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#121 of 222 Old 01-11-2005, 02:23 PM
 
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The Shattering- The Guardians of Ga'Hoole Book 5 by Kathryn Lasky. A YA book about owls- I read in Family Fun magazine that it was a good read for young adults. Here is the lowdown (from Scholastic):

"In the midst of war, Eglantine unwittingly becomes a spy for Kludd, leader of the Pure Ones (a group of evil owls). She is brainwashed by an owl sent by the Pure Ones to infiltrate the Great Ga'Hoole Tree. Her odd behavior eventually attracts attention, and Soren and his friends vow to find out what's wrong with Eglantine. They ultimately learn what happened and help her reverse the effects of the brainwashing. Kludd continues to battle against the Guardians of Ga'Hoole for control of their tree. In the end, Kludd and his forces are defeated. But his conflict with Soren is not yet over."

Not bad, but not as good as the previous books in the series.



1) Daughter of God
2) The Lovely Bones
3) The Shattering



megangaia, to make your titles bold, you just have to highlight the title and click on the B above the text boxto the left, or click on the B and then type the title in the box that pops up.
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#122 of 222 Old 01-11-2005, 05:57 PM
 
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I have spent much of my day laying around, covered in my fleece blanket reading from The Memory of Running (book #2), which I finally finished. I found it to be a really good read, and I would recommend it. It's not exactly what I expected, but I couldn't put it down. It's about Smithy who takes his bike across the USA to get his sister, and the story becomes a coming to age journey of a 40 year old man. This trip allows him to let go of his past and create a better future. I even cried at the end.

Jen - Mama to V (b. 2-18-09) and AJ (b. 10-9-11) Wife to DH

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#123 of 222 Old 01-12-2005, 01:24 PM
 
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#2 The Five People You Meet in Heaven, by Mitch Albom. Another one that I think has been discussed, but here is the Amazon description:
Eddie is a wounded war veteran, an old man who has lived, in his mind, an uninspired life. His job is fixing rides at a seaside amusement park. On his 83rd birthday, a tragic accident kills him as he tries to save a little girl from a falling cart. He awakes in the afterlife, where he learns that heaven is not a destination. It's a place where your life is explained to you by five people, some of whom you knew, others who may have been strangers. One by one, from childhood to soldier to old age, Eddie's five people revisit their connections to him on earth, illuminating the mysteries of his "meaningless" life, and revealing the haunting secret behind the eternal question: "Why was I here?"


A very fast read, only took a couple of hours. It was an interesting idea, but I don't think the author totally pulled it off. I loved Tuesdays with Morrie, so I was a bit disappointed. Oh well, I've already started #3....
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#124 of 222 Old 01-12-2005, 09:29 PM
 
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Been away from my computer a few days so here is my current list:


#5 Emma - Jane Austen

Jane is one of my faves...

Of all Jane Austen's heroines, Emma Woodhouse is the most flawed, the most infuriating, and, in the end, the most endearing. Pride and Prejudice's Lizzie Bennet has more wit and sparkle; Catherine Morland in Northanger Abbey more imagination; and Sense and Sensibility's Elinor Dashwood certainly more sense--but Emma is lovable precisely because she is so imperfect. Austen only completed six novels in her lifetime, of which five feature young women whose chances for making a good marriage depend greatly on financial issues, and whose prospects if they fail are rather grim. Emma is the exception: "Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her." One may be tempted to wonder what Austen could possibly find to say about so fortunate a character. The answer is, quite a lot.

