Red flags of SPD? - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 11 Old 02-21-2010, 03:02 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi everyone I was speaking to a friend of mine, both of her sons (8 months & 35 months) have been diagnosed with SPD and I was sharing some concerns of mine. She says it sounds textbook.

I think, personally, that I have undiagnosed SPD (and it does effect the way I function, but it is manageable). I am just shy of 20 years old, and I don't know what do do about it (regarding occupational therapy, etc.), if anyone has info on that please chime in

Anyways, back to DD..
She's 26 months old, and here is some of what I had sent to my friend regarding DDs behaviors (this started as a convo about how artificial colors and high fructose corn syrup make DD bonkers, so to speak).

I'm not totally sure she has it, it's really hard to tell because she's so young, and I'm no expert ;] I think she's possibly just really sensitive to food additives (or they possibly make it more pronounced). That gluten sensitivity she had when she was a baby got better (a LOT better) but she still gets a bit whacky if she has gluten, which is very hard to cut out. I however have done tons of those online SPD checklists and holy cow do I fit the profile. But back to N... she's very fidgety, she's constantly picking at herself, for one. If so much as one little tag, seam, whatever is there, she's itching and fidgeting with it. She has a bunch of scratches and scabs all over her upper back (under her neck) and sides because of this. She flips out if water touches her head or face, even a little when brusing teeth (imagine baths!). She's really hard to get on a wake/rest/awake schedule. She's crazy clumsy (and I know I am as well). When she has a dirty diaper she flips, and the doctor we took her to (we thought it was a UTI, that's how extreme she reacts) mentioned that it could be behavoiral or a sensory issue. She totally freaks out when she's dirty and cannot eat messy foods (spaghetti with sauce) for that reason. For awhile she resisted anything mushy (yogurt, applesauce) and was on finger foods by 7.5-8mos old because of it. Only recently has she started eating softer foods, like mashed potatoes. She gets especially clingy with any one given person and then has separation anxiety when she has to leave them (even someone she barely knows, such as a friend of C's [note, C is my 15 year old SIL). Something else is that she NEEDS a heavy blanket to sleep. I do this as well, it will be 90 degrees and I have to have a heavy blanket on top of me. Anywho.. sorry for the book but those are just some concerns. We have a new doctor now and I plan on discussing these issues with her... our old doc sort of disregarded me, as most docs do because of my age. Thanks for reading


So, fellow MDCers.. what do you think? Are these red flags? She had her doc refer her son to early intervention and they determined that he had SPD as well as his brother (dxed later). She recommended me to get a referral from our doctor.. we see her on Tuesday for DD2's 2 month checkup, so we shall see. Anyways, like I said- what do you think?

eta: totally forgot a big one. she's sensitive to temp.. when something is the slightest bit warm she flips and screams "it's HOTT!", even a warm bath. Even if it is just slightly above room temperature. Also, she's shy around strangers.

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#2 of 11 Old 02-21-2010, 03:15 PM
 
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I think all the things that you listed are red flags for SPD.

According to what you wrote she's
  • extremely sensitive to tags and seams
  • she scratches herself until she bleeds because of the discomfort (our dd does this)
  • extremely scared of water on her face
  • highly irregular in terms of sleeping
  • she requires a heavy weight on her to sleep
  • very clumsy
  • extremely sensitive to food textures
  • freaks out with diaper changes (a highly sensory activity if there ever was one)
  • freaks out with messy foods
  • extremely sensitive to temperatures
I'm not sure the separation anxiety/shyness is related to SPD. That could just be her personality. It's hard for me to judge because my SPD kid had early and long lasting separation anxiety, but he was never comfortable around anyone other than mom, dad and a few select teachers at daycare. He was also selectively mute in many situations.

It sounds to me like these sensitivities are restricting her daily activities and diet.

I would make a separate appointment for your older daughter to talk to the doc about this.You can bring it up during dd2's appointment, but they aren't really going to be prepared to deal with it then.

What you want to do when you see the doctor is bring a list (written out) of the observations that you've made about how she reacts to sensory stuff. In addition, make sure you note how it affects her daily life. Some doctors don't 'believe' in SPD as it's not in the official Diagnostic and Statistic Manual (DSM-IV). So, you may have to focus on how her symptoms are restricting her ability to explore the world and learn like a toddler should.

Oh, one last thought -- you can (and probably should) contact Early Intervention services in your local area. They are free (through the school district) and will assess your dd.

Good luck!

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#3 of 11 Old 02-21-2010, 05:08 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you soooo much! She is also selectively mute in certain situations, she's usually talking your ear off though. She goes to a playgroup once a week and every time she rarely speaks, unless she's asking the teacher/coordinator for a particular colored crayon (she's also drawn to certain colors, like.. addictively. It's strange)

My friend gave me the link to the DHS early intervention, but you need a referral. She told me that the doctors HAVE to give it to you, so we'll see. Thanks again for the response

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#4 of 11 Old 02-22-2010, 04:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LynnS6 View Post
Oh, one last thought -- you can (and probably should) contact Early Intervention services in your local area. They are free (through the school district) and will assess your dd.

