Can I see pics of your daily schedules (if you use picture schedules) - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 12 Old 08-07-2009, 05:36 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I am trying to put together a picture routine chart for Boo (5). His ABA therapist recommended me taking pics of things he does and putting them on a chart for him. I have bought photo paper, taken pics and bought a poster board (and velcro). Now I don't know how to put it all together
I even have a schedule put together. Any ideas? Thanks

(He can't read yet so it has to be super simple).

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#2 of 12 Old 08-07-2009, 09:24 PM
 
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Well, I don't have pics taken of our picture schedule but I will try to describe them ... and if I can get pics taken/uploaded I will try to post them!

Anyway, I have two boys using picture schedules. My 8-year-old does not read, my 4 1/2-year-old does. I use pictures of actual things around the house, and pictures I found on google. I printed them all off in about a wallet size (9 pics per page) and laminated them. I cut a larger size poster board into two strips and stuck eight little velcro dots on each strip, then mounted these onto the wall using velcro. I put the opposite velcro piece on the backs of each pic and that's about it! I don't have space for the whole day's events, since I post each step in our morning and evening routines (brush teeth, wash face, brush hair, take bath, put on jammies, put clothes in laundry, take bath, etc.) so I usually put up the mornings pictures, then the afternoons, then the evenings. (My 4-year-old does insist that we don't leave any velcros empty so sometimes I have to be a little creative ... lol) I wrote on each picture a short description of that pic (1-2 words) but that was mostly to keep my 4-year-old happy. I also mounted (with a large heavy duty velcro piece) an old tupperware container on the wall next to the schedules and wrote "All done" on that in permanent marker, and the kids put each picture into this when the activity is completed.

Both kids really like it. I am constantly thinking of new pictures I want but I am going to have to find a larger storage container for all the pictures soon. Plus my toddler loves to dump the pictures all over the floor whenever he can get a hold of them ... so I obviously need a better place to store them!

One thing I might do differently is orient the schedule horizontally on the wall. Right now they are both mounted vertically since that is how they fit on the wall space we have open, but a friend of mine has hers mounted horizontally and I kind of like that better. Maybe because we read horizontally? Not sure, but I think I like horizontal better ... but the kids seem to "get it" just fine with the vertical mounting that we have.

I did make a separate schedule for each of the boys, although there is not a lot of difference in their days ... I can put up different activities for each of them during our "school" time (we homeschool) or if one has a doctor visit or whatever. It looks like I will need to make one up for our youngest, too, since he seems to feel left out and is always trying to take the pictures off his brothers' schedules. But, overall, it has worked very well and the boys really seem to like having them. (My 4-year-old reminds me every morning if I don't get the pictures up right away ...)

HTH!

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#3 of 12 Old 08-08-2009, 04:25 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you so much, Crazycat!!!: : This gives me a good idea on how to start. Do you put any actual time in between the pictures? My son won't be able to understand the time (numbers) but I'd like to incorporate the time (somehow) into the chart. For instance, we're starting with just an afternoon/evening routine. The first pic will be coming home from school, then snack and "Boo's choice" time when he gets to pick a video game, tv, games, books, etc. This will be for a few hours....so how do you incorporate that whole concept of "time" into the chart? TIA

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#4 of 12 Old 08-08-2009, 04:06 PM
 
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I've done similar schedules to CrazyCat but usually have a small envelope for the "all done" icons. I've also usually stuck to vertical for the time schedule and horizontal for the steps involved in a single activity. This way, if I give the horizontal board to my student, he knows that all of those icons will be part of a single activity rather than separate items.

I also usually have a sentence strip that says "Time for _____" with a velcro in the blank space. THis helps them to verbalize what's next.

As for the concept of time, there are a variety of ways to address that. To start, you could have a very small velcro next to each space where you would put something like a colored dot that represents the length, so for example, a yellow dot for a short activity, and a blue dot for a longer activity. Once the child is familiar with numbers, you could put a small square that shows the number of minutes you are going to do the activity for. And then once they are starting to learn actual hours and minutes, you could put up the time the activity will start. They could look like this, in each stage:

(yellow dot) (photo of snack)
(15) (photo of snack)
(4:00) (photo of snack)

Also, at this point, the research shows that photos work better than icons when possible (you can't take a photo of everything, esp. abstract concepts) and that you should print the words at the bottom of the photo (keep them very simple, "Snack" or "Grandma's House").

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#5 of 12 Old 08-10-2009, 12:35 AM
 
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Sorry it has taken me a while to respond. My youngest has been running fevers the past three nights, and parts of the days, and my 4-year-old started vomiting this evening ... ugh.

Honestly, we haven't done much with time yet. I've been lucky to have kiddos who transition fairly easily, so it hasn't been much of an issue. I post our activities in the order we expect to do them and when there is "play time" or "tv time" or something similar, I have usually followed it with something desirable enough that transitioning isn't an issue, or maybe I've just been lucky more than I realize?? My 4-year-old understands time better than his older brother, and is interested in learning how to tell time so we are working a bit on that. For TV so far I've been able to tell him he can watch one program or two if they are shorter movies or something like that. For computer time I tell him he can play x number of games or view a certain number of online videos, or sometimes just say he can play for a few minutes but that such and such activity is coming up very soon. (He loves the Nick Jr and PBS Kids sites and would spend all day on those if I let him.). For my older son we have used a timer in the past, sometimes just setting it for five minutes before we are planning to switch activities. I am hoping to get a visual timer so he can see the time passing more easily but he hasn't had trouble with just a regular kitchen timer so far - he usually transitions nicely when the timer dings and he caught on quickly to what we were using it for.

