Book Challenge 2005: February - Page 7 - Mothering Forums

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Old 02-26-2005, 05:16 PM
 
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#31 Emotionally Weird by Kate Atkinson (author of Behind the Scenes at the Musuem)

Well - this was definitely a weird book - it took me a long time to get into it but I stuck with it for two reasons - one is that I actually bought this book and didn't want to have wasted my money and two is that the writing was quite funny with some actually laugh out loud lines. The story however did not draw me in at first - there were a lot of characters and it was hard to keep them straight. About halfway through it got better and I could follow the story - and like I said, there were a lot of funny lines. The ending was a little disappointing - everything wrapped up in bows for the reader.

Anyway - I guess I should say what the book is about - A daughter and mother take a trip together and the daughter tells mother about what has been happening to her - though you are never sure if it is the truth or if she is making it up. Then the mother drops a few bombshells on the daughter.

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
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Old 02-26-2005, 05:33 PM
 
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#27 Peter and the Starcatchers by Dave Barry & Ridley Pearson

Very cool book. A twist on the story of Peter Pan. Since I have a semi-obsession with Alternative History this was right up my alley.

***

Don't even think of starting this book unless you're sitting in a comfortable chair and have lots of time. A fast-paced, impossible-to-put-down adventure awaits as the young orphan Peter and his mates are dispatched to an island ruled by the evil King Zarboff. They set sail aboard the Never Land, a ship carrying a precious and mysterious trunk in its cargo hold-and the journey quickly becomes fraught with excitement and danger. Discover richly developed characters in the sweet but sophisticated Molly, the scary but familiar Black Stache, and the fearless Peter. Treacherous battles with pirates, foreboding thunderstorms at sea, and evocative writing immerse the reader in a story that slowly and finally reveals the secrets and mysteries of the beloved Peter Pan.

#28 At Grandmother's Table: Women Write About Food, Life, and the Enduring Bond Between Grandmothers and Granddaughters by Ellen Perry Berkeley & Simi Berman

Mentioned before... Thinking about buying it for the recipes.
I've started to look for books on cooking science since I love reading about food.

***

A wonderful book about grandmothers and the memories evoked by family meals. More than 70 women share their grandmothers' touching life stories and favorite recipes. Their essays show us why our grandmother's "comfort food" is indeed so comforting: it connects not only with her spirit, but also with the lives of our mothers, sisters, cousins, and daughters. A wonderful look at family culinary history and the fascinating stories of women whose collective lives span three centuries.

#29 Ready, Set, Knit: Learn To Knit With 20 Hot Projects by Sasha Kagan

I picked this up after a meetup in Borders because it actually had continental knitting instructions. Thanks to this book and http://www.knittinghelp.com I finally "got" knitting and am planning my first and second projects. Very cool book, couple projects I'd consider doing and it stands up so you don't have balance it in your lap.

***

The knitting craze continues, and new knitters take up the needles all the time. Ready, Set, Knit gives beginners everything they'll ever need to know plus fun, fresh, fast-to-finish projects. Each project introduces a new skill, so the book can be used as a complete course in learning to knit. The projects are the big draw-the quick and creative accessories that knitters crave. The book's unique format stands up, putting the open page at eye level so learners can easily refer to the how-to photos and patterns. The book then closes securely with a Velcro flap so it can pop in a bag and go along wherever they like to hang out and knit.

My family of 3 (plus pup) Indigo (Aimee), Rob (dp), Ryne (ds) & Phebe (dog), plus my BIL's family of 3.

 
"The best way to predict the future is to invent it." - Alan Kay

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Old 02-26-2005, 06:50 PM
 
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"Midnight Embrace" by Amanda Ashley

Another vampire romance from the bag of books given to me by a friend. A complete waste of ink, I can feel my brain rotting.

