? and how come you can't achieve it in every day life? or can you? is there something about being a woman that exludes one from obtaining enlightenment? cuz I gotta say, that birthing was pretty, well, euphoric and mind altering. euphoric in the spirutal sense. seems to me that women are more closely connected to the cosmos, but i've read in several places that women are excluded from practice. as if being 'just a woman and just a mother' somehow makes you less enlighten-able? anyone else find this message? and how do you know if you've become enlightened? it just is what it is? can you understand the nature of the universe and not be enlightened? i thought that was the end result. i'm sure my understanding is over simplified and probably one sided - someone else's opinion of what it means to be a buddhist, as it were.

just curious...

Lori
MysticHealerMom is offline  
Old 04-23-2003, 04:08 PM
Administrator
 
adinal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 24,482
Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
I think that everyone should be seeking enlightenment. And those that aren't, well that is what the karmic cycle is for. YOu do it over and over again until you learn. And by learning, you come closer to enlightenment. I am unsure about the "formal" stance on women and enlightenment. But as the bringers of life, I can see why that would make it harder for women to get to that ethereal place...we are so very tied to this world, in terms of birthing and such. We are the continuers of the karmic cycle in a way. Allowing the soul to be born again into this plane. Just my thoughts...I think that women can attain it no doubt. Just pondering the overall time it would take..that of course being the wrong way to think about it. But I think that also in terms of enlightenment being the ability to be able to perceive the universe accurately, and get it...we have one up on men, in that birth can definetely open that door. Just being pg, i would imagine, having not been pg myself, would open that door a bit.

mmmm interesting things to think about.

winner.jpg Adina knit.gifmama to B hearts.gif 4/06  and E baby.gif  8/13/12 (on her due date!) homebirth.jpg waterbirth.jpg

 

adinal is offline  
Old 04-23-2003, 04:20 PM
Administrator
 
adinal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 24,482
Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Double post :

winner.jpg Adina knit.gifmama to B hearts.gif 4/06  and E baby.gif  8/13/12 (on her due date!) homebirth.jpg waterbirth.jpg

 

adinal is offline  
Old 04-25-2003, 02:29 AM - Thread Starter
 
MysticHealerMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: City of Roses
Posts: 1,994
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think you're right, Adina. Door to the cosmos, as it were. If you allow yourself to trust the experience, open yourself to whatever may come and ask for help when you need it, you'll be primed for the best experience you could hope for.

man, i totally dig buddhism

Lori
MysticHealerMom is offline  
Old 04-25-2003, 12:41 PM
 
Lindy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 486
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My thoughts, enlightenment just comes, you don't have to go seeking it out. You live your life the best you can, and then at a moment when you least expect it enlightenment is there for a while, next time a while longer. Maybe someday it comes and stays. Relax, be happy, that's my motto.
Lindy is offline  
Old 04-27-2003, 03:14 AM - Thread Starter
 
MysticHealerMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: City of Roses
Posts: 1,994
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i know i've carped about this before, but is there a concept of the femine in buddhism? sort of like the mother goddess, a pantheistic sense, or is it asexual? i get the feeling that buddhism is patriarcal in nature. is there a distinction? or is it gender neutral or something? i'm not referring to creator gods, I just mean feminine distnctly
MysticHealerMom is offline  
Old 04-29-2003, 04:13 AM
 
Thao's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Washington state
Posts: 2,094
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi Lori, I've just gotten back on the boards after a break of about a week and am reading all your threads with interest. It sounds like you are processing an awful lot right now!

In response to the question above, there are certainly female Boddhisatvas who are revered/worshipped in the Mahayana tradition. I think that the Tibetan and Zen branches of Buddhism (which are more popular here in the States) are more male dominated, but the Mahayana tradition has quite a few female Boddhisatvas. The big one in Vietnam is Phat Ba Quan The Am, I believe she is big in China too. When I was in Vietnam I saw probably as many images of her in homes and temples as I did of the Buddha. I think people gravitate towards the female, even in traditionally patriarchal religions, because of the nurturing and comfort that the female principle represents. The "Goddess" always sneaks in.
Thao is offline  
Old 04-29-2003, 04:30 AM - Thread Starter
 
MysticHealerMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: City of Roses
Posts: 1,994
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally posted by Thao
The "Goddess" always sneaks in.
it does seem that way what about Kuan? I think that's part of her name. I see statues of her all over.

Quote:
It sounds like you are processing an awful lot right now!
to be sure...
MysticHealerMom is offline  
Old 04-29-2003, 05:17 AM
 
Thao's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Washington state
Posts: 2,094
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh yeah, that's her Chinese name, I was trying to remember it. Kuan Yin = Quan Am, get it?
Thao is offline  
Old 09-01-2004, 12:24 PM
 
Girl Named Sandoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: On the road to Mandalay...
Posts: 1,541
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm a Tibetan Buddhist. I'm also a feminist .

Buddhism may appear patriarchal at first, but I think this is due to the fact that the societies that it appeared in in our age where patriarchal. The teachings themselves do not make a distinction between male and female as far as the potantial for enlightenment goes. Any anti-female bias comes from social and cultural norms of the times, and is contrary to Buddhist philosophy.

Tantric Buddhism is a wonderful form of Buddhism for women (and men) to practise IMO as it is very empowering and gives a lot of room to be individualistic, wild, crazy and break rules.

This is a good link:

http://www.loudzen.com/skydancer/biblio/

and this:

http://www.exoticindiaart.com/article/dakini

Quote:
The Tibetan word 'lama' invariably conjures up a masculine image. A detailed consideration of its etymology however, paints a different and ironical picture. The first syllable 'la' means superior, while the second 'ma' is the word for mother and as a suffix denotes the feminine nature of a word in the Tibetan language. Practitioners confirm that the 'ma' in lama refers to the mother, and that the explanation for this title is that the lama is viewed as the highest form of motherhood. In the universally acknowledged Tibetan-English dictionary by Chandra Das, the word lama is literally interpreted as 'soul mother,' or the all-sustaining mother of the universe, a Tibetan saying quoted in the same place states that "previous to the lama, even the name of the Buddha did not exist."

If anything this small detail makes us aware of the extreme significance Buddhist thought places on the feminine. This is in contrast to the popular imagination, which emphasizes the dominance of the male element, pointing as evidence to the preponderance of male icons in the Buddhist pantheon. Undoubtedly, the bulk of Buddhist art consists of typically masculine imagery, and that too of a serene and calm kind. But different from this general iconographical attribute, there exist a genre of important goddesses who display a violent dynamism rarely visible elsewhere in Buddhist aesthetics. In universal parlance they are referred to as Dakinis or Yoginis, and encompass a dazzling array of female imagery.
Girl Named Sandoz is offline  
Old 09-02-2004, 02:30 PM
 
*solsticemama*'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 1,475
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MysticHealerMom
but is there a concept of the femine in buddhism? sort of like the mother goddess, I just mean feminine distnctly
Tara is a revered female buddha. Born from the tear of Avalokiteshvara's eye, who is often described as the bodhisattva of compassion, Tara was motivated by the aspiration to awaken in female form. One of Tara's many names and forms is "Mother of the Buddhas"
*solsticemama* is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off