June 2010 Book Challenge Thread - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 86 Old 06-02-2010, 05:31 AM - Thread Starter
 
NewCrunchyDaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: The Burrow
Posts: 2,649
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Can we just all agree to make June stretch out for as long as possible? I'm not ready for the year to be June already. I'm not and no one can make me!

Okay, now that that is out of my system...

So, just by way of clarification (for comers both new and old), new and improved guidelines for the Book Challenge Thread are as follows:

1) Post the books you read ... or not
2) Post a recommendation ... or not
3) Number your book ... or not
4) Make a goal ... or not
5) Have fun with books (This one, unfortunately, is MANDATORY)



So, with that, avante, allons-y and a happy reading June to everyone!

2009's Thread can be found HERE
January's Thread can be found HERE
February's Thread can be found HERE
March's Thread can be found HERE
April's Thread can be found HERE
May's Thread can be found HERE

"A mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge." - Tyrion Lannister

NewCrunchyDaddy is offline  
#2 of 86 Old 06-02-2010, 06:54 AM
 
cathe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 5,735
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Dracula, My Love by Syrie James

This book is based on the novel Dracula told from Mina Harker's point of view. Supposedly, she didn't tell the whole truth in the original novel--she was not as repulsed by Dracula as she said she was. The writing was good but this was a bit to much of a steamy romance novel for me.

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
cathe is offline  
#3 of 86 Old 06-02-2010, 01:29 PM
 
konamama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Big Island of Hawaii
Posts: 1,330
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
back again - reading 4 books right now - need to just start finishing one at a time and get on with it already :-)
konamama is offline  
#4 of 86 Old 06-02-2010, 07:27 PM
 
fremontmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: PNW
Posts: 2,476
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
#30 No Lifeguard On Duty: The Accidental Life of the World's First Supermodel by Janice Dickinson

Janice Dickinson recounts her life, lots of crazy stories including Studio 54 in its heyday, screwing every famous person famous for screwing i.e. Mick Jagger, Jack Nicholson, Warren Beatty, etc etc. and all the gory details of 70's and 80's excess. Pure junk food reading at its best.

#31 Green For Life by Victoria Boutenko

As a palate cleanser.....Boutenko writes about life in her family as strict raw food eaters and transitioning to daily green smoothie drinkers also. She explains why she thinks it's good for us, compares the typical human diet to the typical chimpanzee diet, etc. Pretty interesting. I won't be going raw anytime soon, but I think I can do a green smoothie on a regular basis.

#32 Just Kids by Patti Smith

I really enjoyed this recounting of Smith's early life with Robert Mapplethorpe. She has a wonderfully poetic writing style and the era she describes in NYC sounds so alive. Really fun read.

#32 Between Barack and a Hard Place: Racism and White Denial in the Age of Obama by Tim Wise

Fascinating! For someone who thought they had an inkling of racism, this was eye-opening. I'd recommend it to everyone. It would be a good classroom discussion book.

#33 Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult

Having read a handful of Picoult books, by now, I feel like I've figured out her formula and I've lost interest. Good filler if I'm looking for a book to fill the gaps between books.

#34 Secret Son by Laila Lalami

I picked this up b/c it's a Seattle Public Library Seattle Reads pick. My book club also chose it. I'm looking forward to the discussion, there is a lot to analyze and delve into. The plot line was a little unexpected for me, and I enjoyed not being able to predict where the story was going.

#35 Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts

Loved it. Recommending it to everyone. A nice juicy almost 1000 page read, the kind you don't want to end. I was surprised it was an autobiography, b/c the story is so amazing, it's sort of hard to believe that someone who has been through all of that is also such a wonderful writer. The author escapes prison in Australia and ends up in India. He lives an interesting life there, living in the slums, hooking up with the mafia, etc. It was a wild ride. I heard the movie rights have been sold to Johnny Depp, I'm not sure a movie will be able to do the story justice.
fremontmama is offline  
#5 of 86 Old 06-02-2010, 08:03 PM
 
*bejeweled*'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Texas
Posts: 4,372
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The Garden of Eden by Hemingway

This is one of my all time favorite books about an American couple in Europe on a long honeymoon. I'm currently rereading it.

Me afro.jpg reading.gif Wife and Mom to modifiedartist.gif cat.gifdog2.gif.
*bejeweled* is offline  
#6 of 86 Old 06-02-2010, 10:38 PM
 
Teensy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 1,737
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn

I finished this book yesterday and can't stop thinking about it. The chapters address different issues such as the sex trade and FGM, but the chapter on maternal mortality has really gotten me thinking and wanting to help make sure women around the world receive the medical care and support they need.

