January 2007 Book Challenge - Page 5 - Mothering Forums

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#121 of 237 Old 01-15-2007, 09:53 PM
 
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KH - I enjoyed her Islam: A Short History a few years ago and Buddha last month. I was just surprised that someone could have such contempt for her, though it is a creative tag.

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#122 of 237 Old 01-15-2007, 10:11 PM
 
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I just read Outlander by Diana Gabaldon. It was amazing. It had such depth of character, great settings, and a complexity of plot that I haven't experienced in a while. Now I'm reading Angel Falls by Nora Roberts. I know, Nora Roberts is hardly great literature. But I LOVE her books. Such good relaxing, no thinking entertainment. So far it is not disappointing at all.
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#123 of 237 Old 01-15-2007, 11:30 PM
 
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Bufomander, I read all the Diane Mott Davidsons too. Actually, I started listening to the most recent one ("Dark Tort") on tape during a business trip. I realized then that her writing is sooooo repetitive! But when I'm reading it myself I don't notice. Oh well...didn't stop me from checking out the book from the library when I got home (I hadn't finished the entire audio set so I didn't know whodunnit yet!).
yep, they really aren't that great! some are better than others, but for some reason i keep reading them. i'm sure i'll get the next one eventually here!

#10 Real Food: What to Eat and Why by Nina Planck

another very interesting food book. (keep thinking of you, cathe, when i read these) written by the daughter of virginia vegetable farmers, she "explains how the foods we've eaten for thousands of years -- pork, lamb, raw milk cheese, sea salt -- have been falsely accused. Industrial foods like corn syrup, which lurks everywhere from fruit juice to chicken broth, are to blame for the triple epidemic of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease, not real food."

the author was once vegan, which makes me feel like she somehow has more weight behind her argument...
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#124 of 237 Old 01-15-2007, 11:31 PM
 
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I just read Outlander by Diana Gabaldon. It was amazing. It had such depth of character, great settings, and a complexity of plot that I haven't experienced in a while. .
i keep thinking i'm going to read some of her stuff... is outlander part of a series?
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#125 of 237 Old 01-16-2007, 12:40 AM
 
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con leche - I haven't read that one, but I loved one of her other books (Behind the Scenes at the Museum)
I have that on my bookshelf! I do plan on reading it. I was supposed to read it when I was pregnant with ds, but someone warned me not to. I can't remember why.
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#126 of 237 Old 01-16-2007, 10:08 AM
 
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Yeah, Outlander is the first book in a six book series.
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#127 of 237 Old 01-16-2007, 10:37 AM
 
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#1 Wishes, Kisses, and Pigs by Betsy Hearne

This middle-grade novel has been on my shelf for quite a while. After a string of three books I couldn't finish, I decided to go with something I knew I could. This was a very sweet story, and the dialog between the main character and her mother was hilarious, I thought. It's funny that I chose this book over others that I could have because the premise turned out to be very similar to another one I recently read, Well Wished. In this book as well, you have to be careful what you wish for. I also loved how central animals were to the story, especially my favorite--pigs! Here's a great line from the book: "Animals were just as important as people, even if most people didn't think so."

Expecting #2 in May 2013!

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#128 of 237 Old 01-16-2007, 11:53 AM
 
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#4: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

This is my third time through for this book....DH got me the UK edition so I used that as an excuse to read it again....LOL. I'm a big fan so of course I enjoyed it...though I do wish she'd flesh out the characters a bit more. But now I really, really, REALLY can't wait for the seventh book. Sigh.....

Nancy

A writer/runner/thinker/wife with two daughters (11/02 and 8/05), one dog, three cats, seven fish, and a partridge in a pear tree... in Vermont.
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#129 of 237 Old 01-16-2007, 01:20 PM
 
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i keep thinking i'm going to read some of her stuff... is outlander part of a series?
I highly recommend this series . They look intimidating because they are so big but it is so enthralling that it doesn't feel like it once your reading!
My only complaint is I have to wait 4 years until her next one!
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#130 of 237 Old 01-16-2007, 01:41 PM
 
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Okay, just finished #4
The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion.
It is a pretty personal account of how she dealt with the double whammy of her daughter becoming terribly ill and being in the hospital for months and the sudden death of her husband of 40 years. Overall it was okay. There were certainly some thoughts she had on grief that I connected to, but much of it was such personal reminiscence that I honestly wasn't that interested. However, I haven't read much of her other work so my interest in her was not as great as it might have been.