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Old 02-26-2005, 07:24 PM
 
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#16 Skinny Dip by Carl Hiaasen

I have been waiting to read this book for awhile, I saw it on a fun summer reading list and by the time I got around to checking for it at my library, there was quite the wait list. It was well worth the wait though, it kept me entertained for the 24 hours it took me to read it

From Amazon,
Hiaasen's signature mix of hilariously over-the-top villains, lovable innocents and righteous indignation at what mankind has done to his beloved Florida wilderness is all present in riotous abundance in his latest. It begins with attractive heiress Joey Perrone being tossed overboard from a cruise ship by her larcenous husband, Chaz—not for her money, which she has had the good sense to keep well away from him, but because he fears she is onto his crooked dealings with a ruthless tycoon who is poisoning the Everglades. But instead of drowning as she's supposed to, Joey stays afloat until she is rescued by moody ex-cop Mick Stranahan, a loner who has also struck out in the marriage department. Then the two together, with the unwitting aid of a suspicious cop who can't pin the attempted murder on Chaz, hatch a sadistic plot to scare that "maggot" out of what little wit he has. Even Tool, a hulking brute sent by the tycoon to keep an eye on Chaz, eventually turns against him, and much of the fun is in watching the deplorable Chaz flounder further and further in the murk, both literally and figuratively (Chaz's job, as the world's unlikeliest marine biologist, involves falsifying water pollution levels for the tycoon). Hiaasen's books are so enjoyable it's always a sad moment when they end. In this case, however, sadness is mixed with puzzlement because the book seems to end in mid-scene, with Chaz in trouble again—but is it terminal? We thought at first there were some pages missing, but Knopf says that was the ending Hiaasen intended. Odd.
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Old 02-26-2005, 07:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyBug & BabyBug
"Midnight Embrace" by Amanda Ashley

Another vampire romance from the bag of books given to me by a friend. A complete waste of ink, I can feel my brain rotting.
: : I have read books that have left me feeling like that too!
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Old 02-26-2005, 10:25 PM
 
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Oh, Astrid, I get such a kick out of Carl Hiaasen's books. I'll look for that one.

#13 Path of Discovery, vol. 3, 3rd grade by Eric Fairman. Journal of an Australian Waldorf teacher as he works through each year with a class. I did not like vol.1, 1st grade -- I couldn't find much to apply to our homeschool situation. I totally skipped vol 2, 2nd grade. This vol. was pretty good -- lots I could use at home. Or, maybe I'm just getting better at figuring out how to apply this stuff to homeschooling.
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Old 02-26-2005, 10:53 PM
 
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This is the latest in the endless line of Kinsey Millhone mysteries. Right after I started reading it, I somehow managed to flip the book open toward the end. My eye caught just one line: "XXX was convicted..." So I spent most of the book knowing who did it! I didn't love it, but it was easy to read. Definitely junk food for me!
-Erin

Momma to 8 y.o. DS and 5 y.o. DD. Married to a Maker!

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Old 02-26-2005, 11:15 PM
 
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#9 The Time Traveler's Wife Awesome. Loved it. Wish I owned it. It was a really fun book to read. I laughed. I cried. I had a good time reading it. Jumping around from time period to time period was like playing at a mental playground. Baby needs me so I won't say more. It's been reviewed this month, I think. I recommend it.

Off to read the Dog in the Nighttime book.

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Old 02-27-2005, 03:36 AM
 
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[QUOTE=Queen Gwen]Oh, Astrid, I get such a kick out of Carl Hiaasen's books. I'll look for that one.
/QUOTE]
I had never heard of him before this book and he has written ten books! I can't wait to read them!
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Old 02-27-2005, 11:52 AM
 
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#24 The Lost Mother: A Novel by Mary McGarry Morris

