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Old 04-02-2011, 06:19 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Just by way of clarification (for comers both new and old), new and improved guidelines for the Book Challenge Thread are as follows: 1) Post the books you read ... or not 2) Post a recommendation ... or not 3) Number your book ... or not 4) Make a goal for how many books you want to read in 2011 ... or not 5) Have fun with books (This one, unfortunately, is MANDATORY) Happy reading everyone!


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Old 04-02-2011, 06:21 PM - Thread Starter
 
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The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party by Alexander McCall Smith

 

The newest installment in the No. 1 Ladies Dectective Club Series . . . . pretty much the usual--enjoyable enough.


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Old 04-03-2011, 08:48 AM - Thread Starter
 
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What Every Girl Except Me Knows by Nora Leigh Baskin

 

This was a great coming-of-age book about 12-year-old Gabby who has grown up without a mother and desperately wants one so she can know what all the other girls at school know. She seems to always say, do, and wear the wrong thing. This is a great story of friendship and growing up. Highly recommended for 5th grade and up,


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Old 04-03-2011, 11:14 AM
 
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Dreaming in Cuban by Cristina Garcia

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/g/cristina-garcia/dreaming-in-cuban.htm

What a delight to not only find an author who I have never read before, but also discover that she has many more books for me to read! I can’t believe I  never read her works before! I feel like I uncovered a treasure chest! A rich lush story that was so captivating that once I finished it, I immediately reread it. And the best part, I read it while on vacation in Cuba.

The story follows the lives of 4 women; the grandmother who still lives in Cuba and believes in the revolution, her 2 daughters, one who stays in Cuba and involved in the Santera religion, the other who moved to New York, as well as her granddaughter who is a rebellious teenager into abstract painting and punk rock.

Although I enjoy many genre of literature, and the past 2 years I’ve discovered contemporary fantasy, Magical Realism is still and will always be my favourite.

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Old 04-03-2011, 03:35 PM
 
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Fablehaven, Mull

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For centuries mystical creatures of all description were gathered into a hidden refuge called Fablehaven to prevent their extinction. The sanctuary survives today as one of the last strongholds of true magic. Enchanting? Absolutely. Exciting? You bet. Safe? Well, actually, quite the opposite.

Kendra and her brother, Seth, have no idea that their grandfather is the current caretaker of Fablehaven. Inside the gated woods, ancient laws keep relative order among greedy trolls, mischievous satyrs, plotting witches, spiteful imps, and jealous fairies. However, when the rules get broken -- Seth is a bit too curious and reckless for his own good -- powerful forces of evil are unleashed, and Kendra and her brother face the greatest challenge of their lives. To save their family, Fablehaven, and perhaps even the world, Kendra and Seth must find the courage to do what they fear most.

 

Great first book in the series!

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Old 04-04-2011, 11:14 AM
 
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Holy Mackerel!  April!!!!!!  I can't believe it's April already. 

 

I have a bunch of books to post, but super busy at the office today.  I'll come back soon :D

 

 

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Old 04-05-2011, 07:56 PM
 
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Originally Posted by jalilah View Post

 

Dreaming in Cuban by Cristina Garcia

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/g/cristina-garcia/dreaming-in-cuban.htm

What a delight to not only find an author who I have never read before, but also discover that she has many more books for me to read! I can’t believe I  never read her works before! I feel like I uncovered a treasure chest! A rich lush story that was so captivating that once I finished it, I immediately reread it. And the best part, I read it while on vacation in Cuba.


i'm glad you found this one—definitely a favorite of mine.  i really enjoy stories of immigrants (or the children of immigrants), living with one foot in one home/culture and the other foot in another place.  & i'm envious of your travel to Cuba!  i hope it was enjoyable.

 


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Old 04-06-2011, 04:49 PM
 
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January

1. Only Son - Kevin O'Brien

2. Planning To Live - Heather Wardell

3. The 7 Wonders That Will Change Your Life - Glenn Beck/ Keith Ablow

4. Life, Love and a Polar Bear Tatoo - Heather Wardell

5. Carved In Bone - Jefferson Bass

February

6. Thirteen Reasons Why- Jay Asher 

7. The Abstinence Teacher- Tom Perrotta

8. One Fine Day Your're Gonna Die- Gail Bowen  (90 pgs)

9. Term Limits - Vince Flynn

10. Scars - Cheryl Rainfield 

March

11. After- Amy Efaw

12. Hold Still- Nina LaCour

13. Pretty Little Things-Jilliane Hoffman 

14. Happen Every Day- Isabel Gilles

15. School Days- Robert B. Parker 

April

16.

