*~SPD support thread for December~* - Page 3 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#61 of 141 Old 12-11-2009, 08:59 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: On a pilgrimage to Canterbury
Posts: 2,708
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ugh, another exhausted mama here today. DS is driving me up the wall today.

First he woke his sister up from her nap because he couldn't stop talking loudly. Then he threw a fit about her being awake. Then he lost his purple bouncy ball while I was making bread. Then he threw a fit about his ball, repeating over and over, "I want my purple ball!" and could not stop spiraling repeating that phrase to tell me where the darn thing was. My house isn't huge, but I'm not looking for a tiny ball all over when he can't freaking tell me what he did with it!

Then we found it upstairs on the bed. I was pointing RIGHT AT IT and he was turning around in circles trying to see it. I finally just picked it up and handed it to him, then he started melting down about the tube he was putting it in when he lost it! :headtowall

And.... I didn't do as well as you, earthmama. I stomped my feet a few times and shouted "I'm SO MAD!!" at the top of my lungs. Then I punched my bread dough for a few minutes. I'm feeling better now. I'm glad I didn't yell at the kids this time.

And DS does not understand that hitting hurts people. In fact, I asked him today how he feels when he hits mommy. He said he feels happy. To be fair, I'm not sure he totally understands what that means because he says the blender makes him happy, and he is terrified of it.

This life is crazy making.
InMediasRes is offline  
#62 of 141 Old 12-11-2009, 09:35 PM
 
umami_mommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: home is where the magic is
Posts: 5,121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by InMediasRes View Post
And DS does not understand that hitting hurts people. In fact, I asked him today how he feels when he hits mommy. He said he feels happy. To be fair, I'm not sure he totally understands what that means because he says the blender makes him happy, and he is terrified of it.
this is pretty normal for toddlers. they have no insight and they have no idea what cause and effect is. none. DD likes to throw things, today she threw a wooden drum and a boot at DS. why? she was playing with him. and she digs his over the top reaction. kinda like when she spits on him.

DD was a really mellow 2 yo. now, as she approaches 3 she is freakin' wacko sometimes. (no sensory issues to speak of here) this morning she asked for an egg for breakfast. i told her we had no eggs and she started screaming like she was being killed and then she hauls off and hits DS.

this is fairly normal toddler behavior as far as i can tell.

"Someone I loved once gave me a box full of darkness. It took me years to understand that this, too, was a gift." -- Mary Olivercoolshine.gif

umami_mommy is offline  
#63 of 141 Old 12-11-2009, 10:44 PM
 
flowmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 4,350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Even my apparently NT 3 yo is quite a handful.

We just came back from a visit to auntie. OMG I just get so worn out at other people's houses with my 6 yo ds: "slow down when you get close to people" "you have to ask before touching" "gentle hands" "quiet voice". I feel like I have to be hypervigilant and there isn't much that exhausts me more than that.

sharing life with | 10 yo ds | 8 yo dd | dh (since 2012)
"I am not what happened to me...I am what I choose to become." ~ Carl Jung
flowmom is offline  
#64 of 141 Old 12-11-2009, 10:47 PM
 
TzippityDoulah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: DC area
Posts: 3,731
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm a little late in dec to sub, but I rarely visit this part of the forum for some reason.

I have 3 kids. the oldest seems pretty average. (he's 9). my daughter (5yrs) has pretty moderate to severe SPD and the baby (who's 7.5 months) is show the same signs of SPD as the 5 yr old. I am SO overwhelmed with dealing with two kids with SPD. I know the baby hasn't been "diagnosed" but I've been down this road before. I don't have money and my area does have EI or anything like that. we're own our own and live paycheck to paycheck so hiring out of pocket for an OT is not an option. however, we're prety well versed in all things SPD by now.