For Emma, raised to think well of herself, has such a high opinion of her own worth that it blinds her to the opinions of others. The story revolves around a comedy of errors: Emma befriends Harriet Smith, a young woman of unknown parentage, and attempts to remake her in her own image. Ignoring the gaping difference in their respective fortunes and stations in life, Emma convinces herself and her friend that Harriet should look as high as Emma herself might for a husband--and she zeroes in on an ambitious vicar as the perfect match. At the same time, she reads too much into a flirtation with Frank Churchill, the newly arrived son of family friends, and thoughtlessly starts a rumor about poor but beautiful Jane Fairfax, the beloved niece of two genteelly impoverished elderly ladies in the village. As Emma's fantastically misguided schemes threaten to surge out of control, the voice of reason is provided by Mr. Knightly, the Woodhouse's longtime friend and neighbor. Though Austen herself described Emma as "a heroine whom no one but myself will much like," she endowed her creation with enough charm to see her through her most egregious behavior, and the saving grace of being able to learn from her mistakes. By the end of the novel Harriet, Frank, and Jane are all properly accounted for, Emma is wiser (though certainly not sadder), and the reader has had the satisfaction of enjoying Jane Austen at the height of her powers.

#6 The Dark Angel - Meredith Ann Pierce

I wasn't sure I was going to like it at the beginning but once I finally got into it I finished it too soon. Have to look for it's sequels. It's a teen novel.

Sorry Amazon doesn't have more of a description: The servant girl Aeriel must choose between destroying her vampire master for his evil deeds or saving him for the sake of his beauty and the spark of goodness she has seen in him.

#7 Ritual of Proof - Dara Joy

I really liked this one, a very different way of looking at the world especially if you like romance novels like I do. I will be looking for more of hers as well.

In a world where women hold all the power, a titled man can do little but accept his fate -- that his sole purpose is to secure a good match -- and hope his "bed price" is high enough. Jorlan Reynard has every trait necessary for that price -- he is staggeringly handsome. Irresistible. Wildly sensual. But he is also impossibly willful.

The brash male refuses to be taken by just any woman merely because she can afford him.

Only one -- the Marquelle Green Tamryn -- can claim him. In a bold move, the powerful aristocrat marries him, offering him the security of her name and position, But there are forces conspiring against her, and the

Marquelle must summon all her considerable influence to fight for their survival. However, he is not only a passionate lover, but an unexpectedly powerful ally...and soon, the full truth of his remarkable abilities will begin to be revealed to all -- in the Ritual of Proof.

***

I currently have At Grandmother Table & The Memory of Running sitting on my to read pile with a couple of others, so on to my comfy chair now that ds has settled in early.

My family of 3 (plus pup) Indigo (Aimee), Rob (dp), Ryne (ds) & Phebe (dog), plus my BIL's family of 3.

 
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#125 of 222 Old 01-13-2005, 11:49 AM
 
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I finally finished my first book! I got caught up in a project at work, so it's been slow.

I read Living History , Hillary Clinton's memoirs of her life from her childhood until being elected to the Senate. I actually found it fascinating - I was interested in learning more about the policy initiatives she worked on as First Lady, like health reform, and also about her international work in women's rights, which I was less aware of before reading the book. Obviously, some of it is less than candid - she's still a public figure - but overall I was very impressed.
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#126 of 222 Old 01-13-2005, 01:07 PM
 
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#7 Pledged

I think a description was posted previously which was where I got the recommendation for this book.

Well, I finally managed to plod my way through this book. Although some of the information was interesting I found this book hard to read and pretty boring. I thought the author did a terrible job of drawing us into the characters and their stories. I didn't think she really presented any information that I didn't already know about sororities even though I have never been in one and don't know anyone who has. The only surprise for me was the incredible amount of alcholol being consumed by these kids. Very scary!

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
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#127 of 222 Old 01-13-2005, 01:42 PM
 
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cathe - PLEDGED did lack depth, was more in it for the shock value for sure. it was also very slanted, I was in a soroity for 1.5 years in Boulder, way mellow greek scene compaired to the South greek system - the one thing she did represent well was the alcohol scene - it is insane - but that is the case at many schools regardless of ones involvement in the greek system...which is a scary situation!
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#128 of 222 Old 01-13-2005, 07:57 PM
 
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#3 Skipping Christmas by John Grisham. I'm sure everyone knows about this one by now, especially with the movie that is out. DH got this book for Christmas, so I figured I would give it a try. Ugh. I really think John should stick with the legal tales. The story was kinda silly, and just lacked substance. I know it was just fluff reading, but I still feel like I wasted a few hours. : Oh well, there are always a few bad ones in between the great reads!!
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#129 of 222 Old 01-13-2005, 08:07 PM
 
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I felt that way about Skipping Christmas too. No way would I see the movie.

