should I fight the school? *UPDATE* - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#31 of 48 Old 09-11-2010, 10:50 PM - Thread Starter
 
dirtyhipegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Yorktown VA
Posts: 336
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
[QUOTE=khaoskat;15832925]With the school season already started, they may have to contact schools to see what openings they have, and what services they would have immediately available to assist her.

You may not always get to pick what school, especially when you are moving into the school district after enrollment is over with, you are sort of stuck with what is available and has room.

I know when we transitioned from EI to preschool, we couldn't just pick any school/time. We had to pick from what available openings there were.[/QUOTE

They did find a school that can take her. We were supposed to go meet with them next week. The school is not rated very well, but I don't want to judge it solely on that.

The vice principal of our homeschool met with me last week and shut the door to her office and did tell me that I could fight it if I wanted to and request an aide that would be with her on the stairs. The only reason aside from the stairs that I am even thinking of not doing that is because the kindergarten teacher is for lack of a better word an idiot. She put my dd in the corner and didn't let her participate with the other kids. She seemed unwilling to learn about how to deal with TBI.

After much thought and talking with everyone, the school definitely messed up and didn't give us a fair shot. It is one of the best elementary schools in Va. It is so hard to know what's best for dd. I don't want to fight for it just because the school is right down the road and I can walk her and it's convenient for me.

Eating is an agricultural act.  -Wendell Berry

dirtyhipegirl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#32 of 48 Old 09-11-2010, 10:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
dirtyhipegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Yorktown VA
Posts: 336
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by stik View Post
This is a PUBLIC school, and it needs to be open to the public. That means they cannot exclude children with disabilities. Other posters have already said that it's completely inappropriate for the school to exclude a student who needs help on the stairs when they offer a program that is otherwise completely appropriate for the student. And someone else already said that they cannot write an IEP based on financial concerns. What they should be doing here is calling for an SST and evaluating your dd to see what services she needs to help her succeed in this setting. Sending a child to a different school for services is appropriate only in a very limited number of cases.

Schools have to deal with students who have mobility issues all the time. In the course of this year, at least a couple students will wind up on crutches and need help on the stairs. I'm furious that any school would act as though a student with TBI was the first *ever* to walk through their doors for whom mobility was an issue. If there is an IEP or 504 plan in place, they cannot move her and must provide services. If there is no plan, then legally speaking your dd has no special needs the school cannot meet and there is no justification for the transfer.

If you want your dd to stay at your neighborhood school, it should not be a big issue to keep her there. Evaluating her for an IEP or 504 is the first step. The school's response to this situation is utterly ridiculous. Please do not hesitate to unleash your mama bear on the school administration.
Thank You for the words of wisdom

Eating is an agricultural act.  -Wendell Berry

dirtyhipegirl is offline  
#33 of 48 Old 09-12-2010, 01:23 AM
Banned
 
stik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,860
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I talked with my dh about this - he's done work on vocational rehabilitation grants, and is more familiar with disability law than I am.

He informs me that only ONE building in the entire US is exempt from ADA accessibility requirements because of its age - the US capitol building. Schools cannot be "grandfathered" out of the obligation to make themselves accessible if there is need. It doesn't matter how historic the building is. Schools have been sued for this, and it has been repeatedly and consistently upheld by the courts.

My dh says it sounds like the school is trying to run roughshod over your dd's rights. If you live in the district and in the area served by the school, the school has an obligation to provide services and they *cannot* pick another school for a student, especially not over the parents' wishes. He recommends that you contact a disability rights center. I don't know where you are - you can google for one in your state.

As a public school teacher, I feel strongly that public schools have a job to do, and that job depends on schools being inclusive and providing students with appropriate services. As described, your dd's school is ignoring a number of laws and ethical standards. It sounds like they may be weeding their student body to try to improve their financial bottom line and NCLB testing stats. I don't have enough info to say for sure, but if the staff is so inexperienced with disabilities that they can't figure out how to have all members of a class sit together safely outside of a classroom, that's pretty suspicious. Weeding students to preserve the budget and improve the test scores is a form of fraud. No wonder the nurse is offering to help you fight. The school should not be permitted to get away with this.