Right now the baby is fussy because he is teethng. He doesn't sleep. the teeth look nowhere near coming in (I see them but it's going to likely be atleast a week before it pops through like the others did). I am SO exhausted. I get NO sleep. I'm hold him constantly and U"m up all ngiht with him. add to that a daughter who's SPD is acting up big time and I am so tired I can't see straight.

any good calming rememdies? homeopathics? anything? I'm desperate for sleep and the idea of letting him just wail in his crib alone seems torturous to him and me! (we don't believe in that anyhow)

what do you guys do???? I'm SOOOO tired!

transtichel.gifMom of three - (2.5 yrs, 7yrs, and 11yrs). Birthing Doula, editor, and wife to my soulmate. I've had a c/s, hospital VBAC, UC and not yet decided what I'll do about this next little one

TzippityDoulah is offline  
#65 of 141 Old 12-11-2009, 10:49 PM
 
TzippityDoulah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: DC area
Posts: 3,731
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
p.s. just wanted to add the teething thing isnt why I think the baby has SPD,.... just incase I gave that impression. that's just what we're dealing with right now. he's got a whole list of other issues that have me concerned. teething is just what's getting to him right now. I know teething pain is normal.

transtichel.gifMom of three - (2.5 yrs, 7yrs, and 11yrs). Birthing Doula, editor, and wife to my soulmate. I've had a c/s, hospital VBAC, UC and not yet decided what I'll do about this next little one

TzippityDoulah is offline  
#66 of 141 Old 12-12-2009, 01:49 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: On a pilgrimage to Canterbury
Posts: 2,708
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh, I know those are normal toddler behaviours. It's hard at this point to know what is normal, what is sensory, and what is the best way to respond. I feel like he will never understand that he can't hit, and the biggest thing is that it seems like hitting and punching and pushing are the ways that he shows affection (since he doesn't hug, kiss, or say "I love you" or any of those things spontaneously).

Anywho, that's just what was on my plate today. I get frustrated with something he does, and all of a sudden I'm back to panicking about ASD and then every little thing he does makes me more and more angry. I just wish I could get to our evaluation and KNOW what's going on.

I guess I have some positive news as well. DH said something to me a while ago that has just stuck with me for the last few days. He said, "You need to be careful to see the person as a person, and not as a diagnosis." I've heard similar things before, but I had a moment today where I could see through the panic and see my beautiful son, my perfect, beautiful son, who is growing into his own person. He was dancing.

I'm feeling like I'm on such a rollercoaster lately.
InMediasRes is offline  
#67 of 141 Old 12-12-2009, 05:03 AM
 
TzippityDoulah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: DC area
Posts: 3,731
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
ok I did a crappy job introducing myself in my first post. my apologies!!! my baby and 5 yr old were both melting down and i had ot just let my husband deal with it for a bit. my nerves were shot so I turned ot MDC for some quick moral support

my daughter (5yrs) is tactile and audio defensive and a sensory seeker. she also has oral defensiveness but it seems to get better with age to some degree. right now she is struggling with RLS (restless leg syndome) or something of the sort. she can't sleep or wear anything but cotton pants and shirt b/c it hurt her skin. she says it feels itchy and crawly and wiggly. having had RLS while pregnant I know just what she means -it's awful!

I have SPD too. of course it was not diagnosed when I was a kid so I was just considered "stupid" and "bad". it hurt me a great deal and I'm still emotionally dealing with the hurt is caused me as a young child.

my two kids seems ot follow my pattern pretty closely. both sensory seeker, tactile and audio defensive. so I totally get it. but in some ways seeking them suffer brings it our in me. does that make any sense? like when she starts stimming i start wanting to also. seeing her wiggle makes me wiggle... and so forth. I find it sometimes hard to cancel out my own sensory issues so I can take care of them. (like my deep aversion to bathing them b/c of the water on my hands *shiver*... but obviously they need a bath lol) and when they get to screaming or screeching i had a particularly hard time dealing with it b/c of my own audio defensiveness. it feels like hot pokers in my ears.

