Book Challenge 2005: January - Page 8 - Mothering Forums
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#211 of 222 Old 01-30-2005, 10:13 PM - Thread Starter
 
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#90

From Here to Maternity: A Novel of Total Exhaustion
by Kris Webb and Kathy Wilson

I thought this book was cute, but really nothing like real motherhood, IMO. I never had a problem finding the time for a 5 minute shower. It was good for a few good laughs

Amazon review:

All the elements of the typical chick lit novel are present in this sisterly debut. Hapless Everygal Sophie lives in Sydney with her beautiful and quirky best friend, Debbie. Both slave away at jobs they'd rather not reveal to potential boyfriends. The comic drama ensues when Sophie discovers she's pregnant, and Max, the "Y chromosome in question," has moved to San Francisco. Deciding to keep the baby, Sophie drags Debbie to her obstetrician appointments (where Debbie drools over Sophie's doctor) and accepts advice from a gaggle of friends she meets every weekend for coffee. The expected new single-mother conundrums arise as Sophie tries to keep a job and a baby-sitter and also balance a new business venture and boyfriend. Then Max reenters Sophie and baby Sarah's lives, further complicating matters. This novel goes down as easily as a spoonful of ice cream, with as much substance. The plot zips along breezily, the characters are likable, the dialogue funny. Buy where appetite for this literary trend is insatiable

We may not have it all together, but together we have it all
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#212 of 222 Old 01-31-2005, 09:13 AM
 
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#7 I, Juan de Pareja by Elizabeth Borton de Trevino. Historical fiction about the 17th century Spanish painter Velazquez and his slave Juan de Pareja. From the book flap:

"Through Juan's eyes the reader sees Velaquez's delightful family, his working habits and the character of the man, his relation with the shy yet devoted King Philip IV and with his fellow painters, Rubens and Murillo, the climate and customs of Spanish court life. When Velazquez discovers he and Juan share a love for the art which is his very life, the painter proves his friendship in the most incredible fashion, for in those days it was forbidden by law for slaves to learn or practice the arts...."

It was an extremely well-written, fascinating book. I read it slowly (it's only 180 pages), and got much more out of it by lingering.

#8 Eat Fat, Lose Fat by Mary Enig and Sally Fallon. Uses coconut oil and traditional, nutrient-dense foods as a way to lose weight, regain health, or simply enjoy food more. Lots of health info, much of it repeated from Nourishing Traditions. However, this book is laid out much, much better (not saying much, since the layout of NT stinks, imho). All the nutritional info is in the front, then some coconut based recipes, followed by a few "greatest hits" from NT. Includes menu plans. In the back is a resources guide which tells which brands of stuff to buy, and where to find them; this speeds up shopping trips immensely if your knowledge of some of this stuff like, say, fish eggs is pretty miniscule, since you can just grab the brand/item they suggest and not stand there trying to figure out which is best.

Dh was shocked I got this book, given that I don't need to lose weight. Really, though, it functions as a sort of Nourishing Traditions for Dummies, but with a coconut theme. I am finally "doing" NT. Watch out, world, I'm getting so healthy and energetic there's no telling what I'll accomplish.
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#213 of 222 Old 01-31-2005, 11:22 AM
 
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#1 The Teenage Liberation Handbook, by Grace Llewellyn.

This book was incredibly empowering and inspirational. It made me angry about my school days and at society's lack of knowledge about educational opportunities and "dropping out." At the same time, I'm still learning everyday, and this book is an incredible resource with a huge list of interesting books to read.

#2 Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, by Gregory Maguire - I've been interested in this book for years, and now that I finally bought it, I'm annoyed that I spent money on it. While I like the concept of hearing well-known stories from another perspective, I didn't like the result of this one. The jumping ahead in time frustrated me, because once I started to get into the story and get to know the characters, we'd speed ahead a few years and I'd have to learn all about everyone again. There were some philosophical discussions, but they didn't draw me in or get me thinking; I felt like the book was trying too hard to be symbolic or meaningful. Maybe I just didn't get it. It did stick with me, though, and I will never look at the Wizard of Oz the same way again, now that I "know" all the background info.
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#214 of 222 Old 01-31-2005, 11:57 AM
 
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"How to Raise a Healthy Child in Spite of Your Doctor" by Robert Mendelsohn

from Amazon:
Dr. Robert Mendelsohn, renowned pediatrician and author advises parents on home treatment and diagnosis of colds and flus, childhood illnesses, vision and hearing problems, allergies, and more. PLUS, a complete section on picking the right doctor for your child, step-by-step instructions for knowing when to call a doctor, and much more.

