June Book Challenge 2011 - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 52 Old 06-02-2011, 11:34 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I went for it again and started June's thread whistling.gif  Hope y'all don't mind! love.gif

 

 

So, just by way of clarification (for comers both new and old), new and improved guidelines for the Book Challenge Thread are as follows:


1) Post the books you read ... or not
2) Post a recommendation ... or not
3) Number your book ... or not
4) Make a goal for how many books you want to read in 2011 ... or not
5) Have fun with books (This one, unfortunately, is MANDATORY

 

Happy reading everyone!

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#2 of 52 Old 06-02-2011, 11:52 AM - Thread Starter
 
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#26 Social Media Marketing by Liana Evans

 

For work.  Pretty good info.

 

#27 Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder

 

Slowly working through the series with dd on these.  They are enjoyable.  With the occasional need to stop and discuss things (or alter wording--some of the references to Indians were pretty horrible).  We're reading Farmer Boy now.

 

#28 Igraine the Brave by Cornelia Funke

 

Another read aloud with dd.  Fun story of a young woman who would like to be a knight.  Her parents are wizards and so is her brother.  The neighboring castle has a bad guy who wants to take over their castle and steal their magic books, and their home is not guarded with magic right now b/c her parents accidentally turned themselves into talking pigs!  Igraine must go on an adventure for a giant's red chin hairs in order to save her parents, the castle and the magic books.  It's a good story and funny too.

 

#29 An Echo in the Bone by Diana Gabaldon

 

Oh, I just love these books *sigh*  Can't wait for the next one. Quite a cliff hanger ending. 

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#3 of 52 Old 06-03-2011, 04:37 AM
 
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27) Night of the Ninjas Mary POpe Osborne

28)  Northern Light (2003) is an American historical novel by Jennifer Donnelly. In the United Kingdom it was published under the alternative title A Gathering Light. It is based on the Big Moose Lake murder case of 1906, a real event, but unlike Theodore Dreiser's An American Tragedy, also based on the murder, Donnelly's book is concerned more with the life of a young girl who gets caught up in it.

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Museum of Thieves

 

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In the city of Jewel, safety and temperance are prized above all other virtues. Goldie, an impetuous girl with a talent for petty thievery, is eagerly awaiting her Separation, in which her silver guardchain connecting her to her parents for safety is finally cut. When tragedy strikes and the city’s sly and deceptive ruler, the Fugleman, cancels all Separations indefinitely, Goldie decides she’s had enough of safety and runs away to the fascinating, mysterious Museum of Dunt. Yet this museum is no dusty educational edifice, as Goldie soon learns: it has moods and feelings like a living being. Its shape-shifting rooms house not historical artifacts, but great and terrible powers that, if unleashed, could destroy the city...Lian Tanner’s Museum of Thieves is filled with characters who are oddball but meaningful, a dystopia-for-beginners plot that is at once serious and silly, and a pace fast enough to draw in even reluctant readers. The thrilling conclusion teaches that courage and freedom are virtues, too, even if they mean a few scrapes along the way.

 

I'm surprised that this isn't a more popular YA book.  I found the plot fast-moving and enjoyable, and the commentary on society's willingness to protect children from all harm even at the risk of crushing their spirit and adventurousness.

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#5 of 52 Old 06-03-2011, 05:32 PM
 
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Thanks for starting the June thread. I'm starting a new book today . . . will be back to post.


Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
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#6 of 52 Old 06-05-2011, 09:07 AM
 
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29) The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, and more. Henrietta’s cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can’t afford health insurance.

 

This was fantastic. I will never just sign my HIPPA consent forms again! I will be asking questions the next time a tissue sample is taken from me or anyone in my family for testing.

 

30) Afternoon in the Amazon by Mary Pope Osborne

 

31) Taking the Leap: Freeing Ourselves From Old Habits and Fears.Pema Chodron never disappoints. I love how she simply discusses Buddhist teachings. I always feel my heart open up when I read her articles and books. She is one of my favorites.

 

 

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#7 of 52 Old 06-05-2011, 03:44 PM
 
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Never Knowing by Chevy Stevens

 

A woman, Sara, searches for her birth mother and manages to find her . . . only to discover that her father was the notorious "Campsite Killer" and her mother was his only victim to escape. The news is leaked and the Campsite Killer wants to get to know the daughter he didn't know he had. The police think Sara can be the bait so they can finally catch him. Sara is torn between wanting to keep herself and her daughter as safe--and wanting to stop the murder of innocent people by the Campsite Killer.