 

Just posting so I dont get lost.

Reading about 5 books now... hope I finish them sometimg. AND the 'sisterhood of the traveling pants' 3 set was $1 at the library today. Books look brand new. spines aren't even cracked.  Just add those to me 'to be read' pile  LOL


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Old 04-08-2011, 05:20 PM
 
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Horns, Hill

 

 

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 a dark, funny exploration of love, grief, and the nature of good and evil. Ignatius William Perrish wakes up bleary and confused after a night of drinking and "doing terrible things" to find he has grown horns. In addition to being horribly unsightly, these inflamed protuberances give Ig an equally ugly power--if he thinks hard enough, he can make people admit things (intimate, embarrassing, I-can't-believe-you-just-said-that details). This bizarre affliction is of particular use to Ig, who is still grieving over the murder of his childhood sweetheart (a grisly act the entire town, including his family, believes he committed). Horns is a wickedly fun read, and reveals Hill's uncanny knack for creating alluring characters and a riveting plot. Ig's attempts to track down the killer result in hilariously inappropriate admissions from the community, heartbreaking confessions from his own family, and of course, one hell of a showdown.

 

 

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Old 04-09-2011, 12:15 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Purple Daze by Sherry Shahan

 

YA novel written in verse about a group of teens in the year 1965. It's a mixture of history and novel; letters and journal entries, etc. Especially memorable for me were the letters from Phil who is in Vietnam (in the war)--which was based on actual letters from a friend of the author from when he was in Vietnam. Great read for both teens and adults--would be nicely paired with the book Countdown.

 

 


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Old 04-09-2011, 02:52 PM
 
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The Aguero Sisters by Cristina Garcia

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/g/cristina-garcia/aguero-sisters.htm

Like her first novel Dreaming in Cuban, the Aguero Sisters also follows the lives of various Cubans; 2 sisters, one living in New York and Miami the other who is still in Cuba and their father, a scientist pre-revolution Cuba. I liked it slightly less than Dreaming in Cuba just because I did not love the characters  as much, but I still would highly recommend it.

 

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Old 04-10-2011, 10:49 AM - Thread Starter
 
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The Night Season by Chelsea Cain

 

Another well-written thriller featuring Detective Archie Sheridan. This one was way less gory than the others--more of a mystery book--which was actually kind of nice. 


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Old 04-10-2011, 03:05 PM
 
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Thanks Cathe, for starting all the monthly threads love.gif

 

Have a big ol' list of books to post, can't remember what number any of these are though.  Oh well peace.gif

 

 

#13 Viral Loop: From Facebook to Twitter, by Adam Penenberg

Reading for work.  Pretty interesting, just covers how and why certain things spread virally, like jokes, businesses, technology, websites, etc. 

 

#14 Facebook Marketing: An Hour a Day by Chris Treadaway

Also for work, has some good info in it.

 

#15 Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Reading with my daughter.  I figure if it's over 150pgs, I can count it.  This one took over a month of sporadic bedtime reading sessions.  A lovable classic.

 

#16 Untechnical Writing by Michael Bremer

Also for work, good basic info on technical writing.

 

#17 Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay

Very good book that covers a tragic subject from a present day fictionalized account and also a historical character's perspective.  It's about a roundup of Jewish families that lived in Paris and were rounded up by the French Police, ordered to by the Nazis, and sent to a local stadium before shipped off to concentration camps.  Lots of tears, but very compelling story.

 

#18 Facebook Marketing for Dummies by Paul Dunay

Also for work, good info.

 

#19 The Social Media Marketing Book by Dan Zarella

For work, good resource.

 

#20 Bel Canto by Ann Patchett

Um, liked this book until the end, then I was angry at the author.  I won't go into why in case you are going to read it.  It's about a hostage situation in South America with lots of different International diplomats and an opera singer being held hostage by local guerrilla fighters at the local Vice President's palatial home.  The hostage situation drags on for months.....

 

 

Just started The Beekeeper's Apprentice and I really like it.  Also trying to finish up another 3 social media books for work.  They're all due back at the library Monday and Tuesday, so I better get on the stick!

 

Hope y'all had an awesome weekend!

 

 

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Old 04-11-2011, 01:18 PM
 
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maybe for me Russian novels belong in the winter?  i just can't get into The Brothers Karamazov.  wanted to but.... nope.