Quote:
Since the publication of her astonishing debut, Vanished, Mary McGarry Morris has been compared with John Steinbeck and Carson McCullers and widely praised as "a superb storyteller" (The Washington Post) and "one of our finest American writers" (The Miami Herald). Now, in her sixth novel, Morris has achieved new heights with her riveting chronicle of the Talcotts, a family in rural Vermont during the Great Depression.
Abandoned by his beautiful wife, Irene, Henry and their two young children, Thomas and Margaret, spend that summer in a tent on the edge of Black Pond. Henry, an itinerant butcher, struggles to provide for them, but often must leave them alone as he travels the county in search of work. And while Henry loves his children deeply, he is devastated by their mother’s desertion. He has not told them why she left or if she’ll return. When Mrs. Phyllis Farley, a prosperous neighbor, begins to woo the children as companions for her strange, housebound son, Henry must weigh an unusual proposition, the consequences of which may cost him everything. Powerfully imagined and intensely felt, The Lost Mother is a haunting masterwork and McGarry Morris’s strongest novel to date.
Wow! Wow! Wow! I always have loved her writing, but this one was one I couldn't put down (read the whole thing last night). It made me feel for the children in this book, but I give it
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Old 02-27-2005, 03:15 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Bergdorf Blondes by Plum Sykes

This makes #91 for me and I DID read this before and forgot to add it to my list so does that count as 2 books?:LOL Seriously I thought I had read it and I checked my list twice to see if it was on there and it wasn't and I MADE myself read it again. I will say this it was cuter the first time around!


Here is what amazon had to say:
They're ravenous. They're ruthless. They live in a strictly hierarchical, alpha-dog, eat-or-be-eaten world. No, it's not a rerun of Wild America; it's the world of dressed-to-the-nines Park Avenue heiresses, aka Bergdorf Blondes, botoxed to within an inch of their barely-into-the-third-decade lives. Our unnamed London-born heroine is New York's favorite "champagne-bubble-about-town" and just as effervescent and exhilarating as a fine bottle of Dom Perignon. Blissfully self-interested and flush with the cheeriness that comes from being, well, flush, Miss Disposable Income 2004 sashays her way through New York society in search of the perfect P.H. (Potential Husband)-"Have you any idea how awesome your skin looks if you are engaged?"-and the perfect butt-shaping pair of Chloe jeans. Despair occasionally strikes when her latest prince turns into yet another toad, but it's nothing an invitation to an uber-exclusive Hermes sale and a gallon or so of Bellinis can't fix. She's got the crème de la crème along with her for the ride, including her best friend, the fabulously wealthy heiress Julie Bergdorf, who is tres supportive of her nervous breakdown=You'll be able to dine out on how crazy you went in Paris for months-and a posse of chattering, Harry Winston-bedecked clones with whom to limo around New York. Tacky? Absolutely. But it's impossible not to be massively entertained by a woman who refers euphemistically to oral sex as "going to Rio" in memory of the first man who suggested she get a Brazilian bikini wax, considers vodka a food group and who holds up glamour as the first of the commandments. This is a savvy and viciously funny trip into a glittery, glitzy world we sure wouldn't want to live in-but by which we're more than happy to be vicariously consumed for the length of a book.

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Old 02-27-2005, 07:22 PM
 
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#14 Wild Fermentation by Sandor Ellix Katz. "if your desire is for perfectly uniform, predictable food, this is the wrong book for you." Sandor seems to ferment anything and everything edible. He admits to never measuring stuff when he makes bread (this is my kind of cooking). He calls the book process-oriented, and he's right -- it's about having a spirit of adventure in your approach to food (and life). It's definitely not your normal cookbook, as the writing ranges into politics, death, gender identity, and cultured food as a metaphor for human culture. I did pick up some good tips on fermenting foods, and found some new recipes to try. I doubt that I'll try making miso or amasake anytime soon (I'd rather buy them), but I like knowing how to make them.
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Old 02-27-2005, 07:28 PM
 
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17. Lost by Gregory Maguire


This book was not what I was expecting- it deviates from the formula of Wicked, Mirror, Mirror, and Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister, but it was still good.

