Book Challenge 2005: February - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-01-2005, 08:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
MamaBug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Neverland
Posts: 9,107
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ok so here is the new thread for this month! We got so many wonderful entries in the last thread, that I look forward to getting some new ideas. My reading has stalled in the last few weeks, but I have been compiling a list of books to start this month off right!

Thanks to all those who post and lurk for joining me in this wonderful reading adventure!

We may not have it all together, but together we have it all
MamaBug is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-01-2005, 08:18 PM
 
Meli65's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: the town where rock lives
Posts: 2,138
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Subscribing....
I love this thread too. Am thrilled to be a part of it -- I am so much more intentional about my reading!
Meli65 is offline  
Old 02-01-2005, 08:34 PM - Thread Starter
 
MamaBug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Neverland
Posts: 9,107
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Me too. I am going to try and really get more done this month. I have been such a slacker! I will never reach my goal if I keep this up. My only saving grace will be summer when we go to the lake and the kids let me have HOURS to read while they play :LOL

We may not have it all together, but together we have it all
MamaBug is offline  
Old 02-01-2005, 08:53 PM
 
Astrid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: perpetual motion
Posts: 1,679
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just subscribing!

Thanks to this thread, I have so many books on my hold list at the library! I can't wait to read them
Astrid is offline  
Old 02-01-2005, 08:55 PM - Thread Starter
 
MamaBug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Neverland
Posts: 9,107
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Your very welcome! I am glad that so many ppl seem to enjoy this. I know that it is nice to discuss books as well, but I for one don't really have the time to do that. I like that this is a place where I can come and browse titles and content and then put them on hold right over the computer.

We may not have it all together, but together we have it all
MamaBug is offline  
Old 02-01-2005, 09:19 PM
 
konamama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Big Island of Hawaii
Posts: 1,316
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
back for another round - on #4 and liking it - will write more when I have finished it.
konamama is offline  
Old 02-01-2005, 09:19 PM
 
annettemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the Restricted Section
Posts: 34,451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
So, what exactly do we do here?
Annette

Flowers, fairies, gardens, and rainbows-- Seasons of Joy: 10 weeks of crafts, handwork, painting, coloring, circle time, fairy tales, and more!
Check out the blog for family fun, homeschooling, books, simple living, and 6 fabulous children, including twin toddlers

annettemarie is offline  
Old 02-01-2005, 10:03 PM
 
Indigo73's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Southeastern CT
Posts: 2,362
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
#21 The Devil's Door by Sharan Newman

Stayed up way too late last night to finish this one. But it was so good. I am definitely going to have to find some of Sharan's non-fiction as well as gobble up all of her books in this series. If you like medievel history and mysteries - a must read.

From Publishers Weekly
Countess Alys of Tonnerre, victim of a brutal beating, is barely alive when her husband Raynald brings her to the Abbess Heloise at the convent of the Paraclete in medieval France. Young Catherine LeVendeur, who helps care for Alys, is disturbed by scars that attest to the woman's prior mistreatment. Upon the Countess's death, the Paraclete inherits a small piece of unimpressive land, which sets off a furor: Raynald claims the convent stole the property, and the prior of a nearby monastery makes a handsome offer for it. Catherine maintains her intense curiosity about Alys's unhappy end even through the arrival of her betrothed, Edgar of Wedderlie, with Peter Abelard; after Catherine and Edgar's wedding, the pair travel to Troyes and, at Heloise's request, search for information on the mysterious bequest. Catherine soons stumbles on another mystery: the discovery of a headless corpse that may ignite the anti-Semitism that is running high during this Easter season of A.D. 1140. With this meticulously prepared work, Newman ( Death Comes as Epiph any ) adroitly crafts a puzzle in which the intriguing medieval material, providing much more than mere background, informs the entire novel with a vivid sense of past and guides the responses of the engaging, lively cast.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

My family of 3 (plus pup) Indigo (Aimee), Rob (dp), Ryne (ds) & Phebe (dog), plus my BIL's family of 3.