I was wondering if any other moms have more than one kid with SPD, and does anybody here themselves has SPD? how do you handle your own sensory needs AND your kids? I'd love to know

nice to meet you all, btw! I wish I had come here sooner!

transtichel.gifMom of three - (2.5 yrs, 7yrs, and 11yrs). Birthing Doula, editor, and wife to my soulmate. I've had a c/s, hospital VBAC, UC and not yet decided what I'll do about this next little one

TzippityDoulah is offline  
#68 of 141 Old 12-12-2009, 10:48 AM
 
umami_mommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: home is where the magic is
Posts: 5,121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
laura, i am on the run this AM, but just quickly... do you know what your sensory needs are? do you know how to meet them? maybe start there and then start thinking about how to meet your needs so you have less issues dealing with your kids. the more your sensory needs are left unmet, the more difficulties you will have.

DH, who is over responsive (see above post) is much better when he does vigorous exercise a few times a week. supplements help him too.

i would look into a (very small) weighted blanket for your LO. i recommend "peace filled blankets" on ebay. she will make one just the right weight for your LO if you consult with her.

"Someone I loved once gave me a box full of darkness. It took me years to understand that this, too, was a gift." -- Mary Olivercoolshine.gif

umami_mommy is offline  
#69 of 141 Old 12-12-2009, 12:49 PM
 
isign's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 237
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have to say it's so nice to find other mamas who are going through the same thing. I got so excited and told DH that there are other moms who have a kid just like ours.

I'm trying to work on what he eats. I'm trying to limit sugar, which is ok. We don't do sugary cereals, any sweets are homemade and that's not something I do often. I am trying to watch the HFCS but that's so hard. What does everyone else do with their children's diets?
isign is offline  
#70 of 141 Old 12-12-2009, 01:12 PM
 
TzippityDoulah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: DC area
Posts: 3,731
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
isign -

we follow a pretty strict diet. honey is our only sweetner right now. aside from rare circumstances. we are gf/cf/sf and rice is out only grain. (we have a variety of allergies). our diet sorta evolved out of a GAPS/SCD diet mixed with an Elimination diet and here we are. SCD didn't work well for us b/c I'm nursing and needed more carbs amd since I'm fructose intolerant I can't eat dairy I was having hard time finding anything I could eat to keep me going. my milk was ust dropping and LO is solely breastfed still.

transtichel.gifMom of three - (2.5 yrs, 7yrs, and 11yrs). Birthing Doula, editor, and wife to my soulmate. I've had a c/s, hospital VBAC, UC and not yet decided what I'll do about this next little one

TzippityDoulah is offline  
#71 of 141 Old 12-12-2009, 05:35 PM
 
flowmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 4,350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by isign View Post
What does everyone else do with their children's diets?
I don't know if we're doing the right thing, but I try to offer protein food and veggies *before* anything carby at most meals and snacks (even stuff like whole grain bread). If there is a variety of food on their plates they will always eat fruit/carby stuff and leave everything else so I always discreetly serve in stages. I've worked really hard at figuring out what protein foods they like, which now include organic turkey hot dogs, bison pepperoni (nitrate/ite free), raw milk, almonds, pistachios, a limited number of cheeses, organic bacon, roasted organic lamb, organic beef patties. Food is always a struggle...my kids eat very little and have to eat often as a result.

sharing life with | 10 yo ds | 8 yo dd | dh (since 2012)
"I am not what happened to me...I am what I choose to become." ~ Carl Jung
flowmom is offline  
#72 of 141 Old 12-12-2009, 07:28 PM
 
umami_mommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: home is where the magic is
Posts: 5,121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
WOW, that's great! my DS' daily protein consumption consists of raw milk. once in a while he will eat eggs (the white only please, or sometimes scrambled), a hot dog or a plain hamburger. sometimes he will eat grilled cheese sandwiches or cubes of colby-jack cheese when we are out. that's it!