 

An original and intriguing premise and good plot -- the writing though, particularly the dialogue, was hard to get through and the main character's poor-me attitude was annoying. The premise kept me reading, however, and things really got pretty exciting at the end.

 

 

 

 


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#8 of 52 Old 06-05-2011, 05:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Igraine View Post

31) Taking the Leap: Freeing Ourselves From Old Habits and Fears.Pema Chodron never disappoints. I love how she simply discusses Buddhist teachings. I always feel my heart open up when I read her articles and books. She is one of my favorites.

 

have to agree 100%.  her writings are terrific.

 

finished a book i loved, Journey to the End of Islam by Michael Muhammad Knight.  while anyone could gain something from it, I think the ideal reader should know something about Islam, and about conflicts within the religion.  (his views are not exactly mainstream, so it is not a great primer on Islam or anything.)  i really enjoyed reading about this man's personal journey with his faith.

 

 

 

 



 

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mama to one amazing daughter born 1/2004
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Caribou Island, Vann

 

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On a small island in a glacier-fed lake on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula, a marriage is unraveling. Gary, driven by thirty years of diverted plans, and Irene, haunted by a tragedy in her past, are trying to rebuild their life together. Following the outline of Gary's old dream, they're hauling logs to Caribou Island in good weather and in terrible storms, in sickness and in health, to build the kind of cabin that drew them to Alaska in the first place.

But this island is not right for Irene. They are building without plans or advice, and when winter comes early, the overwhelming isolation of the prehistoric wilderness threatens their bond to the core. Caught in the emotional maelstrom is their adult daughter, Rhoda, who is wrestling with the hopes and disappointments of her own life. Devoted to her parents, she watches helplessly as they drift further apart.

Brilliantly drawn and fiercely honest, Caribou Island captures the drama and pathos of a husband and wife whose bitter love, failed dreams, and tragic past push them to the edge of destruction. A portrait of desolation, violence, and the darkness of the soul, it is an explosive and unforgettable novel from a writer of limitless possibility.

 

 

 

This book was so, so very cold and bleak.  The characters were well-drawn and the setting amazing, but the relationships were simply bleak.

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#10 of 52 Old 06-07-2011, 12:24 PM
 
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76. The Sherlockian by Graham Moore

 

fun stuff.

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#11 of 52 Old 06-08-2011, 08:51 AM
 
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Little Grrl Lost by Charles De Lint http://www.sfsite.com/charlesdelint/littlegrrl-desc01.htm

Whenever I want a fun and entertaining read that leaves me with a good feeling, I know I can’t go wrong with a Charles de Lint Novel. This is another YA novel,part of his Newford series.

 

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#12 of 52 Old 06-08-2011, 08:58 AM
 
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Little Big by John Crowley http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/c/john-crowley/little-big.htm

I was so let down by this novel. From the description it sounded like everything I would like. A fantasy novel about a family that lives among faeries, that takes places in the real world. It covers a large family for 4 generations and has been compared to 100 Years of Solitude, which I loved, so why did I not like this novel?  It was too slow paced, I could not feel for the characters. I actually did not read it to the end which is rare for me. I am just mentioning it here because I am wondering if anyone has read it and liked it?

 

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#13 of 52 Old 06-09-2011, 04:44 AM
 
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Second mention of Charles DeLint who I love. I picked up the Medicine Road that someone recently mentioned. I will also look for "Little Grrl Lost" too. I am reading a A Fine and Private Place is a fantasy novel written by Peter S. Beagle. It is interesting, but taking me a bit longer to read.

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Wow ... the forum looks so different!  Now that I am done with schooling for the foreseeable future, I think I'm going to venture back into reading and reviewing for pleasure and blogging about books, and come back to the forums.  After two years of graduate school I just hope I know how to read for pleasure winky.gif


"A mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge." - Tyrion Lannister

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32) Sunset of the Sabertooth- Mary Pope Osborne

33) A Fine and Private Place is a fantasy novel written by Peter S. Beagle. I enjoyed this book. It had a slower pace and pretty much never left a cemetery. And really focused on relationships, so probably not for everyone. 

 

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June
76. The Sherlockian by Graham Moore
77.The Herring-Seller's Apprentice by L.C. Tyler

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#17 of 52 Old 06-12-2011, 11:01 AM
 
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Welcome back NCD!!!