Moving a student out of their neighborhood school places a number of burdens on the student and the student's family. The commute is longer. It's harder to arrange activities with peers from school. It's harder for the family to participate in extracurricular activities. It's harder for parents to be involved in their child's classroom. It isolates the student and family from the neighborhood community as well. Please do not allow your child to be transferred without thoroughly researching your legal rights and considering the social and academic impacts of the move. I usually don't think suing public schools is a good move, but you might find it helpful to inform the school that you think your rights are being violated and are consulting a disability rights center and/or a lawyer. If the school has told you that they cannot meet your dd's needs, you will have an extraordinarily strong case, especially if all she needs is assistance on the stairs. Who do they think they are? It's not 1972 anymore. They can't get away with this. The vice principal told you to fight - she knows when her school is in the wrong. You should fight.

ETA: my dh adds - you shouldn't even have to pay for a lawyer. Explain the situation to your local disability law center and they will lean on the school for you, pro bono. The school is legally obligated to provide reasonable accommodations to students with disabilities. In your case, this might be moving a kindergarten classroom to the same floor as the cafeteria so your dd does not have to negotiate stairs, providing an aide to help your dd on the stairs (this could be a nurse or an administrator who meets the class at the stairs at the appropriate times each day - they don't even have to hire someone new), or building an elevator. The cost is immaterial - the school is obligated to accommodate.
stik is offline  
#34 of 48 Old 09-12-2010, 10:06 AM - Thread Starter
 
dirtyhipegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Yorktown VA
Posts: 336
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by stik View Post
I talked with my dh about this - he's done work on vocational rehabilitation grants, and is more familiar with disability law than I am.

He informs me that only ONE building in the entire US is exempt from ADA accessibility requirements because of its age - the US capitol building. Schools cannot be "grandfathered" out of the obligation to make themselves accessible if there is need. It doesn't matter how historic the building is. Schools have been sued for this, and it has been repeatedly and consistently upheld by the courts.

My dh says it sounds like the school is trying to run roughshod over your dd's rights. If you live in the district and in the area served by the school, the school has an obligation to provide services and they *cannot* pick another school for a student, especially not over the parents' wishes. He recommends that you contact a disability rights center. I don't know where you are - you can google for one in your state.

As a public school teacher, I feel strongly that public schools have a job to do, and that job depends on schools being inclusive and providing students with appropriate services. As described, your dd's school is ignoring a number of laws and ethical standards. It sounds like they may be weeding their student body to try to improve their financial bottom line and NCLB testing stats. I don't have enough info to say for sure, but if the staff is so inexperienced with disabilities that they can't figure out how to have all members of a class sit together safely outside of a classroom, that's pretty suspicious. Weeding students to preserve the budget and improve the test scores is a form of fraud. No wonder the nurse is offering to help you fight. The school should not be permitted to get away with this.

Moving a student out of their neighborhood school places a number of burdens on the student and the student's family. The commute is longer. It's harder to arrange activities with peers from school. It's harder for the family to participate in extracurricular activities. It's harder for parents to be involved in their child's classroom. It isolates the student and family from the neighborhood community as well. Please do not allow your child to be transferred without thoroughly researching your legal rights and considering the social and academic impacts of the move. I usually don't think suing public schools is a good move, but you might find it helpful to inform the school that you think your rights are being violated and are consulting a disability rights center and/or a lawyer. If the school has told you that they cannot meet your dd's needs, you will have an extraordinarily strong case, especially if all she needs is assistance on the stairs. Who do they think they are? It's not 1972 anymore. They can't get away with this. The vice principal told you to fight - she knows when her school is in the wrong. You should fight.

ETA: my dh adds - you shouldn't even have to pay for a lawyer. Explain the situation to your local disability law center and they will lean on the school for you, pro bono. The school is legally obligated to provide reasonable accommodations to students with disabilities. In your case, this might be moving a kindergarten classroom to the same floor as the cafeteria so your dd does not have to negotiate stairs, providing an aide to help your dd on the stairs (this could be a nurse or an administrator who meets the class at the stairs at the appropriate times each day - they don't even have to hire someone new), or building an elevator. The cost is immaterial - the school is obligated to accommodate.
Thank you so much to you and your dh. This info is helpful. The more I think about it I think they are probably trying to weed us out so that their "perfect" school isn't affected, which pisses me off to no end. The Special needs over our district made it seem as though we had no choices in this matter. I'm going to deal with him tomorrow.

Eating is an agricultural act.  -Wendell Berry

dirtyhipegirl is offline  
#35 of 48 Old 09-12-2010, 04:01 PM
Banned
 
stik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,860
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Dirtyhipegirl, I'm so glad the info is helpful. Your story made my dh turn a funny shade of purple.