"Someone I loved once gave me a box full of darkness. It took me years to understand that this, too, was a gift." -- Mary Olivercoolshine.gif

umami_mommy is offline  
#73 of 141 Old 12-13-2009, 01:30 PM
 
flowmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 4,350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
if you have time, could you pop over to my chainmail thread?

edited to add, I've also started this thread:

some concerns about sensory OT and my fantasy vision for outdoor therapy

sharing life with | 10 yo ds | 8 yo dd | dh (since 2012)
"I am not what happened to me...I am what I choose to become." ~ Carl Jung
flowmom is offline  
#74 of 141 Old 12-13-2009, 01:48 PM
 
flowmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 4,350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by umami_mommy View Post
WOW, that's great! my DS' daily protein consumption consists of raw milk. once in a while he will eat eggs (the white only please, or sometimes scrambled), a hot dog or a plain hamburger. sometimes he will eat grilled cheese sandwiches or cubes of colby-jack cheese when we are out. that's it!
It's really worth doing some detective work on protein. For example, I figured out that, while an organic hot dog has 7.5 g of protein, a single slice of Silver Hills sprouted grain bread has 6 g of protein! That really surprised me. And it's not really dense bread, it's more like fluffy supermarket-style bread. Of course that's carby. Another way of getting protein into my kids is making popsicles with yoghurt and fruit blended together.

sharing life with | 10 yo ds | 8 yo dd | dh (since 2012)
"I am not what happened to me...I am what I choose to become." ~ Carl Jung
flowmom is offline  
#75 of 141 Old 12-13-2009, 03:28 PM
 
umami_mommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: home is where the magic is
Posts: 5,121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
what's your concern about protein over carbs?

"Someone I loved once gave me a box full of darkness. It took me years to understand that this, too, was a gift." -- Mary Olivercoolshine.gif

umami_mommy is offline  
#76 of 141 Old 12-13-2009, 06:40 PM
 
Piglet68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
Posts: 11,097
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hello everyone. I popped into this thread b/c I've suspected for a while that my 5 year old son has mild SPD and I was curious to hear of others' experiences. It is pretty amazing to hear of parents dealing with the same things.

We've had issues with aggression since DS was around 18 months - 2 years. He would just walk up to kids and push them over, or claw their faces, squeeze their cheeks really hard, pull their hair, etc. It was horrible and I had no idea about SPD back then. He was also speech delayed and did a bit of speech therapy. Despite a very slight "accent" he speaks fine now. He's very bright, knew his alphabet long before he could talk and, at age 5, is reading at around a grade 4 level. People used to treat him like the dumb kid b/c he has always been a big boy, not talkative, etc. I think it's cool that there is so much going on up there and people underestimate him.

When he was 3 we went to a ped specialist who said there was nothing wrong with him that time wouldn't cure. When he was 4 things were looking up and we put him in preschool. Within 2 months his violence was a real problem and the school got someone in to evaluate him. She said she could see no signs of autism spectrum or any other disorder. She did give us some interesting insights into his behaviour (like the exhaustion of him trying to manage in the classroom and how he would eventually "blow"). They got an extra teacher in just for him, to shadow him, and from that point on nobody else got hurt. We homeschool so that was it for him. DH and I joke that if DS were in school he'd be on Ritalin so fast it would make our heads spin.

DS doesn't just randomly hurt kids anymore, but if he's having a bad day he will lash out if angry or frustrated by them, by hitting or throwing things at them. Just last weekend a little kid "invaded DS's personal space" when DS wasn't in the mood to interact with others, so DS pushed him. Unfortunately they were on a play structure and the kid fell about 5 feet. Luckily the ground was springy sawdust and the kid was okay, though obviously very upset. That was rough, but to be fair it's been ages since something like that has happened.With that said these incidences are getting fewer and farther between, though some of it is likely just recognizing what triggers him and staying away from situations that overstimulate him.