The book is definitely a reminder of how fortunate I am to have the resources I do (even something as simple as ionized salt, which I can't say I've spend much time thinking about).

Highly recommend this book to anyone who would like to make a positive change for women (and men!) around the world.

Tanya
Mom to John (age 11), James (age 9) & Katherine (age 5)
Teensy is offline  
#7 of 86 Old 06-02-2010, 11:33 PM
 
kangamitroo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: city girl reading on a farm in PA
Posts: 1,387
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
in the May thread Bufomander had posted: "#93 An Abundance of Katherines by John Green. This one was fun. YA. I'm enough of a goof that I like footnotes in fiction books."
& i had to say, me too about the being a goof & enjoying the footnotes. i'll have to check this one out.

read Girl in Translation by Jean Kwok. i almost did not finish because it was wearing me out: the poor girl working with her mom in a sweatshop, living in a cruddy apartment, in debt to greedy family, feeling trapped, no social life. on the other hand, i'm so glad she wrote this book, because there are people living like this and maybe some sympathy/change could be incited?

mama to one amazing daughter born 1/2004
kangamitroo is offline  
#8 of 86 Old 06-04-2010, 06:47 AM
 
cathe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 5,735
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ice Queen by Alice Hoffman

I realized about halfway through that I'd read this before but I enjoyed it the second time as well. This is about a women unable to get close to anyone. She gets struck by lightning and has a relationship with another lightning strike survivor. Very good book.

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
cathe is offline  
#9 of 86 Old 06-05-2010, 03:35 PM
 
Bufomander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
#95

I wasn't sure what I would think about Take Good Care of the Garden and the Dogs: Family, Friendships, and Faith in Small-Town Alaska (by Heather Lende). I believe I checked it out after it was recommended in a newsletter from our local bookstore. I definitely enjoyed it and I'm glad I chose it to start the challenge. It was good enough stuff that I want to share a few excerpts and ideas verbatim.

Quote:
It is often said that there are no atheists in foxholes. It seems to me that shelled bunkers would be full of skeptics. In the middle of a war it must be harder, not easier, to believe in a good God. If it were up to me, I'd change that line to there are no atheists in delivery rooms or adoption agencies, but maybe that's because I have given birth to four children and have adopted one. (p.5)
Lende was run over by a truck while biking in April 2005. I didn't know this about her when I picked up this book. A year ago, I was hit by a car while crossing the street and, while my injuries were nothing compared to Lende's, there was much with which I could identify. As I am approaching the one-year mark (June 23) it was a good time for me to be reading this book.

Quote:
I . . . realized that most of us have been hit by a proverbial truck at least once and that, as broadsides go, mine may have been one of the easier to recover from because it was so literal and so public, compared to breast cancer or a messy divorce. (p.8)
Speaking of grocery lists her mother left before her death:

Quote:
Maybe it is wishful thinking, or maybe I didn't have enough for lunch and am light-headed, but what I hear her notes, and thus her, is this: eat dessert, be sure there's coffee for the morning, write things down so you don't forget them, and don't waste paper . . . a person could do worse than to live by those words . . . (p 101-102)
The back cover describes Lende's writing as "part Annie Dillard, part Anne Lamott". The comparison resonates with me, at least the Anne Lamott part -- Reading what Lende has to say about faith makes me want to do an about-face and embrace Christianity once more. She makes me proud of my (fellow?) Christians.

Quote:
Maybe what humans lack in understanding we make up for with faith. I do know deep down that there is something good about this world -- and that something is love. You don't have to be a Christian to know that's why we keep picking each other up every time we fall down. You just have to be human. I hope that someday I'll really love my neighbors, especially the difficult ones . . . In the meantime, I'll keep going to my church, because I know what our vicar, Jan would say about this. It's the same message she preached on "Love Your Neighbor Sunday," and the same one she reiterates in one form or another every Sunday. We are called by Jesus to be good to all people, even those we don't think we like, much less love . . . This, and only this, will ever shake up the world enough to change it." (p. 160-161)
As I've been recovering from my accident, I've been very conscious of not referring to my injured arm, shoulder, and neck as my "bad arm" etc., but rather as my injured arm, my healing neck, my tender shoulder, etc. It was validating to hear Lende's physical therapist reiterate this idea.
Quote:
Quote:
"She . . . wouldn't let me call it my 'bad leg.' She said if I started doing that, it would never heal."
All in all, just some good stuff about community, about faith, about healing, about small town life, about life in Alaska.
Bufomander is offline  
#10 of 86 Old 06-05-2010, 07:15 PM
 