 

off to scour my lists and make library requests.  something uplifting, maybe even funny, definitely not fluffy.... we'll see.

 

living vicariously, i'd love any travel memoir/living abroad/pilgrimage suggestions.

 

happy reading everyone.


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Old 04-11-2011, 08:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post

Thanks Cathe, for starting all the monthly threads love.gif


 

 

Just started The Beekeeper's Apprentice and I really like it.  Also trying to finish up another 3 social media books for work.  They're all due back at the library Monday and Tuesday, so I better get on the stick!

 

Hope y'all had an awesome weekend!

 

 

Beekeeper's Assistant is Mary Russell, yes?  The first one?  I like them a lot.


 

47. The Hollow Bettle  by Susannah Appelbaum
48. Left Neglected by Lisa Genova

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Old 04-12-2011, 12:18 PM
 
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Beekeeper's Assistant is Mary Russell, yes?  The first one?  I like them a lot.


 

47. The Hollow Bettle  by Susannah Appelbaum
48. Left Neglected by Lisa Genova


That's right :)  I can't wait to read more of them.  I'm really enjoying it.  Do you know how many there are?

 

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Old 04-12-2011, 03:10 PM
 
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Fast Food Nation

 

 

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history of the development of American fast food indicts the industry for some shocking crimes against humanity, including systematically destroying the American diet and landscape, and undermining our values and our economy. The first part of the book details the postwar ascendance of fast food from Southern California, assessing the impact on people in the West in general. The second half looks at the product itself: where it is manufactured (in a handful of enormous factories), what goes into it (chemicals, feces) and who is responsible (monopolistic corporate executives). In harrowing detail, the book explains the process of beef slaughter and confirms almost every urban myth about what in fact "lurks between those sesame seed buns." Given the estimate that the typical American eats three hamburgers and four orders of french fries each week, and one in eight will work for McDonald's in the course of their lives, few are exempt from the insidious impact of fast food. Throughout, Schlosser fires these and a dozen other hair-raising statistical bullets into the heart of the matter.

 

 

I really, truly think that there's something wrong with me for wanting a burger while reading this book.  Seriously, I'm an out-of-sight person, and this put it all right out there.  Sigh.

 

Square Foot Gardening

 

 

Quote:
When he created the "square foot gardening" method, Mel Bartholomew, a retired engineer and efficiency expert, found the solution to the frustrations of most gardeners. His revolutionary system is simple: it's an ingenious planting method based on using square foot blocks of garden space instead of rows. Gardeners build up, not down, so there's no digging and no tilling after the first year. And the method requires less thinning, less weeding, and less watering.

 

 

Hoping to start my first veggie garden this year, got a bunch of ideas for getting started.

 

 

 

 

 

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Old 04-12-2011, 06:51 PM
 
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January

1. Only Son - Kevin O'Brien

2. Planning To Live - Heather Wardell

3. The 7 Wonders That Will Change Your Life - Glenn Beck/ Keith Ablow

4. Life, Love and a Polar Bear Tatoo - Heather Wardell

5. Carved In Bone - Jefferson Bass

February

6. Thirteen Reasons Why- Jay Asher 

7. The Abstinence Teacher- Tom Perrotta

8. One Fine Day Your're Gonna Die- Gail Bowen  (90 pgs)

9. Term Limits - Vince Flynn

10. Scars - Cheryl Rainfield 

March

11. After- Amy Efaw

12. Hold Still- Nina LaCour

13. Pretty Little Things-Jilliane Hoffman 

14. Happen Every Day- Isabel Gilles

15. School Days- Robert B. Parker 

April 

16. I Am Emotional Creature: The Secret Life of Girls Around the World  - Eve Ensler

17. Plea of Insanity- Jilliane Hoffman

18. Unsweetined- Jodie Sweetin

 

 


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Old 04-13-2011, 08:36 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My Stroke of Insight by Jill Bolte Taylor, Ph.D.

 

An account of a brain scientist who experiences and recovers from a stroke and how it changed her way of thinking about the brain. Somewhat interesting . . .


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Old 04-16-2011, 02:39 PM
 
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Monkey Hunting by Cristina Garcia

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/g/cristina-garcia/monkey-hunting.htm

Having really loved Garcia’s Dreaming in Cuban, and also enjoyed the Aguero Sisters, I looked forward to this novel. Unfortunately I liked it a lot less. It is interesting. I did not know that many Chinese were brought to Cuba in the 1800s to work in the sugar plantations. This book follows a family from that time period until the 1970s. Because Garcia goes over such a long time period, you  feel like she is skimming over everything quickly, and you never really get to know any of the characters really well.  If you have never read Cristina Garcia’s works before, I would not suggest starting with this book. Dreaming in Cuban is still the best for me, although I have not read her other novels yet.