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
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#130 of 222 Old 01-14-2005, 01:31 PM
 
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Most of what I read is fluff.

#1 If I Should Die by Judith Kelman.

From Amazon:

Fear made their hearts race, palms sweat, breaths come in panicked gasps. Dr. Maggie Lyon's phobia patients sat in their therapy group, imprisoned by their own secret terrors, depending on her to set them free . . . "The bridge was just a few steps away, and Macklin felt himself running toward it, no longer afraid--even when he climbed up on the railing, even when his scream echoed as he tumbled all the long way down. The speedometer climbed toward 100, and the driver squealed in delight. She never be teased about being "The Snail" agian as she raced down the highway toward the sharp curve and a fiery dive to death. Dr. Maggie Lyons felt a chill when she heard about the suicide and the accident. Two of her patients were dead, and the authorities believed she was to blame. Unless someone had murdered them. Detective Sam Bannister thought so, and now Maggie felt the growing threat of someone in the darkness . . . someone who knew her weakness . . . someone waiting to unleash the dear that kills.


It was ok, not her best work.


#2 The Things We Do For Love By Kristin Hannah

From Amazon:

Best-selling Hannah's latest sensitive tale explores the need we all have for love in a portrait of two women of different ages and backgrounds. Angie Malone has come back to her small Washington State town after suffering the loss of a child, the end of a marriage, and the death of her father. Nestled in the bosom of her family, she tries to help with their failing restaurant. Her mother and sisters are glad she's home but realize that she needs something more as she copes with her grief, yet when Angie reaches out to 18-year-old Lauren Ribido, who seeks a job at the restaurant, they worry that she'll be disappointed. Lauren has not had an easy life. Her mother is an alcoholic who reminds Lauren constantly that she was a mistake and is the reason for their poverty, but Lauren is trying to rise above her circumstances through hard work and a quest for a college scholarship. Angie becomes attached to her and acts like a surrogate mother as they embark on a shaky friendship. Hannah captures the joy and heartache of family as she draws the reader into the lives of her characters and makes them feel like personal friends, proving once again why she is a star of women's fiction. Patty Engelmann
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved


I really enjoyed this one. I love her work. I haven't read a book of hers I didn't like.

Serenity LDS mommy to 4 rambunctious kidlets
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#131 of 222 Old 01-14-2005, 02:20 PM
 
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#8 Fairytale - Maggie Shayne

Total fluff but a fun read...

From Library Journal
Sent by their fairy mother from the magical world of Rush into the human world in a desperate effort to save their lives, young twins Brigit and Bridin are separated by chance and raised apart. Now, years later, the time has come for them to return to Rush; but they must pass through the enchanted portal together, and time is limited. It is this story that underlies the romance that develops between flower shop owner Brigit, who senses she's different but doesn't quite know why, and scholar Adam Reid, who is destined to help her return to Rush. Art forgery, a touch of evil, and a lot of magic combine in a sensual story that, despite an obvious but charming ending, is truly a fairy tale. Shayne (Out of This World Marriage, Silhouette, 1995) lives in central New York.-KR

My family of 3 (plus pup) Indigo (Aimee), Rob (dp), Ryne (ds) & Phebe (dog), plus my BIL's family of 3.

 
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#132 of 222 Old 01-14-2005, 02:53 PM
 
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#5- Unexpected by Lori Foster. Much raunchier than I expected it to be.