I wanted to add, for the general information of people in the thread whose schools seem to be making a lot of excuses:

Quote:
Many students in a special education are sent away from home schools for specific programs if the 'home school' does not meet their needs. For example---a self contained classroom, specialized program (Hard of Hearing teacher), Gifted programming, or other reasons. Usually the only requirement is that the district provide transportation....they are meeting the need for a free and appropriate education.
This is only true if the neighborhood school is not the least restrictive environment. Students sometimes are sent to other schools within a district for special programs even when their neighborhood school is the LRE, but this can only be done with the parents' consent. For example, my state has special schools for the deaf and blind. However, the school I work at must provide reasonable accommodations to deaf and blind students who choose to attend - we have a deaf student who goes to classes with a translator, for example.

Schools can move students if they have no space. However, there are limits on the extent to which they can do this. Districts can redraw the boundaries that schools serve to try to balance out populations, but they have to do it during the summer. If they are completely maxed out (by the fire code), they can cap enrollment and send students to other schools. This should only affect students who try to enroll during the school year, not students whose families met enrollment deadlines. They cannot announce that they simply don't have room for a disabled student while accepting other students.

Quote:
You may not always get to pick what school, especially when you are moving into the school district after enrollment is over with, you are sort of stuck with what is available and has room.

I know when we transitioned from EI to preschool, we couldn't just pick any school/time. We had to pick from what available openings there were.
This is true for most preschools, because preschools are not public schools. It is not true for public schools. Regardless of when you move in, unless the school is in the extremely rare position of enrollment exceeding permitted occupancy of the building per the fire code, they have to serve the children who live in their assigned area. This is why you hear about schools hiring teachers in October and throwing up partitions to create classrooms in corners of the gymnasium, or making room for small classes by clearing out vaguely large-ish storage closets.

Quote:
If it is like my kids old elementary school, it could be historic and be exempt from accessibility regulations...
Unless your children are attending school in the US capitol building, the school is not exempt from accessibility regulations.

Quote:
I had no way to get to the office with my kids, because I had one asleep in a sling and one in a stroller. You couldn't get more than 5 feet into the building without encountering stairs to go anywhere.

The response was basically that I just needed to carry the stroller up the stairs (yes, while I was carrying a 30+ pound sleeping toddler in a sling) to the office to unregister my son.

They have no elevators, or ramps. When questions about what the school would do if they had a child in a wheel chair, I was told they would send that child to another school in the district.
. . . and they would risk being sued, and they would lose because they are clearly in violation of the ADA. Installing ramps is much less expensive than going to court in an attempt to defend their illegal actions and losing. The school should look into that. It's not that uncommon for a child to be in a serious accident in mid-school year and need to use a wheelchair for a period of time. They can't ship that kid to another district just because they don't want to renovate. I bet they've renovated their cafeteria, bathrooms, and library since their antique school was built. Time to renovate some entrances.
stik is offline  
#36 of 48 Old 09-12-2010, 10:06 PM
 
aslyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 517
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I dont really have advice but that teacher is *$@!!*.

I would fight it and have her happy rear end fired for discrmination! not wanting to be liable my left foot??!! wether a kid is sn or not, EVERY staff member in that school building is liable for every kid..That is part of their jobs.

I am so angry just reading this thread, and so sorry for your dd..if it were me I'd fight them until their were kissing my feet and begging me to keep her there.

"I'd rather be hated for who I am than loved for who I am not."- Kurt Cobain
aslyn is offline  
#37 of 48 Old 09-14-2010, 03:03 PM - Thread Starter
 
dirtyhipegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Yorktown VA
Posts: 336
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So yesterday I met with the special needs coordinator for our city. He told me that I would not be able to get an aide for dd if I requested one. He said that the school is not required to provide her an aide, so if I sent her there she may or may not fall down the stairs. Then he said again that I could not choose what other school I wanted. They ended up choosing a school not to far away. He did admit to me that it was chosen on population more than anything. I met with the principal of the new school and she actually listened to all my concerns and seemed like she really cared, which is more than other school ever did. She said the teacher she wants to place dd with is very loving, and caring, again way different than the other school. It's not the "best" school in town, but I don't know how well I trust those ratings after this experience seeing as which the school that screwed us is supposed to be the best in town. So, yes I know the school has screwed us over, however, as much as I want to fight these people, I have to think about what's best for dd. I don't want her somewhere she is not wanted and not going to be watched closely. I just want her to be able to feel normal again, and enjoy kindergarden. Thank you for you words of wisdom.