 

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Old 04-17-2011, 09:08 AM
 
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Cathe, This book was recommended to me. It supposed to be really amazing. These days with my busy life, I read for pleasure, In-between driving my son around to his activities or right before I go to bed, so I thought it  might be too heavy.

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My Stroke of Insight by Jill Bolte Taylor, Ph.D.

 

An account of a brain scientist who experiences and recovers from a stroke and how it changed her way of thinking about the brain. Somewhat interesting . . .



 

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Old 04-17-2011, 10:43 AM
 
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I am the Messenger, Zuzak

 

 

 

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Nineteen-year-old cabbie Ed Kennedy has little in life to be proud of: his dad died of alcoholism, and he and his mom have few prospects for success. He has little to do except share a run-down apartment with his faithful yet smelly dog, drive his taxi, and play cards and drink with his amiable yet similarly washed-up friends. Then, after he stops a bank robbery, Ed begins receiving anonymous messages marked in code on playing cards in the mail, and almost immediately his life begins to swerve off its beaten-down path. Usually the messages instruct him to be at a certain address at a certain time. So with nothing to lose, Ed embarks on a series of missions as random as a toss of dice: sometimes daredevil, sometimes heartwarmingly safe. He rescues a woman from nightly rape by her husband. He brings a congregation to an abandoned parish. The ease with which he achieves results vacillates between facile and dangerous, and Ed's search for meaning drives him to complete every task. But the true driving force behind the novel itself is readers' knowledge that behind every turn looms the unknown presence - either good or evil - of the person or persons sending the messages.

 

 

I really liked this one -- I don't think I've come across a book recently that had me tearing up in so many random pages.  The ending is odd -- but overall I do highly recommend.

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Old 04-17-2011, 11:05 AM - Thread Starter
 
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It's actually not that heavy - - - the first part about the brain is a little dry but all in all, its a pretty quick easy read. I didn't find it as amazing as the person who recommended it to me but it was interesting.

 

Originally Posted by jalilah View Post
 

   

Cathe, This book was recommended to me. It supposed to be really amazing. These days with my busy life, I read for pleasure, In-between driving my son around to his activities or right before I go to bed, so I thought it  might be too heavy.

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Old 04-19-2011, 09:49 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Great House by Nicole Krauss

 

I loved this author's first book History of Love so was excited when I spotted this at the library. This was beautifully written but not really a page turner--more of a slow, thoughtful book.


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Old 04-21-2011, 08:47 AM
 
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Arcadia Falls, Goodman

 

 

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 Following the death of her husband, Meg Rosenthal accepts a job teaching at an upstate New York boarding school and moves there with her teenage daughter, Sally. The school, Arcadia Falls, also happens to be central to her thesis, which focuses on the two female coauthors of fairy tales: Vera Beecher, who founded the school, and her friend Lily Eberhardt, who died mysteriously in 1947. While the campus is bucolic, school life proves anything but—Meg thinks she sees ghosts and Arcadia's brightest and most ambitious student, Isabel Cheney, is found dead in a ravine. Feeling Sally drifting further from her each day, Meg finds refuge in Lily's preserved diary and begins to unravel the secrets behind Isabel's death. Goodman doesn't do anything new, but her storytelling is as solid as ever, and the book is reliably entertaining.

 

Setting wise, this book is magnificent -- you truly feel transported to a crumbling boarding school, as fall descends on upstate new york.  Plot-wise, it's interseting enough, but similar to some of Goodman's other books, and with one-too-many plot twists. 

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Old 04-22-2011, 03:08 PM
 
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Getting behind on my reading as we have a new pup! I forgot how much work they can be!

 

1) A Falcon for a Queen, Catherine Gaskin
2) Peace Like a River Leif Engel
3) Life of Pi by Yann Martel
4) The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, Carson McCullers
5) Little Bee Chris Cleave
6) The Lost Gate, Orson Scott Card
7) Gail Carriger does some great steam punk, "Blameless" was recent read
8) In the Bleak Midwinter, Julia Spencer-Fleming
9) Guardian Of The Darkness (Moribito) by Nahoko Uehashi with the kids
10) The Zoo Keeper's Wife, Diane Ackerman. 
11) The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin
12) Quest For The Spark Tom Sniegoski  graphic novels.with the kids.
13) Love in the Time of Cholera’ by Gabriel Garcia Marquez-

 

14) The Return of Merlin (1995A novel by Deepak Chopra. I did enjoy this as I am quite a fan of the Arthurian legend. An interesting twist on the story.