Bufomander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
#96 I Am the Messenger by Markus Zusak
Bufomander is offline  
#11 of 86 Old 06-06-2010, 04:40 AM
 
TEAK's Mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Juneau, AK
Posts: 2,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
#95

I wasn't sure what I would think about Take Good Care of the Garden and the Dogs: Family, Friendships, and Faith in Small-Town Alaska (by Heather Lende). I believe I checked it out after it was recommended in a newsletter from our local bookstore. I definitely enjoyed it and I'm glad I chose it to start the challenge. It was good enough stuff that I want to share a few excerpts and ideas verbatim.
Heather really is that cool. Have you read her other book, If You Lived Here, I'd Know Your Name?
TEAK's Mom is offline  
#12 of 86 Old 06-06-2010, 08:48 AM
 
Bufomander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
#97 Double Identity by Margaret Peterson Haddix
MPH never disappoints.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TEAK's Mom View Post
Heather really is that cool. Have you read her other book, If You Lived Here, I'd Know Your Name?
No, but after this I definitely want to. And I love it that you are on a first name basis with her!
Bufomander is offline  
#13 of 86 Old 06-06-2010, 05:36 PM
 
TEAK's Mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Juneau, AK
Posts: 2,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The entire state of Alaska is a very small town.
TEAK's Mom is offline  
#14 of 86 Old 06-06-2010, 06:03 PM
 
Bufomander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
#98 The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
a re-read, but on audio-book this time.
Bufomander is offline  
#15 of 86 Old 06-06-2010, 06:04 PM
 
Bufomander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEAK's Mom View Post
The entire state of Alaska is a very small town.
Awesome. I have a friend who spent all the summers of her childhood near Larsen Bay (on Bear Island).
Bufomander is offline  
#16 of 86 Old 06-06-2010, 06:33 PM
 
mammastar2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 2,754
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
#98 The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
a re-read, but on audio-book this time.
I read that for the first time last year and loved it!

#30 - The Private Patient by P.D. James

This is a very recent Adam Dalgliesh novel by James. I enjoyed it, ish. It took far too long to get going, and felt rather affected, I thought.
mammastar2 is offline  
#17 of 86 Old 06-06-2010, 07:31 PM
 
Bufomander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammastar2 View Post
I read that for the first time last year and loved it!

#30 - The Private Patient by P.D. James

This is a very recent Adam Dalgliesh novel by James. I enjoyed it, ish. It took far too long to get going, and felt rather affected, I thought.
That one was on my Amazon recs, which is why I started reading the series -- still working my way toward this one-- a good reminder that I need to figure out where I'm at in the series.
Bufomander is offline  
#18 of 86 Old 06-06-2010, 07:48 PM
 
nancy926's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: where we always need more bookcases
Posts: 2,472
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hunger, by Michael Grant - This is the sequel to Gone, set in a California town in which everyone over the age of 14 disappears one afternoon. In the sequel, food is scarce, and there's something evil underground trying to come alive. Many kids have powers of some kind - one can move faster than the eye can see, one can suspend gravity, etc. - and so there's also a divide between the "normals" and the "freaks."

I thought this was okay - about 100 pages too long, though. And while the characters are strongly written so that it's very possible to tell all 15 or so main characters apart, I started to wonder what they were thinking (beyond the 2 or 3 that Grant most focuses on) - you don't get inside their heads much. I also began to wonder if he were writing in hopes of having a movie made from his books... they would almost be better as movies. (I'm not sure if that's a compliment or not!)

A writer/runner/thinker/wife with two daughters (11/02 and 8/05), one dog, three cats, seven fish, and a partridge in a pear tree... in Vermont.
nancy926 is offline  
#19 of 86 Old 06-07-2010, 07:56 PM
 
grapejuicemama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Podunkville
Posts: 920
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
#35 Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts

Loved it. Recommending it to everyone. A nice juicy almost 1000 page read, the kind you don't want to end. I was surprised it was an autobiography, b/c the story is so amazing, it's sort of hard to believe that someone who has been through all of that is also such a wonderful writer. The author escapes prison in Australia and ends up in India. He lives an interesting life there, living in the slums, hooking up with the mafia, etc. It was a wild ride. I heard the movie rights have been sold to Johnny Depp, I'm not sure a movie will be able to do the story justice.[/QUOTE]

So glad you read this! I read it a few years ago and recommended it to everyone I came across, but didn't have many takers. It's an excellent book~one I'm thinking about reading again once I'm over the fluff phase I'm in right now.