So I'm particularly interested to read from others that have kids with aggression issues. DS also can't stand loud sounds like toilets flushing, hand dryers, or the vaccuum. He can't stand having any dirty stuff on his hands (clay, paint, etc). He loves to give very tight hugs (to me; few other people) and big, hard kisses. He also loves to try and climb inside my clothes and he loves touching my breasts especially (he weaned at 3.5 and still misses it, I think, lol). He will strip his clothes off as soon as he's home, does not like to wear socks, and sometimes has issues with labels. Fortunately he can handle clothes and wears them quite readily when we go out, but at home it's all skin, all the time, lol.

Overall I have to say his issues aren't a huge burden on our lives, although there were times a couple years ago when it was very hard but I didn't know about SPD then. Now that I'm learning about it I'm wondering if there are things I should be doing with DS now, even though for the most part our lives are peaceful and he seems to be a happy child. I'm going to check out the website someone linked to.

teapot2.GIF Homeschooling, Homesteading Mama to DD ('02) and DS ('04)  ribbonjigsaw.gif blogging.jpg homeschool.gif

Piglet68 is offline  
#77 of 141 Old 12-13-2009, 07:52 PM
 
TzippityDoulah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: DC area
Posts: 3,731
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ksenia View Post
It's really worth doing some detective work on protein. For example, I figured out that, while an organic hot dog has 7.5 g of protein, a single slice of Silver Hills sprouted grain bread has 6 g of protein! That really surprised me. And it's not really dense bread, it's more like fluffy supermarket-style bread. Of course that's carby. Another way of getting protein into my kids is making popsicles with yoghurt and fruit blended together.
while that is true, it's an entirely different type of protein. (for an example try eating only a piece of bread sometime and see how it makes you feel... and then try the same with a hot dog... then with a hot dog AND a piece of bread.)

same with yogurt and milk... it is certainly great and high in protein but it's form does matter. b/c it's more about protein/carb ratio. a great food would be a hot dog in piece of the high protein bread. it will take less time ot break down and therefore make your blood sugar stable for longer. Cheese however does take longer to digest so a lot of people interchange this for meat protein with good results.

I have blood sugar problems so I have to be very careful about this. I know a lot of places recommend if you're hungry for a snack eat a handful of nuts... but for me that's a blood sugar crash waiting to happen. cheese and nuts would work (most nuts are high in carbs too)

yogurt and fruit is a problem for a lot of people for that same reason, especially if it's a high sugar fruit and lowfat yorgurt. plus saturated and unsaturated fats will be assimilated differently by your body.

since most kids with SPD have blood sugar problems to some degree, I thought i would mention this.


hope that makes sense!

transtichel.gifMom of three - (2.5 yrs, 7yrs, and 11yrs). Birthing Doula, editor, and wife to my soulmate. I've had a c/s, hospital VBAC, UC and not yet decided what I'll do about this next little one

TzippityDoulah is offline  
#78 of 141 Old 12-13-2009, 08:14 PM
 
umami_mommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: home is where the magic is
Posts: 5,121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by HennyPenny View Post
since most kids with SPD have blood sugar problems to some degree, I thought i would mention this.
what do you base this on?

"Someone I loved once gave me a box full of darkness. It took me years to understand that this, too, was a gift." -- Mary Olivercoolshine.gif

umami_mommy is offline  
#79 of 141 Old 12-13-2009, 08:30 PM
 
isign's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 237
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think my brain is spinning? Can anyone point me to some good websites to read? I've ordered The Out of Sync Child, but want to read more. What effect does the florescent lights have vs natural lights?