*****
I'm still working on "Daughter of God", I'm really enjoying it! Hopefully I'll finish it soon, it's overdue. :

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#215 of 222 Old 01-31-2005, 12:07 PM
 
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#19 Shadow Game by Christine Feehan

I did not like this one as much as I hoped, out well. Will try the sequel anyway.

From Publishers Weekly
Having fast made a name for herself in the vampire romance realm, Feehan (Dark Symphony, etc.) now turns her attention to other supernatural powers in this swift, sensational offering. When Lily Whitney's adopted father asks her to act as consultant on a project involving the development of advanced psychic powers, she is stunned to learn that he is experimenting on men from an elite military squadron. The men, lead by Capt. Ryland ******, are separated and caged like lab rats in an underground facility where they have learned to communicate with each other telepathically, a talent Lily has had since birth. In true romance form, Lily and Ryland share an instant attraction, which leads to a few intriguing sexual liaisons (such as the sequence where Ryland enters Lily's dream). After Lily's father is murdered, she discovers that he harbored some despicable secrets, but that doesn't stop her from searching for his killer. At times it's difficult to overlook the story's improbabilities (e.g., Lily can move objects, but when in danger, she can't help herself) and Feehan's overly dramatic prose ("Small bolts of lightening whipped in his bloodstream"; "Tongues of fire raced along her skin"); however, this is still the sultry, spine-tingling kind of read that her fans will adore.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

#20 Death Comes As Epiphany by Sharan Newman


LOVED it. I have a new mystery series to track down (and buy for rereads in the future). Already start the next one. I am a history buff and was impressed by the depth of this book as well as the mystery.

A medievalist breathes life and vigor into the scholastic debates and religious controversies of 12th-century France in this entrancing mystery debut. Catherine LeVendeur, a young novice and scholar at the Convent of the Paraclete, is sent by the Abbess Heloise on a perilous mission to find out who is trying to destroy the reputation of the convent and, through it, that of the abbess's onetime lover and patron, theologian Peter Abelard. A psalter created at the convent and given as a gift to the powerful abbot Suger of Saint-Denis is later rumored to contain heretical statements in its accompanying commentaries. Catherine, in the role of a disgraced novice, must find the book and copy the disputed passages to determine if they are forgeries. Further complicating her search, Saint-Denis's master stonemason, Garnulf, is murdered, a crime which may be tied to the sinister hermit Aleran and the rebuilding of the splendid Abbey of Saint-Denis. Re-entering worldly life, the young novice must face both her sometimes disapproving family and her attraction to Garnulf's mysterious apprentice, Edgar. Newman skillfully depicts historical figures and issues in a very different age, one in which piety and great beauty coexist with cruelty.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.

On a side note. I am very bummed because Einstein Never Used Flashcards by Roberta Michnick Golinkoff is not available through my local or state-wide library systems. I am going to have to buy it if I want to read, which I do.

My family of 3 (plus pup) Indigo (Aimee), Rob (dp), Ryne (ds) & Phebe (dog), plus my BIL's family of 3.

 
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#216 of 222 Old 01-31-2005, 01:53 PM
 
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#10 Early Leaving by Judy Goldman

Second-wave feminism seems to have bypassed Kathryne Smallwood. Despite working as a film critic, her life revolves around her son, Early, and her husband, Peter. To outsiders looking in, the Smallwoods appear the epitome of white, upper-class privilege, complete with a huge house, black maid, multiple cars, and the latest gadgets. But—surprise!—things are not as rosy as they seem. In her second novel (after The Slow Way Back), Goldman offers an inside look at the consequences of parental indulgence. Multiple themes emerge: the limits of liberalism in combating racism, the ways we avoid conflict and minimize differences, and how we balance the impulse to protect our kids with the need to teach them to act responsibly. Ultimately, Kathryne—think Pollyanna in Stepford, CT—represents the failure to live an autonomous life.
*********************
I thought this was VERY well written, and couldn't put it down (actually read it cover to cover--in between my motherly duties--yesterday since hubby was out of state)
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#217 of 222 Old 01-31-2005, 02:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayayenay

#2 Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, by Gregory Maguire - I've been interested in this book for years, and now that I finally bought it, I'm annoyed that I spent money on it. While I like the concept of hearing well-known stories from another perspective, I didn't like the result of this one.