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#131 of 237 Old 01-16-2007, 05:21 PM
 
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Another middle-grade novel...

#2 Seedfolks by Paul Fleischman

This is a beautifully rich story. Each chapter is told by a different person with their own history and culture. The details in each person's story are amazing. And I love that it's a young girl who starts the garden that becomes such a large part of all their lives.

Expecting #2 in May 2013!

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#132 of 237 Old 01-16-2007, 05:31 PM
 
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3rd one down, Flyte book two of the Septimus Heap series. Not heavy stuff, but good for a light relaxing read. Continues the story of Septimus, a Wizard who discovers himself in the first book, Magyk. In this story, he has to face his own fears a bit more, and there is a bit more personal adventures than then first. Good, and I'm sure there'll be another to the series.


#1 Helen of Troy # 2 Druids, Gods & Heroes #3 Flyte -Septimus Heap
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#133 of 237 Old 01-16-2007, 05:53 PM
 
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Ok, I'm joining in too. My goal is not a specific number of book (I read a LOT) but more to post on them after I read them. After getting a degree in English, I love fluff books, so be warned!

Candy, Mom to Matthew (5/02) and Ethan (10/07)

Trying for #3 starting 5/13

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#134 of 237 Old 01-16-2007, 06:15 PM
 
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#3 Homicide by David Simon

Non-fiction book about the Baltimore Police Dept, specifically the Homicide Unit. Not a book I ever thought I would enjoy, but David Simon is a great writer and I havent been able to put it down. I work a full time job plus have a toddler and have managed to finish the book in a week and its almost 700 pages!
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#135 of 237 Old 01-16-2007, 06:41 PM
 
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I have that on my bookshelf! I do plan on reading it. I was supposed to read it when I was pregnant with ds, but someone warned me not to. I can't remember why.
It's probably because of the first chapter. The book is told in the first person starting with the narrator's conception and birth (yes, it is a bit strange!), so early on in the book, you see the hospital nurses' attitudes toward newborns through the eyes of the narrator, a newborn herself at the time. Parts of the book are sad, but it's told with such humor and wit.

One book I'd warn pregnant women away from is Everything Is Illuminated - I wasn't even pregnant and was so upset I was shaking during one part.

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#136 of 237 Old 01-16-2007, 08:23 PM
 
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Started Running with Scissors (meh) and Jaques Pepin's The Apprentice:My Life in the Kitchen just arrived. Think I might have to put down Running with Scissors and start it.
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#137 of 237 Old 01-16-2007, 10:19 PM
 
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#5 A Woman's Eye, ed. Sara Paretsky

Quote:
A solid collection of 21 short stories by known and lesser-known female mystery writers. From the sweet revenge of ``Kill the Man for Me'' by Mary Wings, to the terror of ``Getting to Know You'' by Antonia Fraser, and on to the ancient ritual of Nancy Pickard's ``The Scar,'' there's not a weak story in the lot. A great way to introduce the mystery genre and some outstanding contemporary writers.
I really enjoyed many of these and may try several of the authors in a longer work.

#1 - Tiger in the Well, #2 - Laptop Lunch User's Guide, #3 An Inconvenient Truth, #4 Lucifer's Shadow, #5 A Woman's Eye
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#138 of 237 Old 01-17-2007, 12:09 AM
 
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#5: Mandy by Julie Andrews Edwards

Yes, THAT Julie Andrews...I have always liked "The Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles" so I thought I'd give another of her books a try. This one is okay....quite good really, for the 7-10 year old set that it's meant for. Mandy is an orphan who climbs the stone wall behind the orphanage and finds a wonderful abandoned cottage that she sets out to make into a "home" for herself. What will happen when people start noticing how often she is gone, and try to find out what she's doing? (Cue mystery music....) LOL

I may read this one aloud to DD in a year or so.