Eating is an agricultural act.  -Wendell Berry

dirtyhipegirl is offline  
#38 of 48 Old 09-14-2010, 05:10 PM
Banned
 
stik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,860
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
As much as I want to see the administrators at your old school suffer and repent, it sounds like you've made the best decision for your dd. You may find that an IEP or 504 is necessary to get your dd all the help she needs, but a more caring environment is better than a fight to keep her in a classroom with a terrible teacher. I hope she has a smooth transition and a wonderful year at her new school.
stik is offline  
#39 of 48 Old 09-14-2010, 06:46 PM
 
aslyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 517
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I am glad that you found a solution that works..Is there any way you can file a complaint to your state board or something about the way you were treated? It just seems there has to be some recourse for parents or they are going to treat other kids this way.

"I'd rather be hated for who I am than loved for who I am not."- Kurt Cobain
aslyn is offline  
#40 of 48 Old 09-14-2010, 07:16 PM - Thread Starter
 
dirtyhipegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Yorktown VA
Posts: 336
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by aslyn View Post
I am glad that you found a solution that works..Is there any way you can file a complaint to your state board or something about the way you were treated? It just seems there has to be some recourse for parents or they are going to treat other kids this way.
We are Air Force so I let the special needs coordinator at our base know. She wants to take action against them also. The base we are at has many special needs children so I asked her to warn incoming special needs parents. If we would have known we would not have moved in our neighborhood. As much as I hate being wronged and would love to show them they can't do this to people, I have to think about what's best for dd.

Eating is an agricultural act.  -Wendell Berry

dirtyhipegirl is offline  
#41 of 48 Old 09-14-2010, 07:31 PM
 
aslyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 517
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtyhipegirl View Post
We are Air Force so I let the special needs coordinator at our base know. She wants to take action against them also. The base we are at has many special needs children so I asked her to warn incoming special needs parents. If we would have known we would not have moved in our neighborhood. As much as I hate being wronged and would love to show them they can't do this to people, I have to think about what's best for dd.
I totaly understand! I hope your dd loves the new school

I just hate the fact they can treat people like this-I hope the coordinator kicks some butts in the right direction

"I'd rather be hated for who I am than loved for who I am not."- Kurt Cobain
aslyn is offline  
#42 of 48 Old 09-14-2010, 07:36 PM
 
LynnS6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pacific NW longing for the Midwest
Posts: 12,446
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I'm glad you've found a solution that works, and a school that seems like they'll care for your daughter. I'm also glad that you took it up with your AF resources. Maybe that will bring about some change!

Just a quick note of hope about the school you've been placed in. The school our kids attend is not "the best" on paper. It's low income (85% of the kids are on free or reduced lunch), with a high population of ESL students (65% don't speak English when they arrive). About half of the parents in our middle class neighborhood transfer their kids to other schools to avoid this one. They're missing out on a lot. The teachers are fantastic. They do real differentiation so that kids who are at the same level are working together -- those that need more help are getting more help. They re-arrange the kids every 6-10 weeks so that if you've made progress (or slipped), you get moved accordingly. This school has virtually no bullying. They have the money (from Title I funds) for a full time counselor. She goes into the classrooms once a week and they work on social skills, rules, etc. Other, richer, schools have much more of a problem with bullying and pushy parents.

Let's hope that your new school is like ours!

Lynnteapot2.GIF, academicreading.gif,geek.gif wife, WOHM  to T jog.gif(4/01) and M whistling.gif (5/04)
LynnS6 is offline  
#43 of 48 Old 09-14-2010, 08:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
dirtyhipegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Yorktown VA
Posts: 336
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnS6 View Post
I'm glad you've found a solution that works, and a school that seems like they'll care for your daughter. I'm also glad that you took it up with your AF resources. Maybe that will bring about some change!

Just a quick note of hope about the school you've been placed in. The school our kids attend is not "the best" on paper. It's low income (85% of the kids are on free or reduced lunch), with a high population of ESL students (65% don't speak English when they arrive). About half of the parents in our middle class neighborhood transfer their kids to other schools to avoid this one. They're missing out on a lot. The teachers are fantastic. They do real differentiation so that kids who are at the same level are working together -- those that need more help are getting more help. They re-arrange the kids every 6-10 weeks so that if you've made progress (or slipped), you get moved accordingly. This school has virtually no bullying. They have the money (from Title I funds) for a full time counselor. She goes into the classrooms once a week and they work on social skills, rules, etc. Other, richer, schools have much more of a problem with bullying and pushy parents.

