What's the best book you've read this year? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#31 of 69 Old 06-22-2013, 12:14 AM
 
tillymonster's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Central Coast California
Posts: 1,020
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The Hunger Games series was very good. A little more brutal and shocking then I thought a book for "young adults" should be but I am sensitive. I thought the movie was really really good! That's not the general rule for books like these I think. The first book is still my favorite.

I enjoyed the actors from the movie so much I think I'd not feel like the book was ruined. You could skip the first book but I have to say-- the intensity of when Katniss first enters the Games is a page turner. I read the series twice! You also have some time to get to the second book before the movie. smile.gif

Going to check out that list from Real Simple and this Nuture Shock sounds *really* interesting. I'm pregnant with my 2nd so it's good timing!
cynthia mosher and swede like this.

geek.gif Mama + superhero.gifDaddy +energy.gifDD (12/20/09) = heartbeat.gif

Expecting stork-girl.gif #2 in September!

tillymonster is offline  
#32 of 69 Old 06-22-2013, 06:52 AM - Thread Starter
Administrator
 
cynthia mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Arabia!
Posts: 38,889
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)

Thanks tillymonster. I am putting the Hunger Games on my list. :)


cynthia mosher is offline  
#33 of 69 Old 06-22-2013, 07:00 AM
 
mama Adhiambo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: SD
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I've read The Hunger Games series several times and have thoroughly enjoyed them. I think that even though they are labeled Young Adult they are thought provoking and intense enough for adults to read too. Also, I watched the movie first but there is so much more detail to the book. For example, Katniss in the tree before she knocks out the tracker jacker nest is a whole chapter. Whereas, in the movie this part is over quick. It is a very good, page-turning series.

 

The Memory Keeper's Daughter by Kim Edwards is a good book too. It's about a doctor who gives away his newborn daughter because she has down syndrome and tells his wife that she was a stillborn baby. This daughter has a twin brother. It starts out in the early sixties and follows the two families as the children grow up.


Single mom of a 5 yo
mama Adhiambo is offline  
#34 of 69 Old 06-22-2013, 07:05 AM - Thread Starter
Administrator
 
cynthia mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Arabia!
Posts: 38,889
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mama Adhiambo View Post

The Memory Keeper's Daughter by Kim Edwards is a good book too. It's about a doctor who gives away his newborn daughter because she has down syndrome and tells his wife that she was a stillborn baby. This daughter has a twin brother. It starts out in the early sixties and follows the two families as the children grow up.

 

Ooooohhhhh. This sounds like something I'd enjoy. Thanks! thumb.gif


cynthia mosher is offline  
#35 of 69 Old 06-22-2013, 10:17 AM
 
homeschoolingmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 958
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monica S View Post

Two of my favorite novels: 

 

1) Middlesex - by Jeffrey Eugenides

 

This is the 1st person narrative of a hermaphrodite. A beautiful story - be warned that this is a page turner! - Can't wait for a movie to be made out of it and hope it will be as good as the book. 

 

 

2) The Giver - by Louis Lowry 

 

This is more of a sad, dystopian novel. I read it on my Kindle in December 2011, while I was on a backpacking trip in Patagonia, trying to stay warm in my tent, in a place where the sun is up until almost midnight. A surreal environment to read and finish such a surreal book. Apparently it is considered a children's novel. You can read more about it here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Giver  - but you may not want to, as it also contains plot spoilers. 

 

The giver reminds me of  pre teen books called Uglies, Pretties, Specials and Extras.  Great books.  Not usually my genre but catchy.  It is a world of perfect people and a perfect world and when kids turn 16 they are turned pretty like everyone else.  Very thought provoking and interesting.

My favorite book is The Kitchen House.

homeschoolingmama is online now  
#36 of 69 Old 06-22-2013, 10:30 AM
 
mama amie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 477
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just began reading Raising Freethinkers, which is written by Dale McGowan, who also wrote Parenting Beyond Belief. If this subject of encouraging critical thinking and curiosity is your cup of tea, I would highly recommend this. Even though I just began reading it, I can tell it is one that I will buy and refer to often.
mama amie is offline  
#37 of 69 Old 06-22-2013, 12:59 PM
 
Smokering's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 8,610
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:

 

I read Bryson's "A Walk in the Woods" and really enjoyed it. He also has a "A Short History of Nearly Everything" that I have on my list as a possible. Have you read that one?