A writer/runner/thinker/wife with two daughters (11/02 and 8/05), one dog, three cats, seven fish, and a partridge in a pear tree... in Vermont.
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#139 of 237 Old 01-17-2007, 10:11 AM
 
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#5 A Quaker Book of Wisdom; Life Lessons In Simplicity, Service, And Common Sense
by . BY ROBERT LAWRENCE SMITH

Non fiction. Good. Cute little book full of good sense. Author talks about growing up as a Quaker, what is important etc. Each chapter talks about specific aspect; service, business, simplicity etc. Read it on my lunch break at work.

#6 Women of the Silk
by Gail Tsukiyama

Fiction. Good I guess. What I liked: it's set in China 1919-1938. Very interesting to read about different culture. Author described the area, people etc beautifully. What I didn't like: it's the type of story where things are ok, then they get bad, then they're ok again, then they get REALLY bad. Etc Etc till at the very end of the book where the 'happy ending' is that even though things really suck, life still goes on. It's a tad on the depressing side!

(Whoa, look at me, I'm on a roll! To be fair, #3 & #5 were small books)

#1 Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, #2 Sacred Contracts, #3 Yummy Yarns, #4 The Face (Dean Koontz), #5 A Quaker Book of Wisdom, #6 Women of the Silk
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#140 of 237 Old 01-17-2007, 05:10 PM
 
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Picking up where I left off...

I read 47 out of 52 books for my 2006 goal. I won't list them all but I'll list the ones I really liked:

1st to Die -- James Patterson

Outlander, Dragonfly in Amber, Voyager-- all three by Diana Gabaldon I love this series, I have the 4th on my bedside table -- it's set in Scotland long ago and there is love, action, scandal, and so much more. Definitely would recommend them but prepare to stop cleaning, cooking, and doing whatever else you need to do : )

Twelve Sharp -- Janet Evanovich One of a series of lighthearted, funny books about Stephanie Plum who is a bounty hunter and gets into all kinds of interesting situations. A quick read. I've read the other 11 and other books and they are really fun.

Fresh Milk: The Secret Life of Breasts -- Fiona Giles
Interesting and odd. I liked it but some parts were really out there.

The Lovely Bones -- Alice Sebold
Definitely held my interest -- it's about a girl who is murdered and is looking down on her family and friends as well as the man who killed her and narrating her story.

The Dogs of Babel -- Carolyn Parkhurst
I really liked this book. The review at Amazon is so much better than what I could say in just a few words and a few things were not so believable, but I overall thought this was a good story of love and loss.

Judge and Jury -- James Patterson
I just like his writing : )

The Husband -- Dean Koontz
SO good! I couldn't put it down. I could relate to the main character's franticness. My first book by this author but definitely not my last.

PHEW! Guess I will update more often! I am not sure of my goal for 2007 but I have a list of books to read and I am keeping track of what I've read. I hope to finish the Gabaldon "Outlander" series so that will take some time. Good luck readers! Keep all the good suggestions coming!
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#141 of 237 Old 01-17-2007, 05:31 PM
 
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The Dogs of Babel -- Carolyn Parkhurst
I really liked this book. The review at Amazon is so much better than what I could say in just a few words and a few things were not so believable, but I overall thought this was a good story of love and loss.
I loved this book! I don't know anyone else who's read it. One of the little tangents is kind of odd, but I cried so hard at the end.
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#142 of 237 Old 01-17-2007, 08:51 PM
 
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Finished this a few days ago, but finally getting around to posting:

#3 - The Last American Man by Elizabeth Gilbert

This is a reread for me. I enjoyed it just as much the second time around (and was amused by the paragraph on The Farm in the section on various utopian communities - I had no idea that was in there or what The Farm would come to mean to me when I first read the book).

The book focuses on Eustace Conway, self made mountain man, who in trying to convince Americans that they can live in the woods, has sacrificed a lot of his ideals about living in the woods and lives a fairly hectic life. He is absolutely fascinating to read about though, as he is so focused and determined, yet so tragically wounded at the same time.