 
"The best way to predict the future is to invent it." - Alan Kay

Indigo73 is offline  
Old 02-01-2005, 10:03 PM
 
MrsMissy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I finished reading "Bergdorf Blondes" today. Does that count? I started it on Sunday.

My review:
I kept reading it thinking "This is so stupid! Why am I reading this? What happens next?" Then I couldn't put it down. Not a positive review, but not a negative review.
MrsMissy is offline  
Old 02-01-2005, 10:31 PM - Thread Starter
 
MamaBug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Neverland
Posts: 9,107
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Annette. Is started this thread as a way to set a goal for myself for the year to read a set amount of books. This is basically a way for us to keep track, tell others about the books we read and find some new books to read ourselves. What most ppl do is post the title and author of the book and then a summary of it, and then whether they liked it or not and why. I usually post the summary from amazon because it makes it easier on me :LOL

Some ppl have set a goal for themselves, like mine is 120 for the year, others just want to come to see what books others are liking and also to give recommendations of their own. Last year I only started the thread at the end of the year. And we got ALOT of responses, so we all thought that since we are starting again in January that we would start a new thread for each month. If you look you will see there is also a thread with the same title, but for January.

MrsMissy, yes of course it counts. I usually add to my list the day I finish the book. BTW I have been wanting to read that book and forgot about it, added it to the list today! Thanks!

We may not have it all together, but together we have it all
MamaBug is offline  
Old 02-01-2005, 10:37 PM
 
annettemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the Restricted Section
Posts: 34,451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Great! I'm in.

I have no goals, though.

Annette

Flowers, fairies, gardens, and rainbows-- Seasons of Joy: 10 weeks of crafts, handwork, painting, coloring, circle time, fairy tales, and more!
Check out the blog for family fun, homeschooling, books, simple living, and 6 fabulous children, including twin toddlers

annettemarie is offline  
Old 02-01-2005, 10:45 PM
 
chefkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Seattle
Posts: 67
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm going to stop lurking and join this thread. This will be fun - I love hearing about what every is reading and getting ideas for new books.

I don't have a goal for myself, but I read as often as I can - usually an hour or so at night after the kids are in bed. I usually have a couple of books going at a time, since I have a need to match my reading material to my mood. And my mood changes pretty often these days! Right now I'm reading America (the book) and Einstein Never Used Flash Cards. Next up: The Dive from Clausen's Pier by Ann Packer.
chefkath is offline  
Old 02-01-2005, 11:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
MamaBug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Neverland
Posts: 9,107
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
OMG Kathleen I do the same thing. Right now I have 5 books going and I only read what the mood calls for!

Welcome to both of you!

We may not have it all together, but together we have it all
MamaBug is offline  
Old 02-02-2005, 12:51 AM
 
Nosy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,091
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
#5 Baby Catcher by Peggy Vincent

I know lots of people have already read this, but this is the best book I've read in a while! I'm a birth junkie, though. I loved this book-great stories.

From Amazon: "Each time she knelt to "catch" another wriggling baby -- nearly three thousand times during her remarkable career -- California midwife Peggy Vincent paid homage to the moment when pain bows to joy and the world makes way for one more. With every birth, she encounters another woman-turned-goddess: Catherine rides out her labor in a car careening down a mountain road. Sofia spends hers trying to keep her hyper doctor-father from burning down the house. Susannah gives birth so quietly that neither husband nor midwife notice until there's a baby in the room.