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#18 of 52 Old 06-12-2011, 11:02 AM
 
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Flip by Martyn Bedford

 

 

14-year-old Alex wakes up one morning--in someone else's bedroom, with someone else's mother calling him. He soon discovers that not only has he lost the last six month of his life--but he lost his body. When he looks in the mirror, he sees someone else--a boy named Philip . . . or Flip as he has been nicknamed. He spends the book trying to find out what happened to him, where his old body is . . . and if he can return to it. 
 
This was very well-written, well-paced story, with a new twist on the concept of body-swapping. This book will appeal to teen boys and girls--and adults as well. Recommended for 13 years and up.

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
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The Magicians, Lev Grossman

 

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Mixing the magic of beloved children's fantasy classics (from Narnia and Oz to Harry Potter and Earthsea) with the sex, excess, angst, and anticlimax of life in college and beyond, Lev Grossman's Magicians reimagines modern-day fantasy for grownups. Quentin Coldwater lives in a state of perpetual melancholy, privately obsessed with his childhood books about the enchanted land of Fillory. When he’s admitted to the surreptitious Brakebills Academy for an education in magic, Quentin finds mastering spells is tedious (and love is even more fraught). He also discovers his power has thrilling potential--though it's unclear what he should do with it once he's moved with his new magician cohorts to New York City. Then they discover the magical land of Fillory is real and launch an expedition to use their powers to set things right in the kingdom--which, naturally, turns out to be a much murkier proposition than expected. The Magicians breathes life into a cast of characters you want to know--if the people you want to know are charismatic, brilliant, complex, flawed magicians--and does what Quentin claims books never really manage to do: "get you out, really out, of where you were and into somewhere better. " Or if not better, at least a heck of a lot more interesting.

 

Loved it.  This book looks at what would happen to the fantasy bore you through your childhood suddenly became real when you were an adult, and the ethical dilemmas that it might bring.  I also truly appreciated the hero, Quentin -- flawed and difficult, perhaps, but certainly real.  While I don't think there were many similarities to HP other than the whole magic school thing, there are obvious parallels to the Narnia series. 

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#20 of 52 Old 06-13-2011, 12:30 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post

Thanks for starting the June thread. I'm starting a new book today . . . will be back to post.



Sure love.gif



Quote:
Originally Posted by Igraine View Post

 

 

 

 

 

29) The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, and more. Henrietta’s cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can’t afford health insurance.

 

This was fantastic. I will never just sign my HIPPA consent forms again! I will be asking questions the next time a tissue sample is taken from me or anyone in my family for testing.

 

30) Afternoon in the Amazon by Mary Pope Osborne

 

31) Taking the Leap: Freeing Ourselves From Old Habits and Fears.Pema Chodron never disappoints. I love how she simply discusses Buddhist teachings. I always feel my heart open up when I read her articles and books. She is one of my favorites.

 

 

Oh, I want to read that Pema Chodron one!  And the Henrietta Lacks one is on my to read list.  I'm fascinated (in a horrified way) that the family receives nothing from the use of her cells.  I guess I should read the book to learn more! thumb.gif

 

 

 


 

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76. The Sherlockian by Graham Moore

 

fun stuff.



Ever since reading Laurie R. King's first Mary and Sherlock book I'm intrigued with Sherlock Holmes.  Tell me more about this one biggrinbounce.gif



Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post

Wow ... the forum looks so different!  Now that I am done with schooling for the foreseeable future, I think I'm going to venture back into reading and reviewing for pleasure and blogging about books, and come back to the forums.  After two years of graduate school I just hope I know how to read for pleasure winky.gif


Welcome back NCD! treehugger.gif

 

 

Let's see, here are my books for right now.....

 

#30 The Total Money Makeover by Dave Ramsey

 

Basic book about getting out of debt, reprogramming the way you think about money and coherent steps on doing so.  Pretty good advice it seems like, and with constructive steps you can take, seems like it's actually helpful.  I'm also doing an e-course on getting to financial freedom (read, no more debt, and living a simpler, cash lifestyle).  The course, in conjunction with this book is really helpful for sure.  I'm about halfway through some other money books too.