From amazon.:
"When Eli Conner's wanna-be photojournalist brother, Jeremy, is kidnapped by Central American guerillas, Eli seeks a mercenary who can go into the treacherous jungles and rescue his younger sibling. Ray Vereker answers the call. Ray is tough, courageous, muscular, and female. After watching her win a bar fight, Eli agrees to let Ray save Jeremy--providing he comes along, but the rescue is infinitely easier for Ray than the aftermath of her adventure. A night of wild passion with Eli in the jungle has left her pregnant. An alpha woman with no domestic or maternal skills, a wealthy businessman with a mysterious background, and a most unappreciative rescued hostage give this book a distinctive flavor. In fact, Foster has created a dazzingly unique heroine, and readers will cheer as Ray fearlessly saves herself--and everyone else--from dangerous situations. Known for her funny, sexy writing, Foster doesn't hesitate to turn up the heat, and readers who like sensual romances and novels by Thea Devine, Vicki Lewis Thompson, and Susan Johnson will go for this winning mix of feminism and erotica. Shelley Mosley
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved


#6- The Amethyst Heart by Penelope Stokes I really liked this book.

From Publishers Weekly
Stokes (The Blue Bottle Club) offers an earnest but predictable Christian novel chronicling six generations of the Noble family of Cambridge, Miss. At age 93, Amethyst Noble, fighting to save her family home from a greedy and shiftless son, recounts the family history for her great-granddaughter. Her story begins in the antebellum era, when Silas Noble, a young white doctor from Baltimore, comes to Mississippi fresh from medical school and is won over to the abolitionist cause. Befriending a slave called Booker, he helps the man and his family escape to freedom during the Civil War. Silas and his wife, Pearl, like their granddaughter Amethyst, are too good to be true, and their long, preachy speeches make the eyes glaze over. The narrative skirts historical melodrama: as Booker is planning his escape, Harriet Tubman materializes to guide his family to freedom, and when Amethyst fights her own "good fight" for civil rights nearly a century later, an adolescent Martin Luther King Jr. shows up at a local rally and solemnly announces, "This is my calling." Stokes orchestrates some touching moments, and Amethyst is a likable (though unrealistically pious) protagonist, but the excess of sentiment makes for a predictable denouement. (May)

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13yo ds   10yo dd  8yo ds and 6yo ds and 1yo ds  
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#133 of 222 Old 01-14-2005, 08:48 PM
 
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#4 Chalktown by Melinda Haynes
I checked this out because it is set in the county in which I am living, and because I enjoyed her first novel (Mother of Pearl).
This author is trying to write literary southern fiction, ala Eudora Welty, but she tries too hard. Her language is not natural and this book was slow. It also had 2 murders, and that really isn't my thing. I had to struggle hard to finish this, and I am glad it is over. I don't recommend this one.
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#134 of 222 Old 01-14-2005, 11:43 PM
 
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#3 Candyfreak: A Journey Through the Chocolate Underbelly of America
by Steve Almond
I liked this book a lot -- heard the author speaking about it on NPR last year. He loves candy, and writes a whole book about it, including visits to the few small independent candymakers still in existence. Esp. good if you lived through the 70s and Bubble Yum and Pop Rocks -- but that's just a small part of the book. Funny and poignant, too, if you can believe it.
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#135 of 222 Old 01-15-2005, 12:28 AM
 
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Just finished #4, The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri.

This is what Powell's says about it:
Jhumpa Lahiri's Interpreter of Maladies established this young writer as one the most brilliant of her generation. Her stories are one of the very few debut works -- and only a handful of collections -- to have won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Among the many other awards and honors it received were the New Yorker Debut of the Year award, the PEN/Hemingway Award, and the highest critical praise for its grace, acuity, and compassion in detailing lives transported from India to America.

In The Namesake, Lahiri enriches the themes that made her collection an international bestseller: the immigrant experience, the clash of cultures, the conflicts of assimilation, and, most poignantly, the tangled ties between generations. Here again Lahiri displays her deft touch for the perfect detail -- the fleeting moment, the turn of phrase -- that opens whole worlds of emotion.