I think it's been stop and go for the movie production. We'll see what happens, but there's a LOT of story to cram into a two hour movie.
grapejuicemama is offline  
#20 of 86 Old 06-07-2010, 09:39 PM
 
cathe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 5,735
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sounds like a good book for summer. I will see if my library has it.

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
cathe is offline  
#21 of 86 Old 06-08-2010, 02:33 AM
 
Bufomander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
#99 Num8ers by Rachel Ward
Boy, some of the reviews of this on Amazon were pretty tough -- I liked it -- and wept at the end -- which may or may not say more about my emotional state than the strength of the writing. Have others here read it?
Bufomander is offline  
#22 of 86 Old 06-08-2010, 10:09 AM
 
nancy926's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: where we always need more bookcases
Posts: 2,472
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, by Rebecca Skloot -- From Goodreads: "Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years.... HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the atom bomb’s effects; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions.

Yet Henrietta Lacks remains virtually unknown, buried in an unmarked grave."

I've known about HeLa cells for almost 20 years, but never really considered the details. This is an original piece of science writing in that Skloot inserts herself directly into the narrative; she brings you with her through her journey to find Lacks' family and convince them to talk to her. At first this was off-putting, but I kept reading, and in the end I appreciated the full disclosure. The science segments are well done and easy to understand (I think... I'm a science nerd, so perhaps I'm not the best judge!), but the chapters about Henrietta herself, and her family, are the real story.

A writer/runner/thinker/wife with two daughters (11/02 and 8/05), one dog, three cats, seven fish, and a partridge in a pear tree... in Vermont.
nancy926 is offline  
#23 of 86 Old 06-08-2010, 10:12 AM
 
Bufomander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by nancy926 View Post
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, by Rebecca Skloot -- From Goodreads: "Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years.... HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the atom bomb’s effects; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions.

Yet Henrietta Lacks remains virtually unknown, buried in an unmarked grave."

I've known about HeLa cells for almost 20 years, but never really considered the details. This is an original piece of science writing in that Skloot inserts herself directly into the narrative; she brings you with her through her journey to find Lacks' family and convince them to talk to her. At first this was off-putting, but I kept reading, and in the end I appreciated the full disclosure. The science segments are well done and easy to understand (I think... I'm a science nerd, so perhaps I'm not the best judge!), but the chapters about Henrietta herself, and her family, are the real story.
This is my #100 and I am definitely enjoying it! As a mostly non-science nerd, I agree that she writes well for laypeople -- though I'm also willing to admit that there may be some details that are just going over my head.
Bufomander is offline  
#24 of 86 Old 06-08-2010, 02:13 PM
 
fremontmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: PNW
Posts: 2,476
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by grapejuicemama View Post
#35 Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts

Loved it. Recommending it to everyone. A nice juicy almost 1000 page read, the kind you don't want to end. I was surprised it was an autobiography, b/c the story is so amazing, it's sort of hard to believe that someone who has been through all of that is also such a wonderful writer. The author escapes prison in Australia and ends up in India. He lives an interesting life there, living in the slums, hooking up with the mafia, etc. It was a wild ride. I heard the movie rights have been sold to Johnny Depp, I'm not sure a movie will be able to do the story justice.
So glad you read this! I read it a few years ago and recommended it to everyone I came across, but didn't have many takers. It's an excellent book~one I'm thinking about reading again once I'm over the fluff phase I'm in right now.

I think it's been stop and go for the movie production. We'll see what happens, but there's a LOT of story to cram into a two hour movie.[/QUOTE]

Yes, definitely a lot to cram into a two hour movie. I'm not sure it's possible It'd be interesting though. Maybe they could do it in two parts or something..... Have you checked out the author's website? I wanted to find out what had happened to him after the book, so googled him.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
#95

I wasn't sure what I would think about Take Good Care of the Garden and the Dogs: Family, Friendships, and Faith in Small-Town Alaska (by Heather Lende). I believe I checked it out after it was recommended in a newsletter from our local bookstore. I definitely enjoyed it and I'm glad I chose it to start the challenge. It was good enough stuff that I want to share a few excerpts and ideas verbatim.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
#99 Num8ers by Rachel Ward
Boy, some of the reviews of this on Amazon were pretty tough -- I liked it -- and wept at the end -- which may or may not say more about my emotional state than the strength of the writing. Have others here read it?
Oh, those both sound like fun! I like those quotes from the Alaska book.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nancy926 View Post
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, by Rebecca Skloot -- From Goodreads: "Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years.... HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the atom bomb’s effects; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions.