 

#31 Girls Like Us, Carole King, Joni Mitchell, and Carly Simon by Sheila Weller

 

My mom's best friend loaned this to me.  I think my mom would have gotten more of a kick out of it, but since she's gone....I read it.  Basically the life story of all 3 women.  Interesting at times, way too detailed at others.  It was kind of long and took me months of start-stop reading to finish it.  Glad to be done with it!  Normally I don't force myself to finish a book, but since my godmother loaned it to me, I sort of felt obligated.  *sigh*

 

#32 Touchstone by Laurie R. King

 

Picked up at the library b/c I liked The Beekeeper's Apprentice so well.  Was not disappointed.  Story about an American FBI agent on his own in England trying to find an English suspect for a rash of bombings in American during the labor riots after WWI.  Fascinating twists and turns and setting.  I read this just after watching Downton Abbey, which was a nice compliment b/c the settings in some parts of the book were pretty similar.

 

#33 The Dip by Seth Godin

 

I picked up a bunch of Seth Godin books from the library to learn more about marketing for work.  This one ended up being really good advice about when to quit.  Now I'm thinking I should probably quit my job and find something new and exciting to do!

 

 

It's interesting, I must be ready for a life change, I've been reading books about money makeovers, quitting, learning more stuff about marketing and social media and website programming and just started reading Chris Guillebeau's The Art of Non-Conformity.  Time for a transformation methinks!

 

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#21 of 52 Old 06-13-2011, 05:53 PM
 
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1. Moon People: The Age of Aquarius

by Dale M. Courtney

 

I reviewed it HERE.

 

 

1. Moon People: The Age of Aquarius,


"A mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge." - Tyrion Lannister

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#22 of 52 Old 06-14-2011, 10:37 PM
 
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2. Go the F**k to Sleep (Audio)

by Adam Mansbach

read by Samuel L. Jackson

 

I reviewed it HERE.

 

 

1. Moon People: The Age of Aquarius, 2. Go the F**k to Sleep (Audio),

Igraine likes this.

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#23 of 52 Old 06-15-2011, 06:38 AM
 
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 Stolen by Kelley Armstrong

 

Kelley Armstrong’s books always feel like a guilty pleasure for me. They are certainly not trashy. They are pretty well written but there is definitely not anything that is in anyway uplifting or enlightening about them. I don't feel good after reading tehm like how I often do with a De Lint or Allende novel. If you want a pure entertaining read with borderline horror,with supernatural characters and lots of suspense they are perfect.

I am pasting a describtion from her website:

http://www.kelleyarmstrong.com/stolen/

When a young witch tells Elena that a group of humans are kidnapping supernaturals, Elena ignores the warning. After all, everyone knows there’s no such thing as witches. As for the thought of other ‘supernaturals’, well, she’d just rather not dwell on the possibility. Soon, however, she’s confronted with the truth about her world, when she’s kidnapped and thrown into a cell-block with witches, sorcerers, half-demons and other werewolves. As Elena soon discovers, dealing with her fellow captives is the least of her worries. In this prison, the real monsters carry the keys.

 

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#24 of 52 Old 06-15-2011, 03:25 PM
 
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34) Medicine Road, Charles DeLint. A nice, easy read. Not as deep and stimulating as some of DeLint's other work that I have read. But an enjoyable book just the same.

35) Midnight on the Moon  Mary Pope Osborne.

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Mystery, Jonathan Kellerman

Quote:

When Lt. Milo Sturgis of LAPD homicide asks psychologist Alex Delaware to view the faceless corpse of a young woman in Kellerman's enjoyable if only average 26th Alex Delaware novel (after Deception), Alex is shocked to recognize the gunshot victim as someone he and wife, Robin, saw the night before in a restaurant bar. A link turns out to exist between the dead woman and a sinister-looking man Alex and Robin observed outside the bar that night. An anonymous tip leads to an online service that matches "sugar daddies" with "star-quality sweeties." The victim, who called herself "Mystery," had a "daddy," Markham McReynolds, whose wealthy, anything-goes family offers plenty of suspects, including McReynolds's wife, two sons, and two daughters-in-law. Kellerman's bantering detectives make it look almost too easy as they put together the clues and possible scenarios, despite the unusual solution to the crime.

 

 

Okay...fairly formulaic but I always enjoy the interaction between Alex and Milo.

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#26 of 52 Old 06-17-2011, 07:02 AM
 
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Promises to Keep by Charles de Lint

 http://www.sfsite.com/charlesdelint/promises-desc01.htm

For all of you who love Jilly Coppercorn from the Newford series!

This novel, although written after, takes place before the other Newford novels, when Jilly is a young art student.