Once your son can tell time(or even when he is just learning) you can post the time of an event next to the picture. A friend of mine color coded the hands of the clock, and also color coded the numbers on the digital clock time so they matched hours and minutes for color, and if an activity is going to be at a certain time she posts it like that next to the picture, and also on a calendar for that month so he can see it coming up. I haven't gotten that far yet with my schedules and calendars, but my kids are not telling time yet so I haven't worried too much there. I do like the idea, though.

I also like Pikkumyy's suggestions. I think I will try the horizontal for specific activities for my oldest - that might be very helpful for him. There are so many ways to do a schedule and it's fun to read how others do them. I always love new ideas!

Good luck!

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#6 of 12 Old 08-10-2009, 01:57 AM
 
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Visual timers are a very good idea for kids who need to check in and see how much time is left. THey also don't surprise you with a big "ding!" for those who are aurally sensitive.

Another option is to use multiple picture cards for the number of items that they are allowed to do or that time allows. For example, if there is time for 3 books/TV shows/pieces of toast, put up three. Once the three are gone, that's the end of that activity.

I did this for a student who was requesting multiple breaks at school to get out of doing work. Because there was a single icon for "break" that he could access at any time, and it was really important to reinforce his use of it so that he didn't get overwhelmed and have a meltdown, he was overusing it. So we made multiple small icons (for him, it was just the sight word BREAK) and gave him 3 breaks per period (about 45 minutes). Once he used them up, that was it until the next activity. This helped him learned to self-regulate and take breaks when he actually needed them. After that, we went back to a single icon.

Of course this can only be used with an activity that has an actual end. You can't represent 15 minutes of TV where the show is really 30 minutes. But you can represent a single 30 minute show. If, for example, you feel comfortable with the child watching 3 30 minute shows per day, I'd include these on a "free choice" board that is used at play or free time. Then the child gets to choose when to watch the shows but you still control the total amount of time.

OBviously children who understand number concept can just be told how many of the shows, or have a number posted next to the activity. But there are lots of ways to help children understand who don't have that concept yet.

Early intervention specialist and parent consultant since 2002.
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#7 of 12 Old 08-14-2009, 02:05 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you all for the great ideas! I have been slowly trying to look for and take all the necessary pictures. I think I finally have all my supplies. The one thing I'm trying to figure out is how to make cards for transition times like "It's time to slow down your engine" How would I make a visual for that?

I want to start somewhat simple and build on our schedule. I also want to make labels/pics for his drawers so he can see where his clothes go, etc. (Do any of you do this?). Thanks again. Sorry it took so long to write back. It's been a busy week

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#8 of 12 Old 08-15-2009, 02:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mykdsmomy View Post
Thank you all for the great ideas! I have been slowly trying to look for and take all the necessary pictures. I think I finally have all my supplies. The one thing I'm trying to figure out is how to make cards for transition times like "It's time to slow down your engine" How would I make a visual for that?
What type of language do you use to help him calm down? If you use an "engine" simile, you might want to just use a train photo/drawing - maybe pulling into a station? Or something similar. Someone relaxed, that sort of thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mykdsmomy View Post
I want to start somewhat simple and build on our schedule. I also want to make labels/pics for his drawers so he can see where his clothes go, etc. (Do any of you do this?). Thanks again. Sorry it took so long to write back. It's been a busy week
Oh yes. I did this for a student to be able to get out his clothes independently. Each drawer had a different clothing in it and we put a velcro on the front of each drawer with a laminated photo of the type of item inside. And at school, they did this with lots of the school supplies around the room so that he could learn to get the paper, pencils, etc. himself.

Early intervention specialist and parent consultant since 2002.
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#9 of 12 Old 08-16-2009, 12:49 AM
 
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My picture board is quite basic, just 6 velcro dots in a row that I use with pecs-size pictures to show what we're doing. I don't show smaller stuff, but for instance tomorrow morning the line of pictures will be - eat, brush teeth, get dressed, church, lunch, nap. I'll change them while he's napping to show what we're doing for the afternoon - snack, inside playtime, supper, swimming, bed. We DO have another board upstairs for morning and bedtime routines that I don't always use.

For "how does your engine run" our OT suggested using colors. Red for going too fast, yellow for slowing down and green for just right. Keeping it simple and showing it on a verticle or horizontal line. We've not yet incorporated that but it's time to!

Oh. I store the pictures in a folder that I put velcro dots all over the inside of. That way I can find the pictures easily and I keep the ones we don't use often int he folder pocket (dr. visit, haircuts,. etc) and only keep the frequenly used ones on the velcro dots.
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#10 of 12 Old 08-16-2009, 01:30 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Pikkumyy~ We typically say "You need to slow down your engine".....however, after using this term for quite a while (we got it from his school), he asked me the other day "Mommy, what is an engine?" I don't know if he "gets" what we're saying. I like the idea of colored dots to explain time length. The behaviorist suggested getting a timer from Lakeshore that is in a cone shape and has green (lots of time left) Yellow (time to start cleaning up) and Red (all done). I would love to get something like that but it's close to $30.

Bdavis337~ I think the color dots for slowing down are great but I think I need to use them for time so I may have to use something different for when he gets too wound up. He also tends to get a little hyper when we're transitioning so I'm hoping that once the schedule is in place, the transitions will be easier? I hope anyway..

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#11 of 12 Old 08-16-2009, 06:43 PM
 
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It's "funny" how we sometimes choose techniques that we think will really work for our students and then we forget to do something very simple, like explaining what an engine is!

Since they are using it already, and that program is very common in schools, now would be the perfect time for a social story on what an engine is, how it works, what happens when it gets too fast or too slow, and how our bodies can be like engines too. And then how to keep track of your own engine so that it's running right. Then you could introduce the icon right in the book (e.g., "When my engine is running too fast, I need to slow it down. I can _______, _________, or ________. If it's still too high, I can ask a grown-up to help me.")

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