More than a collection of birth stories, however, Baby Catcher is a provocative account of the difficulties that midwives face in the United States. With vivid portraits of courage, perseverance, and love, this is an impassioned call to rethink technological hospital births in favor of more individualized and profound experiences in which mothers and fathers take center stage in the timeless drama of birth."
Nosy is offline  
Old 02-02-2005, 05:23 AM
 
konamama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Big Island of Hawaii
Posts: 1,316
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I loved THE BABY CATCHER - such an interesting book in many ways - worth reading for anyone who is into the "birth shelf" as my husband calls it :-))
konamama is offline  
Old 02-02-2005, 03:30 PM
 
Nosy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,091
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yeah, I have a "birth shelf", too. BTW, we got married (planned elopement) in Kona...awesome place!
Nosy is offline  
Old 02-02-2005, 10:12 PM
 
Suzannah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,161
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I am subscribing to this to lurk and get suggestions...last month was waaaaaay too long, though; it's hard to get the titles and synopsis...

HoneyFern

The Blog

Never let your schooling interfere with your education. ~Mark Twain~

Suzannah is offline  
Old 02-03-2005, 01:01 AM
 
loftmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: in a hammock with a book
Posts: 3,186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Okay, I finally finished my last book. It took waaaay too long.

Slaves in the Family by Edward Ball

I don't remember what number it is. I'll have to go back and find my last post. I'm really looking forward to moving through some books. But I'm not a fast non-fiction reader and I've got several non-fiction books in queue.

Anyway...

This was a very interesting, very educational, very thorough historical-type book. Publisher's comments:

Slaves in the Family is the winner of the 1998 National Book Award for nonfiction and hailed by The New Yorker as "a brilliant blend of archival research and oral history." First-time author and award-winning journalist Edward Ball confronts the legacy of his family's slave-owning past, uncovering the story of the people, both black and white, who lived and worked on the Balls' South Carolina plantations. It is an unprecedented family record that reveals how the painful legacy of slavery continues to endure in America's collective memory and experience.

Author Edward Ball, a descendant of one of the largest slave-owning families in the South, discovered that his ancestors owned 25 rice plantations, worked by nearly 4,000 slaves. In Slaves in the Family, he confronts his past — scouring family archives, parish records, telephone directories, and historical-society collections. Ball's fact-finding took him slogging not only down the back roads of Carolina's low country but also to West Africa to meet the descendants of the traders who sold slaves to the family.

Through meticulous research and by interviewing scattered relatives, Ball contacted some 100,000 African-Americans living in the U.S. today who are all descendants of Ball slaves. In intimate conversations with them, he garnered information, hard words, and devastating family stories of precisely what it means to be enslaved. He found that the family plantation owners were far from benevolent patriarchs; instead there is a dark history of exploitation, interbreeding, and extreme violence against the slaves.

Slaves in the Family is an extraordinary and poignant account of interwoven lives and one man's effort to come to terms with his disturbing family legacy and his nation's past.


I like to breeze through books and, as thought-provoking as this one was, I couldn't do that. Though parts of it did read easily b/c it was so fascinating, toward the end I felt like I was really working to get through it - at least through all the details about emancipation. Anyway, a very timely read since it is Black History Month.

Speaking of Black History Month, may I take this moment to recomend a fascinating book: Dreams from my Father, by Barack Obama, 1st black Senator, I think.

books in queue:

Old School by Tobias Wolff (f)
Sibling Rivalry (non-f) by Adele Farber
Another Country (non-f) by Mary Pipher

There are some really great fiction books out there, but I have to get on the library waiting list first! I'm so ready for some fun fiction.

Homeschool Planet http://planethomeschool.net
loftmama is offline  
Old 02-03-2005, 01:49 AM
 
broodymama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Watching the rain
Posts: 7,286
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
yet another tasty little bit of fluff... I love her novels, but this one not quite so much.

"Wait Until Midnight" by Amanda Quick

from Amazon:
Those who have enjoyed Quick's popular Regency mysteries featuring Lavinia Lake and Tobias March (Late for the Wedding) may find some pleasure in this Victorian romance/mystery, but others, particularly fans of Quick's earlier works (Mistress, etc.), will feel shortchanged by its weak plotting. Caroline Fordyce, who writes a popular fiction serial, and mysterious gentleman Adam Hardesty make a likable couple, but since virtually no obstacles stand in the way of their union, there's little suspense in watching them come together after only a few heated kisses. Both skeptics, the pair become involved in the Victorian craze for mediums and all things spiritualist after Adam stumbles across a murdered medium and finds a list of names, with Caroline's figured prominently. Alas, there are only two viable suspects, and Quick's sleight of hand is scant. Her characters are given to chunks of exposition that reveal the mechanics of the plot. (For example, a medium delivers a convenient monologue in an empty room.) Despite these flaws, this book remains a pleasant enough diversion, even if it pales in comparison to the author's best work.