I haven't - I've just read whatever I can find at the library or borrow from SIL, and haven't come across that one. I've read his one about domestic life - "Home"? Can't remember the title. The history of houses, basically - very interesting. And "A Walk in the Woods", and "Notes from a Big Country" (about the USA), and... a few travel ones. "Bill Bryson Down Under", I think. Anyway, he's consistently engaging and obviously very knowledgeable, and makes sharing knowledge fun - he reminds me of Stephen Fry in that regard, but less tweedy - so I imagine anything he writes is probably worth checking out.

 

I also enjoyed The Hunger Games. Not great literature perhaps, but excellent page-turners. My little sister made me read them, and it was before I knew they were a huge phenomenon (which is just as well, or I probably would have been too snobby to enjoy 'em!) - and I haven't been so engrossed in a series for years. Marvellous fun.

 

Lois Lowry is one of my favourite writers. If you want a tearjerker, "A Summer to Die" is FANTASTIC. It's about the relationship between two sisters, and one has cancer... hard to describe and hard to get hold of, but I really really love it. Never fails to send me into gusts of sobbing. :p


If decomposition persists please see your necromancer.

Smokering is offline  
#38 of 69 Old 06-22-2013, 03:23 PM - Thread Starter
Administrator
 
cynthia mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Arabia!
Posts: 38,889
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokering View Post

 

Lois Lowry is one of my favourite writers. If you want a tearjerker, "A Summer to Die" is FANTASTIC. It's about the relationship between two sisters, and one has cancer... hard to describe and hard to get hold of, but I really really love it. Never fails to send me into gusts of sobbing. :p

 

I found it on Amazon! A Summer to Die. It's in my cart. thumb.gif Her book The Giver has almost 4000 reviews on amazon. Looks like people like that one. 


cynthia mosher is offline  
#39 of 69 Old 06-23-2013, 12:38 AM
 
Viola's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Nevada
Posts: 23,391
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cynthia Mosher View Post

I read Bryson's "A Walk in the Woods" and really enjoyed it. He also has a "A Short History of Nearly Everything" that I have on my list as a possible. Have you read that one?

I read the second one, and I enjoyed it.  

Viola is online now  
#40 of 69 Old 06-23-2013, 07:32 AM
 
mamazee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: US midwest
Posts: 7,500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I love everything by Bill Bryson. And The Giver is part of a 4-book series, and all four are great.
mamazee is offline  
#41 of 69 Old 06-23-2013, 08:53 AM - Thread Starter
Administrator
 
cynthia mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Arabia!
Posts: 38,889
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)
cynthia mosher is offline  
#42 of 69 Old 06-23-2013, 06:00 PM
 
zbugmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)

I actually read it last summer but Cutting for Stone was an amazing read.

 

And ditto what's been said about Hunger Games and Lois Lowry.  Sometimes "young adult" novels make perfect summer reading since you can easily squeeze one in in an evening or nap or whenever.  I think the Giver is part of a series as well; the latest, Son, came out pretty recently.

HappyHappyMommy and swede like this.
zbugmama is offline  
#43 of 69 Old 07-02-2013, 04:54 PM
 
HappyHappyMommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 5,922
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cynthia Mosher View Post

So, what are the best books you've read this year?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cynthia Mosher View Post
a good true story would be great too. smile.gif

 

The best book I've read in the last year (and really the best book I've read in the last 10 years) is Zen Under Fire by Marianne Elliott. I absolutely love the book and really can't say enough good things about it. I was so impressed by the combination of a very intimate and easy to relate to narrative of one’s relationship with oneself and others and the impacts of both stress and self-care with a narrative of peacekeeping in Afghanistan. I really appreciated the discussion of what it means to do good and create change in an environment of war, and how much it brought up for me about breaking boundaries and making human connections. I've recommended the book to several family members and friends (who have a variety of tastes) and all of them have found it interesting and many have said that they loved it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cynthia Mosher View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokering View Post

 

Lois Lowry is one of my favourite writers. If you want a tearjerker, "A Summer to Die" is FANTASTIC. It's about the relationship between two sisters, and one has cancer... hard to describe and hard to get hold of, but I really really love it. Never fails to send me into gusts of sobbing. :p

 

I found it on Amazon! A Summer to Die. It's in my cart. thumb.gif

 

Lois Lowry was one of my favorite writers growing up and I still like her books as an adult. A Summer to Die is a wonderful book and includes an unassisted birth.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by zbugmama View Post

I actually read it last summer but Cutting for Stone was an amazing read.