How does everyone's extended family deal with this? I kind of flipped on my parents today - DS was tired and hungry today, and started screaming. It was around 2:15, after church, passed lunch time, passed time and passed his breaking point. My mother can't tolerate the pitch of his screaming and left the table. She came back when DH had taken DS out of the room. She started to lecture me on how I need to not expect people to accept his screaming and on and on when I snapped and said that if he had something like Downs Syndrome, something someone could see, no one would be on my case about how to discipline him or what to do with him. She told me that I need to remove him from places where he could bother people. This was after the nursery worker took the other kids into the service to listen to the music but not him. I have tried to explain SPD but I get the feeling that they just think I'm making excuses for not disciplining him properly.
isign is offline  
#80 of 141 Old 12-13-2009, 09:53 PM
 
TzippityDoulah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: DC area
Posts: 3,731
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by umami_mommy View Post
what do you base this on?
nothing but my experience with spd kids. i'm sure it's not true across the board, no reason to be defensive -really. just an observation. if it's not for you, just ignore my comment.

transtichel.gifMom of three - (2.5 yrs, 7yrs, and 11yrs). Birthing Doula, editor, and wife to my soulmate. I've had a c/s, hospital VBAC, UC and not yet decided what I'll do about this next little one

TzippityDoulah is offline  
#81 of 141 Old 12-13-2009, 09:53 PM
 
mountainsunshine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: LBI,NJ
Posts: 118
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
(hugs)) insign a screecher is tough to handle sometimes. I have a screecher and man can she hit the high notes! I swear i have sufered some eharing loss from it. That said I would remove my child from a dining room if she was screeching. OUr rule is she gets nothing NOTHING til she stops."I am sorry you need to stop screaming and use words. Calm down first. Want a hug?" YEs she has issues that shouldn't be overlooked,but I feel as that is my problem and not anyone else but DH to deal with. By forcing someone to listen to dd screech I am making it their problem too IMO. Yes empathy is in order from relatives especially but it's not fair to anyone eating a meal to have to deal with my problems. DD would have been removed promptly until she stopped screaming. Shes 2.5 BTW. She is starting to get it. She is not punished for it she is being taught another way to communicate her neeeds. WE have armed her with PECS cards and ASL to communicate. Big hugs are always offered. Time to cool off encouraged. A screech fest at the table never allowed. Same with the grocery store. WE go sit in the car or another quiet place until she stops. This is hard to do. I have 2 other children one who also has SPD/ASD. So yes again I would expect empethy and maybe a helping hand with other children, but I wouldn't subject any one other than DH to the screaming. ((hugs)))) relatives are tough to deal with sometimes.

Sarah
mountainsunshine is offline  
#82 of 141 Old 12-14-2009, 04:32 AM
 
flowmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 4,350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Piglet. I hope that someone has some ideas for you.

HennyPenny, interesting observation about SPD & blood sugar issues. That's a major problem around here. I am definitely having trouble identifying clear patterns around why and when blood sugar crashes happen with ds.

edited to add:
Although it's very inconvenient, I've realized that I have to remove ds from any situation where he's behaving in a way that is seriously disruptive to people (including extended family). Part of it is out of consideration to other people. But the other reason is that I want to protect ds from himself -- to stop him from rehearsing inappropriate behaviours over and over, and to protect him from people resenting him for his behaviours. Removing a child from a situation where s/he is not successfully behaving appropriately is often the kindest choice for everyone involved. And yes, I often feel sorry for myself when I have to do that and end up missing out on things. I find it very stressful to deal with all 4 of the grandparents. Although their intentions are good, they are so distressed by ds that they can't just enjoy him (some people get a real kick out of him!), and one set also is full of judgements about our parenting.

sharing life with | 10 yo ds | 8 yo dd | dh (since 2012)
"I am not what happened to me...I am what I choose to become." ~ Carl Jung
flowmom is offline  
#83 of 141 Old 12-14-2009, 11:01 AM
 
umami_mommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: home is where the magic is
Posts: 5,121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by HennyPenny View Post
nothing but my experience with spd kids. i'm sure it's not true across the board, no reason to be defensive -really. just an observation. if it's not for you, just ignore my comment.
why is asking you what you are basing this belief on defensive? since this has not been in anything i have read nor my experience with DS, i wonder what you based it on, that's all.

do you test your kid's BGL? how do you know kids have blood sugar issues without testing? i am interested and wonder if i should get my blood sugar monitor out and test DS.