Chaotic uc.jpg homeschool.gif mama to 5 plus a bonus one on the way.  stork-suprise.gif

chicken3.gif

broodymama is offline  
Old 02-03-2005, 09:43 AM
 
Queen Gwen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Missouri
Posts: 1,821
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
#9 The True and outstanding Adventures of the Hunt Sisters by Elisabeth Robinson. Very well written, as Cathe said. My aunt (and family) went through an almost identical oncology scenario over the past year+, so this was quite a wrenching read for me.
Queen Gwen is offline  
Old 02-03-2005, 12:19 PM
 
annettemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the Restricted Section
Posts: 34,451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Slatewiper by Lewis Perdue.
From Amazon
Quote:
Humanity's very existence is at stake in this latest hair-raiser by Perdue (Daughter of God), a no-holds-barred biogenetic thriller. Lara Blackwood, founder of GenIntron, a company devoted to gene manipulation as a method of fighting genetic diseases such as Tay-Sachs and sickle-cell anemia, is a tough hybrid of brilliant scientist, beauty and fighter. As the novel begins, GenIntron has been forced into economic difficulty and bought by the internationally powerful Japanese Daiwa Ichiban Corporation and its racist head, Tokutaro Kurata. In his first move, Kurata perverts Blackwood's work by creating a new genetic weapon, graphically named Slatewiper, with which he intends to rid Tokyo of its hated Korean immigrants. Thousands of dead Koreans fill the streets, and puzzled doctors postulate a new and unknown disease. Kurata dreams of reviving Japanese militarism, refusing to acknowledge defeat in WWII and denying the horrifying Japanese atrocities of that war and earlier Asian wars. He plans to sell the deadly gene to nations wishing to eliminate their own minorities, or for use against enemies, while plotting to promote Japanese superiority and racial purity. Aiding Kurata is Blackwood's nemesis, Sheila Gaillard, as beautiful and brilliant as Blackwood and altogether deadly, and Kurata's nephew and heir, American-taught Akira Sugawara, loyal but finally driven to rebellion by the horrors he witnesses. Perdue never strays far from form-garish violence, one-dimensional characters, mechanical climax-but in the light of current medical epidemics, this is a timely offering.
OK, one of my biggest faults as a reader is that even when a book totally sucks, I can't put it down. This book totally sucks. The racism that was part of the plot just came off as racism- you didn't get the feeling the author disapproved or anything. Characters sort of wander in aimlessly, get killed off, and are never heard from again. The main character has so many skills, it makes you want to throw up. She's a Noble Prize-winning bioengineer. Wait, she's an Olympic athlete. Oh my gosh, she can shoot. Whoa, now she's a ninja. Honestly, it was as if it were written by a gifted middle school student.
I bought this at the supermarket one day while waiting for my dh to meet me for lunch. It has taken me three months to slog my way through it (I can usually read a book like this in a day). Although it promised on the cover to be like a Michael Crichton novel, it lied.

Oh, and the ending sucked too.

Annette

Flowers, fairies, gardens, and rainbows-- Seasons of Joy: 10 weeks of crafts, handwork, painting, coloring, circle time, fairy tales, and more!
Check out the blog for family fun, homeschooling, books, simple living, and 6 fabulous children, including twin toddlers

annettemarie is offline  
Old 02-03-2005, 05:35 PM
 
MaggiesMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Riding a horse of a different color
Posts: 1,100
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just finished reading The Red Tent. It has been talked about a lot in the other threads, so I won't post the blurb, but I will just say that I really enjoyed this read. I did find some of it a little disturbing (Dinah's coming of age ritual was a little too graphic for me), but all in all it was a page-turner for me and very well-written.