 

I'm reading Cutting for Stone now and quite liking it.

cynthia mosher likes this.

hh2.gif Head over to the Holiday Helper forum and be a part of this wonderful Mothering tradition! joy.gif

Wondering about Mothering in general? Check out Mothering's User Agreement! smile.gif

HappyHappyMommy is offline  
#44 of 69 Old 07-02-2013, 05:08 PM
 
Catholic Mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 774
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)

I read "The Giver" when I was giving up too and agree that it is a good book.

 

The best book I read so far this year (thank God it's only half over, lots of time left to read good books between/after parenting!) is "The Story of a Family: The Home of St. Therese of Lisieux" by Fr. Stephane-Joseph Piat, O.F.M. From the back cover:

 

 

 

Quote:
Pope St. Pius X called St. Therese the Little Flower "the greatest Saint of modern times"; Pope Pius XI declared her co-patroness of the Missions throughout the entire world with St. Francis Xavier; and Pope Pius XII declared her co-patroness of France with St. Joan of Arc. Yet St. Therese died at just 24, having been a Carmelite nun only 9 years. What was the secret of her greatness? Giants in any sphere of human endeavor stand on the shoulders of giants. Nobody gets to Heaven alone. We are all what our birth, our families, our education, our country, etc. have helped to make us.
In The Story of a Family, Fr. Stephane-Joseph Piat has masterfully reconstructed for us the lives of Louis and Zelie Martin, St. Therese's parents, as well as those of her four sisters and near relatives, plus her own early life. In the process, he has produced one of the most moving books a Catholic will likely ever encounter. The life of the Martin family, though disciplined, ordered and holy, was far from being a calm, serene, uninterrupted joy. Louis and Zelie married relatively late in life - 35 and 28 - had 9 children, of whom 4 died in infancy or quite young; they lived through the Franco - Prussian War (1870-71) and had to quarter German troops in their home; each ran a separate small business; as parents, they struggled with severe childhood illnesses in their children, plus a host of other problems; Zelie died of cancer at only 45, when Therese was just 4, leaving Louis to raise her and the other children. All 5 of Louis' and Zelie's daughters entered religion. [became nuns] For a time, during his declining years, Louis had to be cared for in a severe debility by first a sanatorium and then by relatives. But Louis and Zelie met all their troubles with faith and heroism, such that the Martin girls, their relatives and even the parish priest declared that Louis and Zelie were saints.
The Story of a Family is a tender and touching panorama of Catholic family life at its very best, a story that will thrill, motivate and inspire Catholic families so long as faith is alive. Whoever takes up this story is in for one of the great reading experiences of his life. For this story tears at the heart-strings as it reveals the making of a great, great Saint in the family context of what certainly has to have been the flower of French Catholic life.

Sorry, I don't know how to write the accents on Zelie's and Therese's names.

cynthia mosher likes this.

May God bless you and His Blessed Mother Mary keep you!  :-)

Catholic Mama is offline  
#45 of 69 Old 07-03-2013, 05:48 AM
 
michelleepotter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 978
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The best books I have read this year, hands down, were Name of the Wind and The Wise Man's Fear by Patrick Rothfuss. (It's going to be a trilogy, but book three isn't out yet). They are fantasy, and good fantasy, but it's also the story of an amazing young man who has had a very difficult life. I seriously think Rothfuss is the Tolkien of our generation. The books are kind of long, but they're page-turners, not difficult reads at all. Anyone who enjoys a good story should check them out.
cynthia mosher likes this.

Michelle, wife to DH, and momma to DD16, DS15, DS12, DS10, DD9, DD7, DS5, and baby girl born Christmas Eve 2013!
michelleepotter is offline  
#46 of 69 Old 07-03-2013, 02:14 PM
 
Smokering's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 8,610
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)

Speaking of Tolkien, I borrowed a Simon Tolkien from the library. He's Tolkien's grandson. The book's a murder mystery - I'm only a few chapters in. Can't remember the title (probably not a good sign!) It's OK so far - nothing remotely like Tolkien, but then, there's no real reason it should be. :p I doubt it'll make my 'best books' list, but I'll keep reading for the family connexion.

 

HappyHappyMommy, I forgot about the unassisted birth in A Summer to Die! It's been ages since I read it. Yeah, that was cool....

 

My copy of 'Life of Pi' arrived yesterday - I've only read the intro. DD, who's five and can only painstakingly read carefully-selected sentences along the lines of "The bee is in the tree", spent a good fifteen minutes 'reading' it on the couch. Weirdo. Her verdict? "Some of this book is quite amoosing." Oookay.

cynthia mosher likes this.

If decomposition persists please see your necromancer.