"Someone I loved once gave me a box full of darkness. It took me years to understand that this, too, was a gift." -- Mary Olivercoolshine.gif

umami_mommy is offline  
#84 of 141 Old 12-14-2009, 11:12 AM - Thread Starter
 
rainbowmoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 11,138
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have been convinced my DS has salicylate sensitivities. No one has really believed me though up until this point( or even knows what I am talking about half the time for that matter) but I am convinced by keeping a careful journal for 1.5 years..then I am finding now it's COMMON for people with SPD.

here's some info;
http://www.salicylatesensitivity.com/

Blissful Mama to DD-(5), DS-(6) and someone new due in November!
rainbowmoon is offline  
#85 of 141 Old 12-15-2009, 01:49 AM
 
treehugginhippie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 2,011
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just found this thread! Just got DD2 (15 mo) evaluated by Early Steps. She has gross motor delays and sensory issues. She will start therapy 1-2 x's a week for both. I knew she had water sensory issues but didn't realize how many other sensory issues she really had (makes more sense now when I look back at her life from birth).

I know I have my own sensory issues as an adult. I'm am/was soooo much a believer in leaving children to grow on their own (like crawling when they're ready, getting used to water more as they get older) w/out anyone's help but this has really thrown me for a loop.

My questions are: what causes this? Like it seems there are sooooo many children w/ sensory issues. Is it diet related? Also, does therapy really help? Are there any adults here who had therapy as children who have overcome their sensory issues? I'm having a hard time w/ this as no one in my circle of AP friends can relate at all esp w/ even having her evaluated.

Thanks in advance!

Tina - mama to DD1 10yrs, DD2 5.5 yrs and DD3 22 mo and wifey to DH.
treehugginhippie is offline  
#86 of 141 Old 12-15-2009, 02:02 AM
 
TzippityDoulah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: DC area
Posts: 3,731
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Umami-
I'm sorry, I misread your comment as defensive! oops! (I just came over from the religion forum where everyone is often super defensive lol! I've just learned to try to be calm about things if people get hyper with each other ykwim?)

ok no really my only support with that is having 2 kids with SPD, having it myself and reading through stuff on here and other sites. it just seems this is a common trigger for "episodes".

I never got tested b/c I don't believe you test very well. the only tests I know of are the one you force down a bunch of sugar, or you fast for long periods of time - both are not real life scenarios. (there is a lot of dispute over these types of tests if they actually give any insight at all on blood sugar)

I guess I just started recognizing the same symptoms in my kids and I have and eventually realized it was blood sugar related. I've always had to be careful with my diet so it's not hard for me to be the same with theirs. we don't go to a traditional pediatrician, we see an Applied Kneisiologist Chiropractor so they test using muscle testing mainly. it's very different than western tests.

sorry if that's not much help!

transtichel.gifMom of three - (2.5 yrs, 7yrs, and 11yrs). Birthing Doula, editor, and wife to my soulmate. I've had a c/s, hospital VBAC, UC and not yet decided what I'll do about this next little one

TzippityDoulah is offline  
#87 of 141 Old 12-15-2009, 02:03 AM
 
TzippityDoulah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: DC area
Posts: 3,731
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
rainbowmoon - I have been suspicious of this in my daughter too. I recently took her off of most of them to see... I'm not sure yet of the outcome.

transtichel.gifMom of three - (2.5 yrs, 7yrs, and 11yrs). Birthing Doula, editor, and wife to my soulmate. I've had a c/s, hospital VBAC, UC and not yet decided what I'll do about this next little one

TzippityDoulah is offline  
#88 of 141 Old 12-15-2009, 11:33 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: On a pilgrimage to Canterbury
Posts: 2,708
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
...and moving into depression (which he's prone to anyway). We had yet another outing that we had to end abruptly because of DS being overstimulated. He doesn't enjoy anything. DH just said the whole way home, "I want to be able to show my son new things, but he just falls apart every time." DS cannot handle any situation, even familiar ones, where there are other kids that might get into his space. DH is a major extrovert, and going out and doing things is how he likes to run his life, so he's finally feeling affected enough that he thinks something isn't right.