I loved this book. If you are still willing to try a Maguire novel, and since you are interested in another-perspective-on-an-old-tale stories, you might like Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister better.


Happy reading,
AM
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#218 of 222 Old 01-31-2005, 07:52 PM
 
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#10- No Eye Can See by Jane Kirkpatrick I stayed up until 12:30 last night to finish this book. I'm really getting into her historical fiction stuff now.

From Publishers Weekly
Christian novelist Kirkpatrick follows her well-received All Together in One Place with this rich and engaging sequel that could easily stand alone. She picks up the story of 11 women who have banded together to travel west on the Oregon Trail after losing their menfolk. Kirkpatrick's gifts as a writer are most evident in the surprising complexity of her female characters and in her ability to weave historical details into her story without overwhelming it. The fascinating moments of daily routine on the trail and in California's mining towns fit effortlessly with the plot and include the varying experiences of different races (Chinese and Indian) as well as of men and women. The author brings her heroines alive with full complements of both endearing and frustrating qualities, keeping them on even footing with each other and leaving the reader unsure what they might do next. Kirkpatrick is convincingly insightful about the conflicting emotions these women experience during dramatic life changes, allowing them to struggle, change their minds, make mistakes and start over on different tracks. The novel's chief flaw is that the male characters are far less developed, especially the villainous Zane Randolph. He provides a gripping, driving tension to the novel, but he is too one-dimensionally evil. Even so, this second installment in the Kinship and Courage trilogy satisfies overall as entertainment, as historical fiction and as a thoughtful exploration of human character and community.

Midwife (CPM, LDM) and homeschooling mama to:
14yo ds   11yo dd  9yo ds and 7yo ds and 2yo ds  
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#219 of 222 Old 01-31-2005, 07:57 PM
 
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6. Notes from a Small Island by Bill Bryson

A funny travelogue of Britain. Good fun if you've been there and love England.

7. Plain & Happy Living: Amish Recipes and Remedies by Emma Byler

Pretty self-explanatory. I skimmed this -- it had the feel of a self-published book, although I doubt that!

8. O Pioneers! by Willa Cather.

Read it for my book club. It was really good and worth reading.

From Amazon:

O Pioneers! (1913) was Willa Cather's first great novel, and to many it remains her unchallenged masterpiece. No other work of fiction so faithfully conveys both the sharp physical realities and the mythic sweep of the transformation of the American frontier -- and the transformation of the people who settled it. Cather's heroine is Alexandra Bergson, who arrives on the wind-blasted prairie of Hanover, Nebraska, as a girl and grows up to make it a prosperous farm. But this archetypal success story is darkened by loss, and Alexandra's devotion to the land may come at the cost of love itself.
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#220 of 222 Old 02-01-2005, 12:00 AM
 
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"Daughter of God" by Lewis Perdue

from Amazon:
When Zoe Ridgeway, a prominent art broker, visits Switzerland with her husband Seth, she expects to purchase the rich estate of a secretive art collector. But before Zoe can complete the transaction, she and Seth are drawn into a thousand-year-old web of conspiracy, murder and intrigue that begins and ends with the mystery of a female Messiah, a young girl whose existence, if proven, would explode the very foundation of Western culture.

*****
I saw this listed by someone else on this thread who read it and I thought it looked interesting. Now I'm moving on to another fluff read!

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#221 of 222 Old 02-01-2005, 03:20 AM
 
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Gonna get one in here before our February thread
#4 for me
Waiting for the Barbarians by J.M. Coetzee

From the back of the book:
For decades the Magistrate has been a loyal servent of th Empire, running the affairs of a tiny frontier settlement and ignoring the impending war with the barbarians. When interrogation experts arrive, however, he witnesses the Empier's cruel and unjust treatment of prisoners of war. Jolted into sympathy for their victims, he commints a quixoitic acto f rebellion that brands him an enemy of the state.
J.M. Coetzee's prize-winning novel is a startling allegory of the war between opppressor and oppressed. The Magistrate is not simply a man living through a crisis of conscience in an obscure plane in remote times; his situation is that of all men living in unbearable complicity with regimes that ignore justice an decency.

Hmmmm, sound familiar? A great read, for the times especially. Not for the faint of heart.

Mama to 3:
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#222 of 222 Old 02-01-2005, 07:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Ok everyone off to my new thread for February!!! Thanks for participating in this. I have loved all of your ideas!

We may not have it all together, but together we have it all
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