Smokering is offline  
#47 of 69 Old 07-04-2013, 03:31 AM
 
Serafina33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Far from home!
Posts: 1,422
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I read Wild by Cheryl Strayed recently and really enjoyed it.

 

I read Life of Pi a decade ago when pregnant for the first time and really enjoyed it.  Have not seen the movie.

cynthia mosher likes this.

nak.gif Relentless mommy of 2 mancubs, 8 & 10 years old.... and now a little lady (Oct 2013)!      computergeek2.gif   http://relentlessmommy.com   
Serafina33 is offline  
#48 of 69 Old 07-04-2013, 07:40 PM
 
babydanielsmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: a small town in NC
Posts: 395
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

this is an awesome series...it had me missing sleep because I was up so late reading :)

 

 

http://elementalmysteries.com/books/

cynthia mosher likes this.

Jess  SAHM to Daniel  (09/07) and Samuel  (06/10)and Katie Lee (11/11) we're with #4 edd 4/15 Wifey to my "geek" : David  for 14 yrs. ( 4/09 @ 19 weeks).
babydanielsmom is offline  
#49 of 69 Old 07-05-2013, 01:19 AM
 
Serafina33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Far from home!
Posts: 1,422
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Alexander McCall Smith has four series I love. No 1 ladies detective agency, 44 Scotland st, Isabel Dalhousie, and corduroy mansions.
Love them all. Reading before I sleep is great nightmare prevention.
cynthia mosher likes this.

nak.gif Relentless mommy of 2 mancubs, 8 & 10 years old.... and now a little lady (Oct 2013)!      computergeek2.gif   http://relentlessmommy.com   
Serafina33 is offline  
#50 of 69 Old 07-05-2013, 07:45 PM
 
demeter888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Pinellas County, FL
Posts: 334
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

The best book I have read this year is The Highly Sensitive Person by Elain Aron.  I always thought I was just picky, spoiled, lazy, oversensitive, odd, over-privileged, whimpy, Etc, until I read this book.  It has changed my life, made me feel so much better about myself, and helped my relationships with others hugely.

 

Basically, the idea is that a large minority of people are born with much, much more active nervous systems than others, affecting a very wide but easily distinguishable range of preferences, habits, reactions, Etc.  

 

It's sort of a new, much more useful spin on introversion.  In fact, highly sensitive people aren't all introverted, either.

 

I found this book because my mother has a sensory processing disorder and I was looking for something to understand her. Strangely enough, she is not highly sensitive but my dad and I are.

 

ETA: The only non-fiction I read in recent years was the Song of Ice and Fire series.  Anyone who has read it themselves can probably understand why I have taken a break from the genre.  

cynthia mosher and Monica S like this.
demeter888 is offline  
#51 of 69 Old 07-09-2013, 05:01 PM
 
Sativarain1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,875
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyHappyMommy View Post

 

The best book I've read in the last year (and really the best book I've read in the last 10 years) is Zen Under Fire by Marianne Elliott. I absolutely love the book and really can't say enough good things about it. I was so impressed by the combination of a very intimate and easy to relate to narrative of one’s relationship with oneself and others and the impacts of both stress and self-care with a narrative of peacekeeping in Afghanistan. I really appreciated the discussion of what it means to do good and create change in an environment of war, and how much it brought up for me about breaking boundaries and making human connections. I've recommended the book to several family members and friends (who have a variety of tastes) and all of them have found it interesting and many have said that they loved it.

 

 

 hola.gif

 

I just saw this today in a magazine while browsing Barnes n Noble. It looks like a great book. Our library doesn't own it yet. Does it contain anything that could be triggering? violence?


"If you truly love nature, you will find beauty everywhere." -Vincent Van Gogh
Sativarain1 is online now  
#52 of 69 Old 07-10-2013, 11:29 AM
 
ollyoxenfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)

Recommending a novel, but it's a heartbreaking story. 419 by Will Ferguson.

 

It is about the various people caught up in the internet scams from Nigeria. You get the perspective of the victims and the perpetrators, as well as their families and others around them. It's on my DD's reading list for an English lit. course that she is taking in conjunction with a travel/study/volunteer trip to Tanzania. It was not easy to read it before she left on her trip. There's nothing like a story of despair and violence and cruelty to add to a mom's anxieties. It is thought-provoking and illuminating and engrossing though. 

cynthia mosher and Monica S like this.
ollyoxenfree is offline  
#53 of 69 Old 07-16-2013, 05:22 AM
 
ollyoxenfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cynthia Mosher View Post

I'm looking at Amazon's Best Books of 2012. Anyone read anyone of these?

