What happened at your pediatric neurologist evaluation? possible DX - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 27 Old 07-23-2011, 11:09 AM - Thread Starter
 
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What happened at your child's first appointment and what tests did they order? My appointment was orginally not till next month, but now it's been bumped up to this Monday!

 

I'm wondering what to expect, what tests to ask for and what to prepare?

 

I have some of his episodes on videotape. Should I bring that?

 

 

 

 

 

 


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#2 of 27 Old 07-23-2011, 02:55 PM
 
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I would like to know this too.  We have our first appt in about 6 weeks.  I don't really have much on video right now myself.  I need to get prepared!!!  Hope someone comes along and answers this.

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#3 of 27 Old 07-23-2011, 02:59 PM
 
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We had a very in depth interview about background (family members past issues, developmental milestones, what issues were most concerning now).  Then we were given behavioral rating sheets, and the school was also given behavioral rating sheets (preschool teachers or other caregivers are sometimes given rating sheets if the child is younger).  I was directed to which tests to ask for (actually, everything was coordinated by the hospital neuro-developmental pediatric team, so I was really lucky, I didn't have to do too much arranging all by myself).  There were hearing tests done, auditory processing tests (also done by an audiologist), SLP assessments, and occupational therapy assessments.  We also had behavior rating scales to do for these last two, and so did DS's teachers.

 

If bringing the videotape helps you feel like you can explain your child better, I don't see why not.  I think all you can do to prepare is bring your spouse if possible, and if not find out anything where you aren't on the same wavelength about your child.  Make sure you know about any family medical conditions, and if he's had any previous assessments done, bring them along.

 

The only other thing I can say is give yourself a little time cushion around the appointment so that you can relax more and have some time to process any new info.  Good luck to you!


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#4 of 27 Old 07-24-2011, 11:34 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for the advice, FarmerBeth. I will give myself a little time to relax before the appointment. I've worked so hard to get this appointment that I don't want to mess it up!

 

 


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#5 of 27 Old 07-25-2011, 02:43 PM
 
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You're welcome!


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#6 of 27 Old 07-25-2011, 04:47 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Okay, so we went to the Ped Neurologist today and at first glance she didn't know why we were there. He knew all the answers to the questions and named all the colors and counted. She even commented on him having a "large" vocabulary for his age.

 

When we started telling her about his sensory issues, she realized why we were there. She ruled out autism because his language is so advanced. She didn't rule out PDD-NOS or SPD. She said the two conditions for PDD NOS were exhibited and so that couldn't be ruled out. One of the conditions was "parallel playing". He doesn't really interact with his friends, he just plays beside them.

 

She also had him do a few tests. She tried to have him push against her hands with his legs, and he was very weak. She mentioned that he sits like a "W" as well. She also noticed his thumb was bending backwards quite a way and called that something else. but I forgot what she called it. So, she referred us to an occupational therapist and a school of some sort that is supposed to have a "sensory gym."

 

I already have an appointment with another OT tomorrow night and my insurance is covering it. But maybe we will go to both OT's. I'm also interested in the sensory gym as I know DS will love it.

 

He was very well behaved in her office. I was hoping he would show his wild and uncontrollable side, but of course - this is the one time he's ever been an angel at the Dr's office! 


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#7 of 27 Old 07-26-2011, 12:02 PM
 
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I'm glad you are seeing the OT, too.  A sensory evaluation should help clear things up.  Our DS was ruled out rather rapidly for autism when we first saw the doctor when he was a preschooler for the same reason as yours (great verbal ability), and because he verbally handled social situations when he played (like being able to respectfully tell others if they were doing something that made him uncomfortable, or being able to play a make believe game with his sister), the other issues like response to sounds and stimulus, getting stuck on an activity and being completely incapable of transitioning, tics that were sometimes more rhythmic like stims, were brushed aside and put into ADD and tic disorder camps.  I think that if he had seen an OT sooner, the pediatrician would have had more info to know where I was coming from (more info made a lot of difference this third go around of evaluations.  It's good your pediatric neurologist is taking his sensory needs seriously.  You might also want to see if you can have someone (actually it was the OT who did this for us) watch his behavior in a group setting where he has to deal with more sensory and social stimulation.  The standard sensory processing scores include scoring on social and thinking (things like imagination, rigidity, etc) issues as well as the more expected ones of gross and fine motor, proprioceptive (balance), auditory and visual processing and over and under sensory sensitivity.

 

Sounds like things are on the right track!


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#8 of 27 Old 07-26-2011, 06:27 PM - Thread Starter
 
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We saw the OT today and it went okay. I was expecting to get some kind of a diagnosis, but all she told us was that he has sensory issues and needs therapy. His first appointment is next Monday. It seems like this will help him, at least until we can get him registered at the school district and get him a possible diagnosis. I know he has sensory issues, but I'd like to find out what is behind all of this? The neurologist said possibly PPD-NOS or Aspergers.

 

There were alot of issues that came up during the eval. For one, he started stimming and I'm glad she caught that. Also, it seems he has low muscle tone. And also a few times the OT tried to get him to do something like stack blocks, but he wanted to play his way and was very adamant about "correcting" her. "No, the blocks need to go in two lines, not a tower".