The Namesake takes the Ganguli family from their tradition-bound life in Calcutta through their fraught transformation into Americans. On the heels of their arranged wedding, Ashoke and Ashima Ganguli settle together in Cambridge, Massachusetts. An engineer by training, Ashoke adapts far less warily than his wife, who resists all things American and pines for her family. When their son is born, the task of naming him betrays the vexed results of bringing old ways to the new world. Named for a Russian writer by his Indian parents in memory of a catastrophe years before, Gogol Ganguli knows only that he suffers the burden of his heritage as well as his odd, antic name.

Lahiri brings great empathy to Gogol as he stumbles along the first-generation path, strewn with conflicting loyalties, comic detours, and wrenchinglove affairs. With penetrating insight, she reveals not only the defining power of the names and expectations bestowed upon us by our parents, but also the means by which we slowly, sometimes painfully, come to define ourselves.

The New York Times has praised Lahiri as a writer of uncommon elegance and poise. The Namesake is a fine-tuned, intimate, and deeply felt novel of identity.


I really love good fiction with an international feel to it. I especially like stories about immigrating. (hence teaching English as a Second Language for several years). Lahiri's first book Interpreter of Maladies blew me away. I don't generally like short stories and loved it. I think I may have had my hopes up a bit too high for this book, though I liked it very much. I think she excels at the short story; I felt like the novel dragged a little near the end. However, Lahiri writes beautifully; some lines are positively poetic. I am already looking forward to anything else by her.

Now, I just want to take this time to HIGHLY RECOMMEND a book I read just before the New Year, after Christmas, so technically it doesn't count. But it was too good of a book to not tell you about it. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini is one of the best books I've ever read. Not many books are able to pull so many emotions from me, but this one had me crying, laughing and my heart breaking over and over. It's truly a great story. It is also truly fascinating to read a story that begins in pre-war Afghanistan and takes you through the Russian occupation to the current political situation. Stunning, beautiful and timely.

Briefly, from Powell's: "The unforgettable, heartbreaking story of the unlikely friendship between a wealthy boy and the son of his father's servant, The Kite Runner is a beautifully crafted novel set in a country that is in the process of being destroyed. It is about the power of reading, the price of betrayal, and the possibility of redemption, and it is also about the power of fathers over sons-their love, their sacrifices, their lies."

If you read one book this year, read The Kite Runner.

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#136 of 222 Old 01-15-2005, 12:44 AM
 
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#3 Bridget Jones The Edge of Reason by Helen Fielding

From the Publisher
Bridget is back! The self-disciplined, glacially poised & definitely non-smoking Bridget has returned with another year's worth of unflinching self-analysis, iron willpower & absolutely no chardonnay at all (well, almost). This time she find herself lurching through a morass of self-help books & mad advice from best friends Jude & Shazzer, struggling with boyfriend-nabbing ex-friend with thighs like a baby giraffe, & discovering the inadvisability of sending out Christmas cards after a little too much holiday cheer.


I figured I would read part 2 of Bridget Jones since I just read the first one. Light, funny, easy read
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#137 of 222 Old 01-15-2005, 02:04 PM
 
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Book #4- Artemis Fowl: The Eternity Code by Eoin Colfer- yeah, I know, another YA book. Just happened to come available on my list of books from the library, and I could finish it in time to get it back w/o renewing. I am still working on The Shadow Divers but knew I would have to renew that, so I finished Artemis first.

Here is the blurb (from Amazon (EDITED by me because it tells too much!)
"Ever the resourceful young criminal mastermind, Artemis has found a way to construct a supercomputer from stolen fairy technology. Called the "C Cube," it will render all existing human technology obsolete. Artemis then arranges a meeting with a Chicago businessman, Jon Spiro, to offer to suppress the Cube for one year in return for gold, his favorite substance...Spiro steals the Cube and mortally injures Butler. Artemis knows his only hope to save Butler lies in fairy magic...Butler's infamously ditzy sister, Juliet, is called in as Artemis's bodyguard. Together, they travel to Chicago to steal back the Cube and ensure that Jon Spiro is put out of business-permanently."