 

When two young constables, Arthur Callum and Katy Kilbride, discover a body in a roadside ditch outside a small industrial town in Somerset, England, they set off a series of disturbing phenomena that grow to plague the entire countryside. After the body disappears and other people are reported missing, Arthur and Katy's inquiries lead them to a strange, mazelike grove and a stone that opens a doorway to the past, tearing open the fabric of time. Along with Tommy and Sis, two brave schoolboys from St. Justin's; Sir Derek Rees, a renowned scholar of Arthurian lore; and a group of town misfits, Arthur and Katy find themselves embroiled in a deadly wizard's game that began twelve centuries earlier. For the fall of Camelot was not the end of a legend: In his wisdom, Merlin had anticipated the murder of King Arthur and his knights at the hands of Mordred, the royal bastard. Like evil seeds, Mordred lay down spells that remained dormant until now, the brink of the third millennium. By using powers that transcend time, Mordred can reach into the present. Soon the forces marshaled by these two wizards will clash again and the outcome will transform all of humanity.When two young constables, Arthur Callum and Katy Kilbride, discover a body in a roadside ditch outside a small industrial town in Somerset, England, they set off a series of disturbing phenomena that grow to plague the entire countryside. After the body disappears and other people are reported missing, Arthur and Katy's inquiries lead them to a strange, mazelike grove and a stone that opens a doorway to the past, tearing open the fabric of time. Along with Tommy and Sis, two brave schoolboys from St. Justin's; Sir Derek Rees, a renowned scholar of Arthurian lore; and a group of town misfits, Arthur and Katy find themselves embroiled in a deadly wizard's game that began twelve centuries earlier. For the fall of Camelot was not the end of a legend: In his wisdom, Merlin had anticipated the murder of King Arthur and his knights at the hands of Mordred, the royal bastard. Like evil seeds, Mordred lay down spells that remained dormant until now, the brink of the third millennium. By using powers that transcend time, Mordred can reach into the present. Soon the forces marshaled by these two wizards will clash again and the outcome will transform all of humanity.

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Old 04-24-2011, 02:54 PM
 
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Haunted Ground, hart

 

 

 

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Cutting turf in the peat bogs of his Ireland farm, Brendan McGann occasionally finds old oak beams, oxcarts or tubs of butter and cheese buried ages ago and forgotten. But he's hardly prepared for the gruesome discovery he makes one pleasant April morning: the perfectly preserved head of a woman. So begins Hart's debut thriller, which follows archeologist Cormac Maguire, maverick local detective Garret Devaney, and Nora Gavin, an American anatomist lecturing at Trinity College Medical School, as they investigate the farmer's grisly finding, which could date back quite far, given that peat bogs can preserve bodies for centuries. Cormac and Nora stay in the house of Hugh Osborne, the owner of a decaying manor who also happens to be the prime suspect in the unsolved disappearance of his wife and infant son two years ago. The accommodations are not quite the Ritz. Osborne's dour cousin, Lucy Osborne, is the housekeeper, and her son, 17-year-old Jeremy, who drinks too much, also lurks around the estate. Nora finds a filthy, dead crow on her bed, as well as broken glass littering her bathroom floor. What's going on in this malevolent household? In addition to a complex, multilayered plot that involves both contemporary and historical crimes, Hart's novel is rich in local color: evenings at the pub, the petty feuds and jealousies of the townspeople and the traditional music and folk culture of Ireland are evocatively rendered.
 

 

 

I really, really liked this -- was fascinated by the concept of the bog bodies, and had to do some outside research.  The mystery and romance also all come together really nicely.