From Amazon.com

Quote:
Before he broke onto the adult bestseller lists with his irreverent interpretations of the Cinderella story (Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister) and the Wizard of Oz (Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West), Maguire wrote children's books with titles like Six Haunted Hairdos, Seven Spiders Spinning and Four Stupid Cupids. His latest is a virtual literary paella of adult and children's fantasies: Jack the Ripper, A Christmas Carol, Alice in Wonderland, Peter Pan, The Exorcist even a wafting glimpse of Dracula. The result is a deftly written, compulsively readable modern-day ghost story that easily elicits suspension of disbelief. American writer Winifred Rudge, whose mass market book about astrology has been far more successful than her fiction, is in London to research a novel linking Jack the Ripper to the house in Hampstead where her own great-great-grandfather rumored to be the model for Ebenezer Scrooge lived. But as Winifred discovers, there is no evidence that the Ripper ever visited Hampstead, let alone buried one of his victims inside the chimney of a house there, and his presence in the story is a red herring. Much more interesting is the mysterious disappearance of Winnie's cousin, John Comestor, the latest resident of the family house. Moreover, something is making an infernal racket inside the chimney, and soon there are other bizarre manifestations of some unseen force. A Dickensian assortment of neighbors (one dotty lady is called Mrs. Maddingly) variously obfuscate and hint at strange events. Maguire's prose is both jaunty and scary; he knows how to mix spooky ingredients with contemporary situations. By the time a spirit called Gervasa begins to speak through Winnie, readers will be hooked.

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Old 02-27-2005, 10:42 PM
 
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#17 Paradise Fields by Katie Fforde

I must have liked it, since I only started in this morning : Just another fun romance novel.

From Amazon.co.uk
Katie Fforde's Paradise Fields does most of the things that a mid-life romantic novel ought and manages to have a charm that is all of its own. Youngish widow Nel has thrown herself into organising a farmer's market to raise money for a local hospice and is appalled when the land they use is to be sold for jerry-built housing. She is even more upset to find herself attracted to the young solicitor who is acting for the other side in the deal--one of the infuriating things about Nel is that she thinks of herself as sufficiently past-it that she would rather date the sniffy prig Simon than Jake, whose view of her as gorgeous she finds herself unable to trust.

Romantic novels such as this are built on the confounding of our expectations, but there are pleasant surprises beyond the usual--Fforde is very good, for example, on Nel's gradual softening towards Kerry Anne, the snotty American wife of the land's owner and on how a shared interest in organic skin products can make up for a lot of hostility. Not a ground-breaking book in any way, Paradise Fields nonetheless offers a pleasant mix of social observation, farce and mild steaminess. --Roz Kaveney
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Old 02-28-2005, 02:47 AM
 
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#8 - My Sisters Keeper by Jodi Picoult

Amazon description:
Anna is not sick, but she might as well be. By age thirteen, she has undergone countless surgeries, transfusions, and shots so that her older sister, Kate, can somehow fight the leukemia that has plagued her since childhood. The product of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, Anna was conceived as a bone marrow match for Kate -- a life and a role that she has never challenged...until now. Like most teenagers, Anna is beginning to question who she truly is. But unlike most teenagers, she has always been defined in terms of her sister -- and so Anna makes a decision that for most would be unthinkable, a decision that will tear her family apart and have perhaps fatal consequences for the sister she loves.
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Old 02-28-2005, 02:16 PM
 
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Here goes - my last post for Februrary -

#32 Turtle Moon by Alice Hoffman

Well - this was the first book by Hoffman that I was not really that thrilled with. It was written well and the story was interesting but it was too much like everything else out there.

It is a bit more complex than most of her books - there are stories of several people who all end up coming together. There is a mom who ran away from her husband with their baby - changed identifies and ends up getting murdered - the baby is gone. There is a divorced mom who can't control her teenage son, a cold and bitter cop trying to solve the murder who falls for the divorced mom, the wonderful old foster mother who can get through to any kid . . . you get the picture.