1) Daughter of God
2) The Lovely Bones
3) The Shattering
4) Artemis Fowl: The Eternity Code
5) The Burning
6) Shadow Divers
7) Shadowmancer
8) Recipes For a Small Planet
9) The Red Tent
MaggiesMom is offline  
Old 02-03-2005, 05:48 PM
 
cathe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 5,727
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
After several starts of really bad books, I finally found one worth finishing.

#18 - Echo by Francesca Lia Block - description of book in January thread

This was not at all what I expected in a YA book - I sure wouldn't want one of my girls to read this as a teenager - maybe college age . . . . there was some sexual stuff that I wouldn't think appropriate for a young girl.

Other than that - this was a very unusual book - beautiful, poetic writing, mystical style with some serious issues. Very good.

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
cathe is offline  
Old 02-04-2005, 01:59 AM
 
Astrid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: perpetual motion
Posts: 1,679
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
#8 Homeschooling for Excellence by David and Micki Colfax

Since I hardly see any homeschooling books in my local library, when I saw this one I grabbed it. I was pleased that it was recommending child-led learning.

From Amazon.com
Role models for a generation of homeschoolers, David and Micki Colfax are teachers turned ranchers who taught their four sons at home in the 1970s and '80s and schooled three of them into Harvard. Isolation on their northern California homestead forced them into the experience, but this resourceful family eventually discovered all kinds of advantages to home education. Like a modern-day Little House on the Prairie, the Colfax children learned about geometry while constructing outbuildings on their ranch, explored aspects of chemistry and biology as they improved their livestock and garden, and generally discovered the value of self-reliance as they went about life without TV or neighbors. Their world is described in clear, warm words that illustrate the fondness these parents and children possess for each other. Family photos grouped throughout the book show the boys working and learning together.

The Colfaxes don't purport to be experts; they don't prescribe a formula for their success. Rather, their experience is described as a trial-and-error effort, with some of their mistakes offered up as lessons for others. The value of critically examining textbooks in advance, for instance, is learned after one son falls behind in algebra using a schoolbook that touts "new math" principles. The Colfaxes' philosophy is that every child is gifted. Parents don't need to be certified teachers to teach them (although it does ward off doubters). But, despite the contention of some homeschoolers, the Colfaxes do caution that teaching at home requires much time and money--and they don't advise it for single parents or most working women. Any parent interested in connecting with his or her child, however, will find the Colfax take on life an enjoyable and enlightening read. The couple closes the book with an appendix of suggested references for building a family library and a delightful list of their children's favorite books.
Astrid is offline  
Old 02-04-2005, 02:06 AM
 
cathe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 5,727
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
That books sounds really cool - I'm going to see if my library has it.

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
cathe is offline  
Old 02-04-2005, 02:19 AM
 
broodymama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Watching the rain
Posts: 7,286
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
"To Wed a Scandalous Spy" by Celeste Bradley

from Amazon:
Lovely, high born Willa Trent was an orphan, raised by a local, somewhat odd family in the country, who want nothing but the best for their girl. So when she drags the unconscious man she accidentally hit with a slingshot home, they arrange a hasty marriage and pack the couple off with best wishes. Armed with a groggy husband and a new future, Willa's pie-eyed optimism has no limits...until she discovers the secret, dangerous world of Nathaniel Stonewell, Earl of Reardon, a.k.a. "Lord Treason."

Though Nathaniel is reviled by most of England for his devious plot against the Crown, he is, in reality, a member of an elite cadre of secret royal defenders on a daring undercover mission. He must keep his secrets at all cost, especially from Willa. And yet, he is enchanted...though he stubbornly refuses to surrender to his passion. Far better, he tells himself, to turn his back on love than risk everything for it. Luckily, his bride has other plans...