 

The "gym" they showed us that he will be working in didn't have much in it. Just a swing and a trampoline. There may have been other items hidden in cabinets - but I was disappointed that they didn't have a little more equipment. But I dont know much about this, so I'm just going along with it.

 

Thanks for the info FarmerBeth, yes I think things are on the right track! So sorry your LO didn't get the help he needed right away - that must have been so hard. Glad he's getting the help he needs now. It's difficult water to navigate, especially being new to all of this.

 


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#9 of 27 Old 07-26-2011, 06:54 PM
 
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I think they might take a little longer to narrow down an exact diagnosis at your son's age, anyway, but a round-about one can do you fine for now since it seems the therapies are getting put into place.  I do some teacher's aide work and I see lots of trampolines and swings in the sensory rooms.  They're supposed to be good for developing rhythm, proprioceptive (balance sense) and overall muscle tone, and a lot of kids seem to need the movement to get their sensory needs attended to.  DS seems to thrive on lots of swimming and fine motor fidgets; it takes a while to figure out what kids need.


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#10 of 27 Old 07-27-2011, 06:43 PM - Thread Starter
 
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DS hates swings, trampolines and anything that takes him into the air, so I'm not sure how he's going to do on the equipment. I'm wondering if he will even get on it!

 

He does love swimming too, and motor things.

 

I'm thinking you're right about finding a diagnosis at his age. I was hoping it would be a little more clear.  What was your son's diagnosis, if you don't mind me asking? I know you said ADD, but I think you said they got a better diagnosis later on?


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#11 of 27 Old 07-28-2011, 03:47 AM
 
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They will get to know him and see what he enjoys and work off of that. There may be times they want him to protest to get a certain reaction t hough so don't be surprised about that.

 

We don't go to the school gym we go to the hospital one. It's mainly play time. At first they had these foam stairs and ramp and they took her up and run her down as best as they could then they went to the trampoline which she was carried on. There are several types of swings but all in our gym are like 6 inches from the ground. One is 3 feet by 3 feet and the teacher sits in front of her and swings or sits on it with her. There's another one that's like a foam square log which she has let go of the rope and fallen backwards but its not like she's swinging more than a foot or two away from teacher and was caught. The cabinets are stuffed full of toys and they try to make her do wooden puzzles which she despises and makes her cry but the one teacher makes her finish. They also have  sand box full of beans.

 

It's all about playing at this age and there isn't a whole lot of pushing but just enough

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#12 of 27 Old 07-28-2011, 10:17 AM
 
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I don't know if I mentioned this on your other thread, but I'd try a developmental-behavioral pediatrician. We took ds to a hospital clinic and got detailed eval; the appointment was 3hrs. and he saw the developmental-behavioral ped, a speech language pathologist, and psychologist -- though ds was 6y 11mo at the time; I don't know what the appointment for a younger child is like.


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#13 of 27 Old 07-28-2011, 03:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BonnieNova View Post

DS hates swings, trampolines and anything that takes him into the air, so I'm not sure how he's going to do on the equipment. I'm wondering if he will even get on it!

 

He does love swimming too, and motor things.

 

I'm thinking you're right about finding a diagnosis at his age. I was hoping it would be a little more clear.  What was your son's diagnosis, if you don't mind me asking? I know you said ADD, but I think you said they got a better diagnosis later on?


His original diagnosis was Tourette's spectrum disorder (usually it takes a little linger for doctors to give and outright diagnosis for full fledged Tourettes syndrome) with ADD (inattentive type) and OCD as part of the disorder, co-morbid anxiety and non verbal learning disability.  The second evaluation reconfirmed Tourettes but disputed non verbal learning disability as the second IQ test didn't have quite that pattern (definite problem with fine and gross motor and processing speed is common in NVLD, but strong math and visual patterning abilities are not), so the idea was that the social skill and processing speed problems were secondary to ADD.  By this year's evaluation, the social skill problems were way more prominent because at age 11 some types of social problems are much less common than in a 7 year old.  Also, his behavioral scorings no longer pointed to ADD, even though he had been off medication for half a year, and the flavor of the OCD and the tics was not looking typical to Tourette's.  We had an initial informal diagnoses of Asperger's by the school SLP and the psychologist, and if we have formal confirmation we'll know for the end of next week.  I think when there are disorders with a lot of overlapping symptoms (like Tourette's and Asperger's) the diagnosis can be tricky, and they are both disorders where it can be easier to confirm at an older age.  I think if you can get a head start in the basic right direction at your son's age, it's a lot smoother for schooling and parenting.


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#14 of 27 Old 09-22-2011, 07:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My DS was not approved for special ed services!! But I'm concerned because I know he needs the help. He showed some autistic behavior, but his intelligence was rated "superior" and this knocked him out of the window for help.

 

Evaluations with the school district included:

Psychologist

Speech Therapist

Occupational Therapist

 

Bear in mind that he has already had an evaluation with a private OT and is getting OT  once a week through our insurance right now.

 

-The speech therapist said he is "bright" he is currently 2 years ahead in speech.