#33 The Family Nutrition Book by William and Martha Sears

What a great book. I think I will buy a copy to keep. There is so much great information - a lot that I already know and teach but more that I didn't. Good stuff about allergies, food for the brain, nutrition for kids (baby thru teenage), lots of vegetarian info. Nice friendly style of writing too.

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
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Old 02-28-2005, 03:00 PM
 
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Well, it's still Feb, so I'll post here.

#10 the curious incident of the dog in the night-time by mark haddon.

cute, funny, fast and easy read. it's already been reviewed this month, so i'm not going to say much about it. it's basically about an autistic boy whose life falls apart and how he deals with it. great insight into a male austistic teenager's mind. fascinating and interesting.

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Old 02-28-2005, 03:45 PM
 
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"Haunted Encounters: Real-Life Stories of Supernatural Experiences", a collection of stories

Description from the www.hauntedencounters.com website:
Quote:
Forty-six stories from all over the land, each with one thing in common - true supernatural experiences, told by the very people that actually lived them. Read about "The Water Ghost", "The Thin One", and many other specters that haved returned to this Earthly plane for a visit.
"Ghosts Among Us: True Stories of Spirit Encounters" by Leslie Rule

from Amazon:
Quote:
Macabre and fascinating, Ghosts Among Us offers true-life, haunting accounts of eerie visitations and paranormal experiences along with artistically shot black-and-white photographs of haunted sites. The personal, firsthand reports and chilling, full-length stories are bolstered by sidebars of actual accounts of "Ghosts in the News." Each chapter explores mysterious events-events that the reader will find hard to pass off as mere coincidence. In her quest to uncover explanations for each incident, Leslie Rule extensively researched library archives and interviewed credible witnesses, historians, renowned psychics, and parapsychologists. Throughout Ghosts Among Us, Rule's findings are mesmerizing. She writes about being raised in a haunted house. "To top that," Rule explains, "[my mother] introduced me to a serial killer when I was fourteen." The reader is invited to skip ahead to learn about that chilling episode . . . but the pages prior to that offer their own gripping, spell-binding encounters.
Yesterday was another lazy Sunday spent lounging in the big cushy chairs at Barnes & Noble sipping tea, nursing the baby and reading books. My favorite way to spend an afternoon.

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Old 02-28-2005, 04:14 PM
 
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Holy Hannah, is it the end of the month already???!!

Well, I must say ladies that I have really enjoyed this thread. It's forced me to take some "me" time and read, and I have chosen some books I might not have otherwise.


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Old 02-28-2005, 05:26 PM
 
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My last of the month too...and all I can say is HOLY COW! I'm way ahead of schedule for myself here.

#25 Kira-Kira by Cynthia Kadohata

Quote:
kira-kira (kee' ra kee' ra): glittering; shining

Glittering. That's how Katie Takeshima's sister, Lynn, makes everything seem. The sky is kira-kira because its color is deep but see-through at the same time. The sea is kira-kira for the same reason. And so are people's eyes. When Katie and her family move from a Japanese community in Iowa to the Deep South of Georgia, it's Lynn who explains to her why people stop them on the street to stare. And it's Lynn who, with her special way of viewing the world, teaches Katie to look beyond tomorrow. But when Lynn becomes desperately ill, and the whole family begins to fall apart, it is up to Katie to find a way to remind them all that there is always something glittering -- kira-kira -- in the future
.

This was a YA book, but I had read the synopsis in our local book rag and it sounded good and was!
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Old 02-28-2005, 07:07 PM
 
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Cathe, I love the Dr. Sears nutrition book...it explains concepts so simply. I learned so much from it.

#12 What your doctor may not tell you about premenopause by Dr. John Lee and Dr. Jesse Hanley. Someone recommended this as a help for TTC to explain how all the hormones work. I don't think I'm premenopausal but I did learn quite a bit about hormones. I'm a bit skeptical of natural progesterone cream being the cure-all they say it is, but I will keep it in mind. Someone on Amazon recommends Screaming to be Heard as a counterpoint to this.