It does make me want to leave behind the comforts of my home and try to do more for myself in terms of survival, even if I'm only making baby steps towards that goal.
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#143 of 237 Old 01-17-2007, 09:20 PM
 
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#1 Afflueza! Wonderful read and pretty funny to boot.

Now....The Overspent American.
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#144 of 237 Old 01-17-2007, 10:25 PM
 
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#10 Real Food: What to Eat and Why by Nina Planck

another very interesting food book. (keep thinking of you, cathe, when i read these) written by the daughter of virginia vegetable farmers, she "explains how the foods we've eaten for thousands of years -- pork, lamb, raw milk cheese, sea salt -- have been falsely accused. Industrial foods like corn syrup, which lurks everywhere from fruit juice to chicken broth, are to blame for the triple epidemic of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease, not real food."

the author was once vegan, which makes me feel like she somehow has more weight behind her argument...
Haven't read that one - I'll go request it.

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
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#145 of 237 Old 01-17-2007, 10:29 PM
 
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I loved "Dogs of Babel" too.


"Mountains Beyond Mountains" by Tracy Kidder

I got the recommendation for this one on the thread. Very intersting book about Paul Farmer's impacts on treatment of AIDS and TB - especially in Haiti. What an amazing man.

"Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow" by Faiza Guene

This book was great. Very fast read - originally written in French - about a Morrocan girl living in French slums.

Cathe Olson, author The Vegetarian Mother's Cookbook, Simply Natural Baby Food, and LIck It! Creamy Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.  
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#146 of 237 Old 01-17-2007, 11:49 PM
 
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#3 Someone to Watch Over Me by Judith McNaught

A fluff read for while I'm on my exercise bike. I really like her books - they are a blend of romance and mystery and very enjoyable

"Leigh Kendall, New York City actress, heads north in a blizzard to meet her husband at their new home. She loses her way, is rear-ended by a car, and wakes up in the hospital with too many questions. Where is her husband? Where is the house? And why is the notorious Michael Valente helping her solve these mysteries?"
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#147 of 237 Old 01-18-2007, 12:19 PM
 
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#3 Househusband by Ad Hudler

This was unexpectedly terrific. The cover was very cartoony -ha, ha, he cooks, he cleans, he parents, don't you want one like him? Dreadful marketing. But the book was a fantastic novel about a self-characterized control freak who leaves his landscape architecture company behind to follow his wife's new job to upstate New York, taking over responsibility on the home front for the housekeeping and care of their three year old daughter. It's sharp and funny and thoughtful, the characters develop and evolve in interesting ways, and it's an interesting meditation on gender relations. The obvious comparison is Little Children by Tom Perotta - which I thought was ridiculously over-rated and clearly written by someone who had no real idea what parents' lives are like. This is far, far better!
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#148 of 237 Old 01-18-2007, 12:43 PM
 
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The Husband -- Dean Koontz
SO good! I couldn't put it down. I could relate to the main character's franticness. My first book by this author but definitely not my last.
Might I recommend Watchers, Midnight and Lightning by Mr. Koontz, three of his very best.

"A mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge." - Tyrion Lannister

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#149 of 237 Old 01-18-2007, 02:23 PM
 
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Might I recommend Watchers, Midnight and Lightning by Mr. Koontz, three of his very best.

Thanks! I'll look for them next time I'm at the library!
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#150 of 237 Old 01-18-2007, 05:30 PM
 
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#1 The Mutant Message

EXCELLENT book. It's actually the 2nd time I've read this book. It's about a woman who went on a walkabout with an aborinigal tribe called The real people. I got so much out of this book the 2nd time. A lot of the things she speaks about relating to the Real People tribe is very much like the stuff in the movie*The Secret*.

#2 The Hurried child

Somewhat of a slow read for me. He gives lots of accounts on how our children today are more hurried than ever due to media, school, parents, sports...Nothing I didn't already know. Still a good book though.

Lola , loving my DH, Mama to & we &
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