Good luck!
There is a bit of a time crunch with this, too, because most EI stuff (free) is easier to get before 3yo. Just a thought. It can't hurt, and it sure is worth it to get something going if it's deemed necessary.

Wendy ~ mom to VeeGee (6/05), who has PRS, Apraxia, SPD, VPI, a G-Tube, 14q duplication, and is a delightful little pistol! I'm an English professor and a writer.
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#5 of 11 Old 02-22-2010, 06:54 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Correct. It's only available from 0-3yrs.

Since DD1 is showing signs in my mind, should I see if they should check out DD2? She's 2 months old today. How early is too early for early intervention?

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#6 of 11 Old 02-23-2010, 09:59 AM
 
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Originally Posted by WindyCityMom View Post
Correct. It's only available from 0-3yrs.

Since DD1 is showing signs in my mind, should I see if they should check out DD2? She's 2 months old today. How early is too early for early intervention?
That's a little too young I would imagine, though if the issues are significant perhaps it wouldn't hurt. It seems to me that I've heard 18 mos. is about the time they start getting seriously concerned about dx, and even then, SPD is a challenge to nail down. Lots of practitioners are reluctant to label until way older (I've heard up to 5-6 years old).

Wendy ~ mom to VeeGee (6/05), who has PRS, Apraxia, SPD, VPI, a G-Tube, 14q duplication, and is a delightful little pistol! I'm an English professor and a writer.
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#7 of 11 Old 02-23-2010, 10:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnS6 View Post
  • extremely scared of water on her face
  • highly irregular in terms of sleeping
  • she requires a heavy weight on her to sleep
  • very clumsy
  • freaks out with messy foods
  • extremely sensitive to temperatures
omg my ds makes me pile all the pillows and blankets on him in order to sleep, he calls it building a house, I thought we were the only ones, and he hates condiments and won't eat a food that has any sort of gravy, or anything on it and if he touches it all hell breaks loose, he also panics when i get water on his face in the bath. I never thought about him beig SPD though

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#8 of 11 Old 02-23-2010, 09:50 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks My friend's son is 8mos, not sure when they dxed him but I'm sure you're right about that

I spoke to the doctor at My DD2s appt today, and she said to make an appt for DD1 with the "Healthy Hands Specialist" to do the preliminary evaluation to see if early intervention would be deemed necessary (but even then, early intervention would be a secondary evaluation).

I'm curious- what exactly do they do at an evaluation? Especially if it is one in a doctor's office- do you think they'd just address my concerns? I'm a bit confused but am still going to go ahead and schedule the appointment.

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#9 of 11 Old 02-24-2010, 01:15 AM
 
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They will ask you questions, interact w/your dd, try some activities w/her, etc. It's really not a difficult appt, just long and detailed. There are usually pre-made questionaires for the parents/caregivers.

I can't remember the rest anymore...but they are looking for issues w/eating or foods, touching things, textures, noises, etc, etc.

I want to add that ds1 who has SPD (and other issues that we are evaluating now plus physical health problems) was also super reactive to medications, food dyes, and corn syrup early on. He's probably the only kid our ped has ever seen who actually reacted psychotically to the steroids we had to give him for croup! We recently gave the GFCG diet a try, and many of his sensory issues got better within days!!! As tough as it can be, it's definitely worth it. Within days of blowing the diet, he was back to having major issues.

GL!

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#10 of 11 Old 02-24-2010, 02:57 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you!

As I had mentioned, DD had major issues with gluten as a baby- they tested her a little but didn't do a full workup- but I KNOW she's sensitive to gluten.

I'm going to schedule that appointment tomorrow, I really hope that they can tell if she needs further evaluation or not.. today, when changing her, I noticed that she has scratches and scabs down to her knees on both thighs As well as on her neck... aside from the food issues and her being a very picky eater due to that.. her harming herself is a major concern of mine.

Thanks again, everyone, I'll update after we see the Healthy Hands specialist

rainbow1284.gif Mama to DD1 (6) DD2 (4) and DD3 (1)
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#11 of 11 Old 02-24-2010, 11:39 AM
 
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One thing I've found helpful when filling out the questionnaires that they have given us for SPD, is to complete them WITH my dh, because he has some different perceptions of what she does/doesn't do, and we're able to talk about them, refine the answers so that they're most helpful to the evaluators. I know that I'm much more likely to say "yes, she does do that," than dh is. Part of that is the ridiculous amounts of research that I do, which sometimes, I think, makes me look harder at her than is really helpful, does that make sense. It's good to get a couple of perspectives to kind of average the responses. You can always write addendum or notes or whatever, and you'll be able to talk and explain things to the evaluators.

Wendy ~ mom to VeeGee (6/05), who has PRS, Apraxia, SPD, VPI, a G-Tube, 14q duplication, and is a delightful little pistol! I'm an English professor and a writer.
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