Running into her old friend Donna from the days when  they were both in a juvenile institution, Jilly is invited to see Donna’s band play in a location that (she later finds out) does not exist.  Jilly is lead into a parallel world where most of the inhabitants are actually dead. Everything is perfect in this world and the people living there are able to live out all the dreams that they were unable realise in their former lives.

Even though this novel does deal with some very serious subjects the tone is very uplifting and optimistic. This book was really pleasure to read!

 

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#27 of 52 Old 06-18-2011, 12:42 PM
 
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Miss Timmins' School for Girls by Nayana Curimbhoy

 

 

Young, innocent Charu gets a job as a teacher at a Christian boarding school in India. She is shy and self-conscious about the large "blot" on her face. She ends up in a lesbian affair with another teacher--but after an argument one night--her lover is murdered and Charu becomes one of the suspects.
 
This book had an intriguing premise and lots of interesting tidbits about life in India, but somehow it didn't quite work. The book was way too long and dragged in many places; there were too many characters that the reader never gets to know very well, and the mystery was just all over the place. I also found that the section narrated from the schoolgirl Nandita really didn't add anything to the story. I thought the writing for the most part was good and that was the main reason I made it through the book. I think the author is talented and would try another of her books in the future.
 

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#28 of 52 Old 06-19-2011, 05:55 AM
 
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Save Me, Scottoline

 

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Suburban mom [Rose McKenna] is forced to make a split-second decision after an explosion goes off in the school cafeteria in which she volunteers. Should she rescue her own daughter, Melly, trapped in the bathroom, or lead the girls standing in front of her, who constantly bully her daughter, to safety? Her choice reverberates throughout the little town of Reesburgh, Pennsylvania, as she is cast as the villain by the local news anchor, parents, and the school. While her attorney and husband construct a defense plan that includes filing a lawsuit against the school, [Rose] sets out to seek the truth behind this mysterious, accidental fire. With the help of a construction worker who may know the cause of the explosion as well as an incognito visit to a local factory, [Rose] slowly unravels the truth and along with it some hidden secrets in Reesburgh's dark past, including one horrifying buried memory of her own.

 

Lisa Scottoline is one of my favorite authors -- she sets fast-moving legal dramas in Philadelphia, so I typically really enjoy both the plot and the characterizations of the city.  However, this one fell flat for me.  The beginning, descriptions of the bullying both of child and mom, really set me on edge, and Rose's maneuverings just pushed believability for me.

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

And then, honestly, the reason for the whole conspiracy also just felt ridiculous -- why not just put on the ingredient list that it's produced on factory equipment w/peanuts?  It's really common to say so.  My son doesn't eat M&M's or oreos because they say that.  Rather, let's kill 7 people who know we produce chocolate on equipment with peanuts? 

 

 

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#29 of 52 Old 06-20-2011, 03:34 AM
 
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Moon Over Manifest, Vanderpole

 

 

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After a life of riding the rails with her father, 12-year-old Abilene can’t understand why he has sent her away to stay with Pastor Shady Howard in Manifest, Missouri, a town he left years earlier; but over the summer she pieces together his story. In 1936, Manifest is a town worn down by sadness, drought, and the Depression, but it is more welcoming to newcomers than it was in 1918, when it was a conglomeration of coal-mining immigrants who were kept apart by habit, company practice, and prejudice. Abilene quickly finds friends and uncovers a local mystery. Their summerlong “spy hunt” reveals deep-seated secrets and helps restore residents’ faith in the bright future once promised on the town’s sign. Abilene’s first-person narrative is intertwined with newspaper columns from 1917 to 1918 and stories told by a diviner, Miss Sadie, while letters home from a soldier fighting in WWI add yet another narrative layer. Vanderpool weaves humor and sorrow into a complex tale involving murders, orphans, bootlegging, and a mother in hiding. With believable dialogue, vocabulary and imagery appropriate to time and place, and well-developed characters, this rich and rewarding first novel is “like sucking on a butterscotch. Smooth and sweet.”

 

 

Lovely Newberry-Award winning, middle years historical fiction.  Abilene Tucker begins delving into the past of the town of Manifest hoping to find her father.  What she finds instead is a place for herself, a young girl who has never had one after years of riding the rails with her dad.

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#30 of 52 Old 06-21-2011, 04:08 AM
 
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36) Dolphins at Daybreak Mary Pope Osborne

37) Left Neglected Lisa Genova

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