Does anyone follow the philosophy that sensory kids need to practice social situations or whatever over and over until they feel comfortable with it? We recently moved. We were in a playgroup in CA every Fri and it seemed like DS handled other kids a lot better when he was around them on a regular basis. I can't say that playgroup was fun for him, but at least he was getting exposure. Now I'm not sure. Every time another kid approaches him, he panics. We are also wondering if he's suffering some general anxiety from so much upheaval in his life at one time (new sister, moving to a new state). Whatever it is, DH is a "let's DO something" person and is aching to make some major changes to find something to "fix" it. I keep telling him that major changes all at once are going to make it worse, but whatever. That's another fight for another day, I guess.

So now I have a very needy kid who can't get out his energy enough during the day, and a depressed DH who can't stand to be around his son. Joy.

I guess some good will come out of it, because DH is jumping at the idea of therapy all of a sudden. We have an appointment with a dev ped on Feb 2, but we're thinking taking an OT report with us might be useful, so we're going to do an OT eval and possibly a child therapist for anxiety. Are we going about this the right way? I have no idea what I need to have with us when we go to the dev ped, or if that is even the right route to go.

Sigh.
InMediasRes is offline  
#89 of 141 Old 12-15-2009, 12:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
rainbowmoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 11,138
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
InMediasRes- I think your son is very young yet and will grow out of this. (mine did anyway) I would avoid the situations that overstimulate him and find ones he can actually enjoy. You DH will have his whole childhood to show him things. I know it is hard though.

Also something to look at is transitions. Something some sensory kids are very bad at adjusting to. (this is the way it was with my DS anyway and everything was a battle for a good 2 years I'd say)..

Something that worked for him is making the transition a game. (he likes to race so we' make it a "get mark, get set, go.." thing) worked like a CHARM after fighting with him for a year to get dressed multiple times a day!

My DS also is one who HAS to be outside for an insane amount of time every day or he goes nuts. It does not matter if there is snow on the ground or if it is 110 degrees. He's just that kind of kid.

I know it's winter but can you guys take him somewhere to burn off energy? swimming? kids gym? or maybe you could do an indoor obstacle course..we had a trampoline for inside for awhile that was a lifesaver (they are about $50 IIRC)

Blissful Mama to DD-(5), DS-(6) and someone new due in November!
rainbowmoon is offline  
#90 of 141 Old 12-15-2009, 01:58 PM
 
flowmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 4,350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
InMediaRes, we have to do outings every day because ds gets cabin fever, BUT we also deal with overstimulation. Nature outings are the best option for us, and like the PP, it's an all-weather kinda deal (we live in the PNW in Canada). Avoiding kid-focused spaces really works best for us because of overstimulation. Sometimes we go to the Aquarium or a museum when we know there won't be too many children there. It's too stressful for all of us. I don't think that children under 5 need to be with their peers unless it's really working for them -- read Gordon Neufeld if you want more info on that. Some of their developmental stages are really rough, and if you add sensory stuff on top of that, it gets hard. Now that ds is 6, we have some situations with other kids that work for ds -- usually it has to be somewhat structured, not a free-for-all (playgrounds, festivals, informal groups haven't worked well). It's hard when your temperament doesn't match your child's. I'm an introvert and it it's driving me batty to have 2 young children talking at me all.day.long.

sharing life with | 10 yo ds | 8 yo dd | dh (since 2012)
"I am not what happened to me...I am what I choose to become." ~ Carl Jung
flowmom is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off