Let's hope that your new school is like ours!


Thanks for sharing this, it's encouraging. When I went in to talk to the new teacher she showed me some really cool things she has done for a some of the students that don't speak English very well. She seemed like she passionate about her job and the best way to teach dd. Which is exactly what my dd needs. I really think a lot of the talk of "bad" school "good" school has to do with economic and race issues. I'm glad you had a good experience. I hope we do as well.

Eating is an agricultural act.  -Wendell Berry

dirtyhipegirl is offline  
#44 of 48 Old 09-15-2010, 02:54 AM
 
shelbean91's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 9,290
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm glad things have worked out. However, be aware that district special needs coordinators frequently LIE to get what they want. They will flat out LIE about what you will and won't get until you threaten a lawsuit or get someone else in there to fight with you. Unfortunately, I've seen it happen. Just keep that in the back of your mind for future school years.

From what you've said, you are making the best decision, but it's not right that you had to. they should just do what they're supposed to. I will fight to the ends of the earth for my boys (and my dd, but my boys have more complicated educational issues), but it pisses me off that I HAVE to. The schools should just do the right thing.

Michelle -mom to Katlyn 4/00 , Jake 3/02, and Seth 5/04
shelbean91 is offline  
#45 of 48 Old 09-15-2010, 10:24 AM
 
Emmeline II's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 8,558
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Are you in VA?

REGULATIONS GOVERNING SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN


There is a parent complaint form link at the bottom of the page.
VDOE :: Special Education Complaints

"It should be a rule in all prophylactic work that no harm should ever be unnecessarily inflicted on a healthy person (Sir Graham Wilson, The Hazards of Immunization, 1967)."
Emmeline II is offline  
#46 of 48 Old 09-15-2010, 06:38 PM
 
BethSLP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,952
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
just would like to add that an advocate might be worth pursuing in situations like this.

I know how hard it can be to get a ton of information from other people but when you mention it to the school, they shoot it down, and because you are not an expert in the rules its hard to win the argument.

there are advocates that can come to your meetings, represent you to the school, etc. many are free of charge from non profit organizations like ARC. The school district is super careful when dealing with advocates because the advocates know the law.

Its unfortunate that it sometimes comes to that, but probably good information to have for the future should you have trouble again.

Big hugs, mama!
XOXO
B

mama to Milena Anjali (4/26/06) and Vincent Asher (4/13/09) ~ married to the love of my life since 2002.
BethSLP is offline  
#47 of 48 Old 09-17-2010, 04:34 PM
 
Birdie B.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't have any advice, but I wanted to send some support. I am so sorry you and your daughter have to put up with this crap! I hope your daughter thrives at her new school.

Lovestruck luxlove.gif mama to Girlie #1 energy.gifand Girlie #2 on the way!
Birdie B. is offline  
#48 of 48 Old 09-25-2010, 02:26 AM
 
peaceful_mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: #12 Grimmauld Place
Posts: 4,940
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
clicked on this hoping it might have some sort of insight for me...my heart goes out to you and your baby! (yeah I know she's a kindergartener just like my oldest 'baby' )

Not only has she had to deal with the trauma of whatever accident caused her injury, and I'm sure her life has changed because of this injury--she's having to cope with that.......now, when she goes to school, she has this teacher who only sees her disability. I'm going to cry now.......I can only imagine that she already sees herself as "different" than she was before, now she's got this person treating her like she is a freak rather than a 6 year old little girl who's been through ENOUGH already. AND she now has to switch schools and be "the new kid" which is probably less strange at this age than when they're older, but it's still a transition. The only *good* thing about it is it sounds like this new teacher will be much more sensitive to her needs, which will affect how she answers students' questions about your child's differences and will affect how they view and treat her. (ie the difference between treating her like she is a freak and a liability, an attitude that will cause the other kids to most likely avoid her, and treating her like she is a child who happens to need some extra help with things, do things differently, whatever the case might be...just like some kids need help learning to hold a pencil and others don't, your child needs help on the stairs and others don't.)

I'm happy to hear she's getting a much more friendly teacher and learning environment.

There are a couple schools in my city that are labelled "to avoid" that I've heard great things about....hoping this is the case for you and her!

lovin DH since 1/04, best mom for my 3 boys 10/04, 11/08, 11/10 one girlie (1/07), one 13 wk (10/13) and 5/15 just your average multigenerational living family!!
peaceful_mama is offline  
Reply

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off