Dyspraxia - any tests I can put DD through to check at home? - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 3 Old 04-30-2011, 02:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
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The checklists are helpful, as I can see and relate particular challenges I've seen DD have.  However, I was wondering if there were any tests/checks I could do.  For example, get her to do some manual things, catch a ball, etc and see how she goes.  Is there a site that shows what to look for or how to do such checks?  

 

The reason I ask is she is already learning to compensate, and so are we, so for a long time now it is difficult to "see" if she actually has dyspraxia.  We share the same issues, the ones I had, and now I've compensated for all of them, you'd certainly never notice me as having any difficulties.  For instance, I couldn't use a knife and fork, so I learned to use just a fork, in my right hand.  my daughter has never used a knife and fork, and now and again I see her try and quickly put them down and use her fingers again (she is nine, btw).  

 

That's just one small thing and on its own means nothing but just as an example of how learning to compensate can mask if something is a difficulty or not.  DH says neither of us have it because we are so "gifted" in some of the ways dyspraxia suggests you should be challenged.  For instance, I keep amazing rhythm, and dance very well and I can catch almost 100% of the time something is thrown at me.  So much so, my husband uses it as a party trick to suddenly say to a friend, hey watch this, and then throws something at me and my hand shoots out and I've caught it before I've even registered consciously something was thrown.  This is such an impressive reflex skill that he insists I could not have dyspraxia.  But little does he understand how difficult so many other things are for me.

 

With my DD, it is the same.  She is recognised as "gifted", after testing etc, so as far as he is concerned why don't I just back off, she's fine!  But I see her struggle, everyone does, but because she's so sweet and gentle, they see all those slow movements and refusal to run or even walk sometimes and other things as a blessing... as a sign she is ok.  I think because most child problems these days are about too much speedy movement, too loud, too busy, that when it is the opposite, they think that's just great.  

 

She is always tired... oh I won't go into the whole thing.  But I don't want to go an get her "diagnosed", esp as we've been through some hoops with her in the past over an unrelated issue.  She had MRI, EEG and all these tests due to some visual concerns but her sight check was perfect.  The whole nightmare resulted in nothing.  Her - whatever it was - went away and DH uses it to remind me how we spent money and time and stressed DD and we shouldn't knee jerk react.

 

I would like to check her, not just compare her to some charts.   Any advice?


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#2 of 3 Old 05-01-2011, 08:22 PM
 
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I don't know of any online checklists. You can/should read the book "The Out of Sync Child" -- she has a chapter on kids with dyspraxia. That will give you a start.

 

I know you feel like you were foolish when you pursued vision issues with your dd, but if you really suspect dyspraxia, I would recommend an evaluation by a reputable OT. IMO, it's much better to seek an evaluation and be told your child is OK than to not seek an evaluation for a child who could benefit from some therapy. We've had our ds evaluated twice: Once for sensory processing disorder, where he did need therapy. Part of the evaluation uncovered some dyspraxia issues that I'd never noticed. That evaluation was very helpful when he started school because I could explain to his teachers that he wasn't writing sloppily because he didn't care, On the other hand, when we had him evaluated for anxiety and/or Asperger's syndrome, the evaluation came back "he's a bit anxious, but not too bad." There my fears were overblown. But it was really nice to have someone tell me that. I still worry a bit, but as my dh pointed out to me last night, there are a whole bunch of things that you don't really have to do in life and it's OK if you avoid them.


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#3 of 3 Old 05-01-2011, 11:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks Lynn!  

 

I have that book in front of me right now but I'm not sure which chapter you mean.  Perhaps the vestibular sense or proprioceptive?  

 

I also think that being able to explain some of these things to her teacher would be really helpful.  Get them off her back about her writing and other things, most particularly.  I'm considering HSing actually, but I'm not sure I've got what it takes.  I messed it up last year when I tried and she just ended up a month late to start the grade.


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