I have to be honest and say that I don't LOVE the Artemis books, but they are quick and cute and I am the kind of person who has to read ALL the books if I have read one of them. This was a very fast read (2-3 hours tops) and picked up shortly after Book 2- the Arctic Incident. The characters continue to develop, which is really nice for a kids book. Not bad for a quick read.

1) Daughter of God
2) The Lovely Bones
3) The Shattering
4) Artemis Fowl: The Eternity Code
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#138 of 222 Old 01-15-2005, 04:55 PM
 
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I really liked The Namesake. I tend to get my book recommendations from things like Entertainment Weekly, and that was one of their top ten for the year.
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#139 of 222 Old 01-15-2005, 06:59 PM
 
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#2 Friday Night Lights
I really liked this, and I'm not a football fan. Real life is just so fascinating and unpredictable! It got a little slow in the middle, but still well worth it. Excellent writing.


From Amazon:
The classic, best-selling story of life in the football-driven town of Odessa, Texas, with a new afterword that looks at the players and the town ten years later.

Return once again to the timeless account of the Permian Panthers of Odessa--the winningest high-school football team in Texas history. Odessa is not known to be a town big on dreams, but the Panthers help keep the hopes and dreams of this small, dusty town going. Socially and racially divided, its fragile economy follows the treacherous boom-bust path of the oil business. In bad times, the unemployment rate barrels out of control; in good times, its murder rate skyrockets. But every Friday night from September to December, when the Permian High School Panthers play football, this West Texas town becomes a place where dreams can come true. With frankness and compassion, H.G. Bissinger chronicles a season in the life of Odessa and shows how single-minded devotion to the team shapes the community and inspires--and sometimes shatters--the teenagers who wear the Panthers' uniforms.

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#140 of 222 Old 01-15-2005, 09:46 PM
 
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I loved both Namesake and Kite Runner too.

#8 Man and Wife. Description was already posted above. I actually didn't like it as well as the first book - but I think mostly because the story was so similar to the first and after a while the selfishness and shallowness of the main character started to get on my nerves. Also, he keeps talking about how loveable and wonderful his son was but this book didn't show him like that at all. In fact, it didn't really give you much of any of the characters to really like.

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#141 of 222 Old 01-15-2005, 11:16 PM
 
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#1 (sigh that I'm not further along) Blessings by Anna Quindlen. I was in need of a good read with a tired baby at the library, so I picked this up, knowing that I love Anna Quindlen. It was a good read. Brought back memories of newborn days with my son.

"From Amazon: Blessings, the bestselling novel by the author of Black and Blue, One True Thing, Object Lessons, and A Short Guide to a Happy Life, begins when, late at night, a teenage couple drives up to the estate owned by Lydia Blessing and leaves a box.

In this instant, the world of the estate called Blessings is changed forever. The story of Skip Cuddy, the Blessings caretaker, who finds a baby asleep in that box and decides he wants to keep her, and of matriarch Lydia Blessing, who, for her own reasons, decides to help him, Blessings explores how the secrets of the past affect decisions and lives in the present; what makes a person, a life, legitimate or illegitimate, and who decides; the unique resources people find in themselves and in a community. This is a powerful novel of love, redemption, and personal change by the Pulitzer Prize–winning writer about whom The Washington Post Book World said, “Quindlen knows that all the things we ever will be can be found in some forgotten fragment of family."
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#142 of 222 Old 01-16-2005, 01:00 AM
 
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#2, by Frank Huyler, The Laws of Invisible Things

The amazon description:
Not long into Michael Grant’s first year in his new practice, a young girl in his care unexpectedly dies. He might not have been able to change that outcome, but he didn’t do all in his power to prevent it, either. So when Michael is asked to take on the dead girl’s father as a patient, he feels he must oblige the family’s wishes. Examining the man, Michael notices an unusual pattern—a white, serpentine spiral—on the back of the throat and in his eye. But before a diagnosis can be made, the man is dead, the victim of a mysterious fire, and soon Michael himself is experiencing symptoms of the strange illness.