 

Impossible, Werlin

 

 

 

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Werlin combines magic, romance, and a family curse in this 21st-century fairy tale based on the ballad "Scarborough Fair." On the night of her prom, Lucy, 17, is raped by her date and becomes pregnant. She decides to keep the child, and she is supported by her foster parents and Zach, her childhood friend whose love for Lucy changes from platonic to romantic as the story progresses. The teen discovers the curse on the women in her family when she reads her birth mother's diary. Lucy is destined for madness at 18 unless she can perform the three impossible tasks described in the song and break the curse of the Elfin Knight. She is determined to rid herself and her unborn child of the curse, and her family and Zach help her as she works to solve the riddles. This unique story flows smoothly and evenly, and the well-drawn characters and subtle hints of magic early on allow readers to enter willingly into the world of fantasy. As in The Rules of Survival (Dial, 2006), Werlin addresses tough topics. Rape, teen pregnancy, and family madness set the story in motion, but the strength of Lucy's character and the love of her family and friends allow her to deal with such difficult matters and take on the impossible.

 

I'm about 3/4 through this and again I'm really liking it.  Lucy's character is remarkable, and the element of magic is woven into everyday life in a believable way.

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Old 04-24-2011, 05:09 PM - Thread Starter
 
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The Paperbark Shoe by Goldie Goldbloom

 

Gin (Virginia) is an albino woman living in Australia during WWII. She does not love her husband or her life but is resigned to it--until two Italian POW's come to work on their farm and for the first time, Gin is loved despite the way she looks. I thought the premise of this book interesting and always love historical fiction, but for me this book began to drag about halfway through and it became almost a chore to finish it. While I thought the writing and story were good, I think some cutting in the second half would have kept me more engrossed.

 

That's three so-so books in a row now . . . I need a good pageturner!


Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
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Old 04-25-2011, 01:01 PM
 
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 I accidentally posted this in March!

Sefafina’s Stories by Rudolfo Anaya

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/a/rudolfo-anaya/serafina-s-stories.htm

What a delight to come upon this book! Anaya has been one of my favourite writer ever since I read Bless me Ultima years ago; however I have not loved all his novels since.

 

Serifna’s stories takes place in the 1600's Santa Fe when New Mexico was the northern most province of New Spain. Based on  the history of clashes between the Spanish and  Native Americans, 12 Pueblo men are rounded up and face trial on charges of plotting a revolution against Spain. One is actually a young 15 year old girl named Serafina!  Like  

Scheherazade in 1001 Nights, Serafina agrees to tell a story to the governor and if he likes the story, he must agree to release one prisoner. Serafina is an excellent storyteller, so by the end of 11 nights all prisoners are released. The tales she tells are real “Cuentos” from New Mexico. Some of them are similar to European Fairy tales but have been New Mexicanized, for example there is one story that bears a resemblance to Cinderella, but instead of a good fairy the Virgin Mary helps! Other stories originated in the Indian subcontinent made their way to New Mexico via Persia then Spain but have  Hispanic and Pueblo characters. . Although this particular governor never existed, the problems as well as the peaceful coexistence between Pueblo and Spanish did.  This novel is a great way to read about the history and culture of the Southwest.   One could be for any age to enjoy this book. I highly recommend it


 

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Old 04-25-2011, 03:54 PM
 
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#21 The Tech Writer's Survival Guide by Janet Van Wicklen

for work, somewhat boring, some good info, a tad outdated....

 

#22 Web Writing/Web Designing by Margaret Batschlet

also for work, good info and a tad outdated

 

#23 The Beekeeper's Apprentice by Laurie R. King

Soooo good.  Story is about a WWI era young woman walking the downs in rural England, she stumbles upon a man observing his beehive, and it turns out he's a retired Sherlock Holmes.  The young woman, Mary Russell, is a very intelligent and precocious young lady and they develop a mentor/mentee relationship.  I LOVED this book, and am super excited to see that there are 10 of them in the series!  Can't wait to read the others.  I'm adding the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle books to my list as well. 

 

#24 The Road by Cormac McCarthy

I've been drawn to this book for some time.  Wanting to read it, but knowing it would be rather unsavory, to say the least.  I took it as a sign it was time to read it when I popped into my tiny library branch and it was on the fiction shelves waiting for me (there are only two big shelves of adult fiction in our library, the rest is holds waiting to be picked up and a rather large childrens/YA section).  Read it in 2 days, somewhat at arm's length.  I'm glad I read it, and found it riveting.  It was easy to tell I was reading Cormac McCarthy, who I find to be an incredible writer, and I also find his style is easy to spot. (bleak, tends to have a hopeless feeling to it, IMHO).  This book, while hard to put down, was the same, bleak, hopeless, AND gruesome.  Glad I'm done with it.

 

#25 The Exile: An Outlander Graphic Novel by Diana Gabaldon

The title says it all, it's part of the Outlander story, from a slightly different perspective, in a graphic novel form.  Fun, quick read.

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