Chaotic uc.jpg homeschool.gif mama to 5 plus a bonus one on the way.  stork-suprise.gif

chicken3.gif

broodymama is offline  
Old 02-04-2005, 03:38 AM
 
loftmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: in a hammock with a book
Posts: 3,186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Phew! Finally got to read something fictional, fast and fun. Old School by Tobias Wolff (book #6 for me) is about a boys' boarding school. Enjoyable.

Publisher's comments:

Quote:
The protagonist of Tobias Wolff's shrewdly — and at times devastatingly — observed first novel is a boy at an elite prep school in 1960. He is an outsider who has learned to mimic the negligent manner of his more privileged classmates. Like many of them, he wants more than anything on earth to become a writer. But to do that he must first learn to tell the truth about himself.

The agency of revelation is the school literary contest, whose winner will be awarded an audience with the most legendary writer of his time. As the fever of competition infects the boy and his classmates, fraying alliances, exposing weaknesses, Old School explores the ensuing deceptions and betrayals with an unblinking eye and a bottomless store of empathy. The result is further evidence that Wolff is an authentic American master.

Homeschool Planet http://planethomeschool.net
loftmama is offline  
Old 02-04-2005, 01:17 PM
 
Alkenny's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: ...life is beautiful all the time
Posts: 11,719
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
#11 Lord of the Flies by William Golding

I won't put the synopsis, since I think it's pretty well known. With DS being into LOST with me though (on tv), someone suggested this for him to read and I wanted to reread it to make sure it's appropriate.
Alkenny is offline  
Old 02-04-2005, 05:48 PM
 
MaggiesMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Riding a horse of a different color
Posts: 1,100
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
10) The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon.

Here's the blurb from Amazon:
"Narrated by a fifteen-year-old autistic savant obsessed with Sherlock Holmes, this dazzling novel weaves together an old-fashioned mystery, a contemporary coming-of-age story, and a fascinating excursion into a mind incapable of processing emotions.

Christopher John Francis Boone knows all the countries of the world and their capitals and every prime number up to 7,057. Although gifted with a superbly logical brain, Christopher is autistic. Everyday interactions and admonishments have little meaning for him. At fifteen, Christopher’s carefully constructed world falls apart when he finds his neighbour’s dog Wellington impaled on a garden fork, and he is initially blamed for the killing.

Christopher decides that he will track down the real killer, and turns to his favourite fictional character, the impeccably logical Sherlock Holmes, for inspiration. But the investigation leads him down some unexpected paths and ultimately brings him face to face with the dissolution of his parents’ marriage. As Christopher tries to deal with the crisis within his own family, the narrative draws readers into the workings of Christopher’s mind.

And herein lies the key to the brilliance of Mark Haddon’s choice of narrator: The most wrenching of emotional moments are chronicled by a boy who cannot fathom emotions. The effect is dazzling, making for one of the freshest debut in years: a comedy, a tearjerker, a mystery story, a novel of exceptional literary merit that is great fun to read."


I really, really enjoyed this book. I got it out of the library last night, and it was a very quick read. Although I am by no stretch of the imagination an expert about autism, I believe this book COULD have been written by a person with autism- the routines that guide the narrator's life remind me very much of a gentleman I work with who is autistic, and it was interesting to get an "inside perspective," which although not written by somebody with autism, was written by somebody with experience working with people who are autistic. It was very compassionately written and I would highly recommend it.

1) Daughter of God
2) The Lovely Bones
3) The Shattering
4) Artemis Fowl: The Eternity Code
5) The Burning
6) Shadow Divers
7) Shadowmancer
8) Recipes For a Small Planet
9) The Red Tent
10) The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
MaggiesMom is offline  
Old 02-04-2005, 11:10 PM
 
Meli65's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: the town where rock lives
Posts: 2,138
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oooh, two of my recent favorites: Old School, and The Curious Incident...

Consider them highly recommended from me, too!
Meli65 is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off