Believing that he has stumbled across a new disease but unable to convince his skeptical colleagues, Michael sets out to gather evidence. His quest takes him into a wilderness of disease, religion, and mystery, and becomes a journey that leads him to question not only his belief in the order of the world but his own place and purpose within it.

Lyrical, poetic, and utterly engrossing, The Laws of Invisible Things fully delivers on the promise of Frank Huyler’s critically acclaimed collection of medical stories, The Blood of Strangers.


The book is beautifully written, and compels you to the end. I was a bit disappointed with the ending (or lack thereof); but overall pretty good.
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#143 of 222 Old 01-16-2005, 10:09 AM
 
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#2- How to get your baby to sleep ( A parenting.com FAQ book) by William Sears M.D., and Martha Sears,R.N.

#3- Get Crafty,Hip Home Ec by Jean Railla
Synopsis from Powells:
" "Get Crafty" puts a savvy new spin on the homey arts. Writing in the smart tone that has made her Web site so popular, crafty lady Jean Railla helps readers rediscover the satisfaction of making things by hand and making reative choices throughout life. "

I've been a memeber of her website for 4 or so years and it was nice to read her book. I enjoyed it. It has craft projects, quizes and recipes in it.

Too bad I can't include my magazine count here...haha...I think I've read at least 7 magazine's, cover to cover, already this month.

winner.jpg  homeschool.gif familybed1.gif    happily married mom to one son jammin.gif and one daughterbiggrinbounce.gif!
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#144 of 222 Old 01-16-2005, 12:06 PM
 
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#3 Hans Brinker or The Silver Skates by Mary Mapes Dodge. I had read this when I was about 9yo; I just read all 318 pages aloud to my kids. The language is as complex as many adult books. I had forgotten how mind-numbingly boring the middle of it is (the part where Ben, et al, take a skating trip to Amsterdam, and Mary Mapes Dodge flips into travelogue mode). The race is exciting, though. And the coincidences that move the plot along are no dumber than, say, The DaVinci Code. Dame Brinker spins and knits a lot, and everyone keeps their house excruciatingly clean -- funny how these things pop out at me now (I love to knit, hate to clean).

#4 The Knitter's Handy Book of Sweater Patterns by Ann Buld. I was wandering through JoAnn's with a 50% off coupon when I found this on the shelf -- it was the highlight of my weekend. From the back cover:

" The six most popular sweater constructions (drop shoulder, modified drop shoulder, set-in sleeve, saddle shoulder, raglan, and seamless yoke) are presented with easy-to-follow, charted instructions. Each style comes in fifteen sizes (from 26" to 54" chest circumference) and in five guages. If you're counting, that's 450 patterns. And if you add the cardigan and neckline variations, edgings, waist shapings, and color and stitch patterns, you've got more that 1,500 design options!"

This is just the right amount of help for me to design sweaters for my family, especially my highly opinionated dds. I've already started desgining a jacket for myself.
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#145 of 222 Old 01-16-2005, 12:47 PM
 
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#4 Moon Over Water by Debbie Macomber