Here's the review:
Quote:
Are you a woman between 35 and 50 experiencing PMS, migraine headaches, sudden weight gain, fatigue, irritability, tender or lumpy breasts, memory loss, fibroids, or cold hands and feet? If so, you may be experiencing symptoms of premenopause. Even if you're a decade or more away from menopause, your hormones may already be out of balance, usually caused by an excess of estrogen and a deficiency of progesterone, say the authors of What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Premenopause. John Lee, M.D., is a well-known advocate of the benefits of natural progesterone and the author of What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause. Jesse Hanley, M.D., adds sensitivity to the emotional and spiritual aspects of premenopause. The authors recommend natural progesterone cream to balance your hormones, eliminate premenopausal symptoms, and make you feel better. They also discuss the dangers of xenohormones--substances not found in nature that have hormonal effects--frequently found in pesticides, solvents, plastics, and hormone-treated meat. The book presents common symptoms of premenopause with suggested natural treatments (progesterone cream, diet, vitamins, and herbs) and substances to avoid, plus additional chapters on diet and exercise. Many case studies help to bring the information into perspective. If you are premenopausal (or close to someone who is), this is a valuable resource.
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Old 02-28-2005, 07:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
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OMG we did great ladies!!! I am going to start the MArch thread today so that I don't forget and you can all post on that starting tonight or tomorrow!!!


Thanks again for posting and lurking here, this is the most successful threads I have ever started and probably ever will!!! :LOL

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Old 03-01-2005, 02:48 AM
 
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#4 Wicked, The life and times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire.
Well, I know this has been read and discussed a lot here, so I won't say much. I really liked this book, although it was so much different than what I expected. I will have to read his other books.

I had a bad February, not a lot of reading, but March will be better! I have a stack of books as tall as me to read, and I am ready for the challenge!!
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Old 03-01-2005, 03:03 AM
 
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#9 Vive le Vegan! by Dreena Burton

So this is a cookbook, but I read them from cover to cover, so I think it counts. Anyhow, I've been trying to stock up on family type cookbooks and this one has caught my eye for quite a while now. Good info, great looking recipes. Can't wait to try some. And I like that the great majority of her recipes don't contain soy or meat substitutes.

Mama to 3:
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Old 03-01-2005, 12:41 PM
 
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18. Hangman by Chris Bohjalian

From Amazon.com
Quote:
Soon after this smoothly written mystery/horror novel begins, Marcia Middleton finds the body of her husband, Brian, hanging from the attic rafters of their new house in Deering, Vt. Relocated New Yorkers, the couple had moved only a month before--shortly after Brian had confessed to an adulterous affair. An autopsy reveals that the victim was dead before his body was hoisted. Once the police learn about Brian's indiscretion and his wife-beating, they label Marcia a murder suspect. Detective J. P. Burrows, however, can't find any evidence against the widow, though he does build a case that an evil force in the Middleton house killed Brian. In the meantime, the beautiful Marcia seems to be going slowly out of her mind--from guilt perhaps. Burrows finds out, too late for one victim, that a conscience can be a dangerous thing. Bohjalian's ( A Killing in the Real World ) plot glides to a chilling conclusion.
Liked it (and finished it around 10 last night!)

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Old 03-01-2005, 12:44 PM
 
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19. The Arrowhead Mills Cookbook by Vicki Rae Chelf

This is one of the best natural foods cookbooks I have ever read. It was filled with practical advice. It explained all the ingredients, where to buy them, in what order to buy them to switch to a natural kitchen, how to cook with them, how to store them. There were even "routines" for things like breadmaking, growing sprouts, and soaking beans (how to fit it into your day)

I really loved this book! It is vegatarian.

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Old 03-01-2005, 02:39 PM
 
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just to let you all know, the March thread has started...I don't want anyone to miss these great recs. - Wicked is one of my favorite books!
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