 

The Round House

 

 

 

Highly recommend it. I just finished this book. It is excellent. It is another heartbreaking story but with laugh-out-loud doses of humour. Great characters. I loved the glimpses into Native American reservation life. In one of those coincidences that seems to happen when I read different books, there were some similar themes/questions with my previous recommendation, 419 by Will Ferguson. Both have foundations of historic injustices and the exploitation of indigenous populations by colonizers. Notably, I was left thinking about the burden of past history and the quest for justice by later generations. For how long and for how many generations?   

 

At first, I wanted to hear more of the voice of mother of the narrator/central character. I was even a little irked that I wasn't getting more from her perspective. It's probably the only issue I had. Once I let that go, I became thoroughly immersed in the book. 

cynthia mosher likes this.
ollyoxenfree is offline  
#54 of 69 Old 07-16-2013, 10:43 AM
 
Serafina33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Far from home!
Posts: 1,422
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I'm loving all these recommendations!

cynthia mosher likes this.

nak.gif Relentless mommy of 2 mancubs, 8 & 10 years old.... and now a little lady (Oct 2013)!      computergeek2.gif   http://relentlessmommy.com   
Serafina33 is offline  
#55 of 69 Old 07-18-2013, 05:13 PM
 
Montse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 415
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Funny!  I am currently reading The Woman in White!  I love Victorian lit and I'm really enjoying it!
 

cynthia mosher likes this.
Montse is offline  
#56 of 69 Old 07-19-2013, 11:22 AM
 
xristinaki's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

'watership down'....one of the  best books i have ever read...very good animation movie too...it is considered a children's book (it is a story that the writer once told his little daughters before sleep)..but in my opinion it has very deep meanings about our 'civilised' world, freedom and society ,it has inspired many...i even find out that an album of a band was based on the story.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watership_Down

xristinaki is offline  
#57 of 69 Old 08-19-2013, 04:47 PM
 
ollyoxenfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cynthia Mosher View Post

I'm looking at Amazon's Best Books of 2012. Anyone read anyone of these?

 

Gone Girl

 

 

Finished it this afternoon and thought I'd post here about it since it was mentioned in the thread, with mixed reviews, a few times. I've read reviews elsewhere. I know some people hate it and some people love it. I think there is some very good writing and overall I am impressed with it but I understand why people wouldn't enjoy it. 

 

It reminded me of The Bonfire of the Vanities by Tom Wolfe. There is a lot of biting social commentary and pretty much every single character is unlikeable. For the record, I read Bonfire in the 1980's when I was in my 20's and hated it, especially because I couldn't find a sympathetic character to latch onto. I don't know if I'm more cynical now or more tolerant, but that aspect of Gone Girl didn't really bother me.

 

I anticipated the plot twists, so I didn't find any real surprises or shocks in the book. I honestly don't know whether to recommend it because it's one of those books that it really depends on the reader. It's a fast read, so there isn't a huge investment to find out if you are one of the people who likes it or hates it.  

cynthia mosher and swede like this.
ollyoxenfree is offline  
#58 of 69 Old 08-19-2013, 06:18 PM - Thread Starter
Administrator
 
cynthia mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Arabia!
Posts: 38,889
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)

Thanks for sharing your impressions. I'm saving Gone Girl to decide on later. It's midway down my list at the moment and I bump things up to the top and others down to the bottom as I work through my wish list. orngbiggrin.gif 

 

Right now I'm reading Your Hidden Food Allergies Are Making You FAT by Roger Deutsch and Rudy Rivera MD. Very interesting stuff!


cynthia mosher is offline  
#59 of 69 Old 08-20-2013, 05:17 AM
 
Serafina33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Far from home!
Posts: 1,422
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I have been thinking about Gone Girl for awhile and I think I'm going to skip it unless I really cannot find a novel and need one.  :)


nak.gif Relentless mommy of 2 mancubs, 8 & 10 years old.... and now a little lady (Oct 2013)!      computergeek2.gif   http://relentlessmommy.com   
Serafina33 is offline  
#60 of 69 Old 08-22-2013, 07:43 AM
 
ollyoxenfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serafina33 View Post

I have been thinking about Gone Girl for awhile and I think I'm going to skip it unless I really cannot find a novel and need one.  :)

 

After mulling over the book for a few days, I think it's an interesting but challenging exploration of misogyny. I realized I can't discuss my thoughts without spoilers but I think it's fascinating how Flynn chose to deal with that issue. For me, the book was worth reading for that alone. 

ollyoxenfree is offline  
Reply

Tags
Education Books , Parenting Books , Book Clubs , Media

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off