From Amazon.com
Setting: Yucatan coast, present day

Sensuality rating: 4-5

An Affair to Remember collides with Romancing the Stone in bestselling author Debbie MacOmber's Moon Over Water.. Lorraine Dancy and Jack Keller have little in common, but that doesn't stop their romance from blossoming under the scorching Yucatan sun. Framed for the theft of an ancient artifact and pursued by the police, a drug dealer nursing a grudge, and a crazed archeologist, Lorraine finds herself thrust into the questionable company of Jack Keller, retired mercenary. Jack's task is to get Lorraine safely back to the United States--all the while avoiding border patrols--but Lorraine keeps landing in trouble, right up to her pretty neck! Will the seemingly star-crossed lovers make it out of the jungle alive? And if they do, will they have the courage to live their dream and let love grow where it is meant to be--in each other's arms? Find out in this fast-paced and unpredictable contemporary that will delight loyal fans and make converts out of new readers. --Alison Trinkle


I had to laugh when I copied the Amazon review and saw that this book had a sensuality rating ( I wonder what it goes up to)

A friend passed this book on to me, another fun easy read.
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#146 of 222 Old 01-16-2005, 02:06 PM
 
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I *finally* finished my first book of the year last night, sigh.... : I can't believe it took soooo long.


#1 Present Tense: The Janus Gate Book One of Three (Star Trek The Original Series) By L.A. Graf

The crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise™ is exploring the seemingly peaceful and uninhabited world of M-3107 when a bizarre and inexplicable transporter accident causes both Captain Kirk and Dr. McCoy to vanish completely. Transporter records suggest that the two men were transported somewhere, but their ultimate destination remains a mystery.

Now in command of the Enterprise, Spock dispatches a search-and -rescue team -- consisting of Security Chief Giotto, Transporter Technician John Kyle, and Chief Helmsman Hikaru Sulu -- on an urgent mission to recover the missing officers.

But then the rescue team disappears as well!
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#147 of 222 Old 01-16-2005, 02:39 PM
 
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Allrighty, I'm done with my second book.
#2 Mother Night by Kurt Vonnegut Jr.
From the back of the book:
In Mother Night Vonnegut makes fun of sex, sin, and motherhood; of war and peace, of the FBI and Communists; and the Nazis, too. And no one but Vonnegut could have created Howard Campbell, Jr., the American who became a notorious Nazi and survived the war to mock all decent people. This atrocious man a hero? This insatiable fiend (who boasted of knowing more than 49 ways to make love) really nothing more than a happy Rotarian? It could only happen in the Silly Putty world of Mother Night where the only reality is unreality.

I don't think the blurb really does the book justice, I think it's a great read. Want to write more but I've got dd hanging on me, but this book is recommended

Mama to 3:
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#148 of 222 Old 01-16-2005, 08:14 PM
 
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#9 The Au Pairs by Melissa de la Cruz

A light, fun read about 3 girls from different backgrounds/classes that au pair for the summer for a rich family in the Hamptons - and of course they all grown and learn from the experience.

#10 Small Wonder by Barbara Kingsolver

Pretty much the opposite of the above book - this is a collection of essays about everything from foreign policy, 9/11, genetically engineered food, the homeless, etc. I've been reading it for several months because I find I can only read one or two essays at a sitting. Very good, thought provoking stuff.

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
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#149 of 222 Old 01-16-2005, 11:43 PM
 
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Ohhh...I've always wanted to read that one, but never seemed to get around to it!

I'll see if I can find it at Half Price!

Wife, Mom, Health Services Researcher
Uno ('03) Dos ('08) and Tres (Aug '10)
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#150 of 222 Old 01-17-2005, 12:24 AM
 
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Cathe - I checked out Small Wonder from the library to read. I didn't finish it before I had to return it. I liked the few essays I read, especially one in the beginning about Grace, I think. Is that right? Did you enjoy all of them? Maybe I'll recheck it. I'm in between again. That means junk reading: mags (some good) newspapers, catalogs, blahblahblah.

I went to the bookstore today, but then couldn't decide so I left empty-handed. I really wanted to buy Reading Lolita in Tehran, but two people have told me they didn't like it that much. Anyone here like it? I need to go to the library where I don't have to decide; I can just bring them all home.

Homeschool Planet http://planethomeschool.net
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