Yet Henrietta Lacks remains virtually unknown, buried in an unmarked grave."

I've known about HeLa cells for almost 20 years, but never really considered the details. This is an original piece of science writing in that Skloot inserts herself directly into the narrative; she brings you with her through her journey to find Lacks' family and convince them to talk to her. At first this was off-putting, but I kept reading, and in the end I appreciated the full disclosure. The science segments are well done and easy to understand (I think... I'm a science nerd, so perhaps I'm not the best judge!), but the chapters about Henrietta herself, and her family, are the real story.
I'm definitely reading this one at some point. It's on my list!


I'm reading a few books right now. Nurture Shock by Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman, Anne Lamott's new book Imperfect Birds, both really good. I'm trying to power through Girls Like Us about Carole King, Joni Mitchell and Carly Simon, not sure I'm enjoying it though.....

I've made the goal to read all the books I had around my dresser before getting a bunch more from the library. Not doing too bad either! I have about 40-50 books that were stacked up on top of and under my dresser I cleaned them all off and stacked them in the closet to be accessed one by one, instead of cluttering up my room I'm trying really hard not to request new books, but having a hard time!
fremontmama is offline  
#25 of 86 Old 06-08-2010, 10:31 PM
 
Bufomander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post
I'm reading a few books right now. Nurture Shock by Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman, Anne Lamott's new book Imperfect Birds, both really good. I'm trying to power through Girls Like Us about Carole King, Joni Mitchell and Carly Simon, not sure I'm enjoying it though.....

I've made the goal to read all the books I had around my dresser before getting a bunch more from the library. Not doing too bad either! I have about 40-50 books that were stacked up on top of and under my dresser I cleaned them all off and stacked them in the closet to be accessed one by one, instead of cluttering up my room I'm trying really hard not to request new books, but having a hard time!
Is the new Lamott fiction? I've found that I like her non-fiction way more than her fiction.

I love that, in this group, there are at least a few of us who find nothing odd in your last paragraph.
Bufomander is offline  
#26 of 86 Old 06-09-2010, 01:42 PM
 
fremontmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: PNW
Posts: 2,476
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
Is the new Lamott fiction? I've found that I like her non-fiction way more than her fiction.

I love that, in this group, there are at least a few of us who find nothing odd in your last paragraph.
It is fiction. Imperfect Birds is a continuation of the story in Crooked Little Heart and Rosie. It's about when the little girl Rosie is a teenager, the summer before her senior year in high school. I actually like Lamott's fiction, but it feels almost like non-fiction, some of it seems so autobiographical....is that a word?

And yes, if there is any group of people to whom (who?) I could admit that I have 40 or 50 books stacked up in my bedroom, I figure this is it
fremontmama is offline  
#27 of 86 Old 06-09-2010, 06:35 PM
 
kangamitroo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: city girl reading on a farm in PA
Posts: 1,387
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i have fallen really hard for Jacqueline Woodson. when i get to hear her read one day, my palms will feel clammy and my heart will start to race, i will stutter and blush. i am completely crushed out. her writing makes me feel i could fly, it has so much heart.

on that note, i definitely recommend After Tupac and D Foster.

she is making me dream about having a class of students who love her, too. (N.B. if you are one who prays, add me to your list. oh, how i want a 6th grade class!)

mama to one amazing daughter born 1/2004
kangamitroo is offline  
#28 of 86 Old 06-09-2010, 07:44 PM
 
cathe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 5,735
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bufomander View Post
is the new lamott fiction? I've found that i like her non-fiction way more than her fiction.
ita

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
cathe is offline  
#29 of 86 Old 06-10-2010, 01:20 AM
 
kaliki_kila's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: East Bay, California
Posts: 735
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
37. The Brief History of the Dead by Kevin Brockmeier
38. Real Food by Nina Planck

The first one I really enjoyed and the second one was probably the most informative "what to eat" book I've ever read. I liked it better even than In Defense of Food.
kaliki_kila is offline  
#30 of 86 Old 06-10-2010, 10:10 AM
 
cathe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 5,735
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Cutting for Stone by Abraham Erghese

I enjoyed this novel about twin boys born to an Indian nun in Ethopia. The father, a British surgeon, devasted when the mother dies in childbirth, flees the scene and the boys are brought up by other doctors in in the the hospital. I love the blend of learning more about the history, life, and revolution in Ethopia and medical issues they are facing. Very well done book.

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
cathe is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off