-The Psychologist said he seems to be neurotypical, but she did notice there were some strange behaviors that concerned her. For instance, he has poor eye contact. Also, he couldn't answer a question properly when she asked him. He had a hard time asking her what type of ice cream she liked. He "told" her that she liked chocolate without even knowing. she also noticed some other "autistic" type behavior. He is 1 year ahead in math and puzzles.

-The OT noticed he had poor motor skills, especially grasping. She rated him at the 5 percentile for motor grasping. She noticed he was very persistent and this is what helps him succeed.

 

His IQ was rated at 98 percentile, but he also scored "very likely probablilty of autism" on the vineyard test.

 

They said they need to observe him in a preschool setting in order to really get a take on his abilities. I have enrolled him for daycare for a month at the agency where he was evaluated and they will do a final evaluation at the end of October to see if he qualifies. I have no doubt that he *should* qualify, but I'm not sure that with the way they scored his intelligence if he will.

 

I just hope he shows his behavior in the day care setting this October.


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#15 of 27 Old 09-22-2011, 07:30 PM - Thread Starter
 
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NAK - Hi Farmer Beth. Sorry I didn't reply to your post earlier. It's been a crazy couple of months and I missed your reply.

 

Thanks for telling me about your DS's diagnoses. I have a feeling it's going to take a while with DS too. He was recently evaluated and scored as typical. But his behaviors at home were much different than he showed at the evaluators. He mostly stims and has problems with emotional regulation when he's bored.

 

Thanks again - I'm beginning to see how an accurate diagnosis can take a while.


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Originally Posted by BonnieNova View Post

My DS was not approved for special ed services!! But I'm concerned because I know he needs the help. He showed some autistic behavior, but his intelligence was rated "superior" and this knocked him out of the window for help.

 

Hmm...I wonder about the school--children with high IQs are not excluded from special education eligibility. Ds' first school told me that he wasn't eligible for Child Find because he didn't have articulation issues  confused.gifCuss.gif.  Though "Special Education" isn't just about academic help, it also covers speech therapy (for social reciprocity and pragmatics, not just articulation), OT, and behavioral support/legal protections. I wasn't involved with the school when ds was that age, though now at 7yo, with average to above average intelligence and at/above grade level in all subjects, ds STILL qualifies for special education as OHI--so I wouldn't accept without question what the school tells you -- whether it comes from ignorance or self-interest, schools often give inaccurate information..

 

Wright's Law: From Emotions to Advocacy

 

Tips for Parents: Meeting the Needs of Twice-Exceptional Children

 

The Child Find Mandate: What Does It Mean to You? - Wrightslaw.

 

Passing grades, IQ scores...

 

 


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#17 of 27 Old 09-23-2011, 02:16 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I think in this case it covers self interest. They kept mentioning how they are not "required" to help unless DS's issues would cause problems in a preschool setting. I took that to mean that they are trying to prevent any issues in school, not help my DS. Even the psychologist said that he could use the help, but she didn't know how to "sell" it to the school district because he didn't fit into any of the special needs categories. I feel that the evaluators didn't want to look bad to the school board.

 

Thanks for the links. May I ask what OHI stands for?

 


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#18 of 27 Old 09-23-2011, 02:38 PM
 
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Quote:
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I think in this case it covers self interest. They kept mentioning how they are not "required" to help unless DS's issues would cause problems in a preschool setting.

 

I took that to mean that they are trying to prevent any issues in school, not help my DS. Even the psychologist said that he could use the help, but she didn't know how to "sell" it to the school district because he didn't fit into any of the special needs categories. I feel that the evaluators didn't want to look bad to the school board.

 

Thanks for the links. May I ask what OHI stands for?

 

 

That is what the law is intended to cover, though I would think they would say he did not qualify instead of repeatedly saying they're not "required" to offer services. OHI means "Other Health Impaired" under IDEA, for which PDD-NOS should qualify (I think--I would expect a detailed explanation from them if they said it didn't). If you have not shown the neurologist's report to them, I'd consider it; or ask the neuro for a summary of the report geared to the school and how your ds' issues will affect learning. They don't have to take a private eval over their own, but if there is a conflict and your ds is denied services I think you can appeal and they may have to pay for an outside eval (from what I have read, I don't have personal experience with this part). "From Emotions to Advocacy" details this type of thing in one place (though most of it is probably on their website); the e-version of this book is cheaper.

 

I don't have time to find the actual law right now, but the link below is a summary of IDEA:

 

 

Quote:

IDEA (The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act)

 

The categories of disabilities are; autism, deaf/blind, deafness, hearing impaired, mental retardation, multiple disabilities, orthopedic impairment, serious emotional disturbance, specific learning disabilities, speech or language impairment, traumatic brain injury, visual impairment including blindness, and other health impairment. To be eligible, a student must have a disability that adversely affects her or his educational performance and must need special education in order to receive an appropriate education. 

 

http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/guide/adhd-causes

Under IDEA/IEP, if your child has a disability that adversely affects educational performance, your child is entitled to an education that is designed to meet the child's unique needs and from which your child receives educational benefit.

 

A 504 is helping your child get the same education that everyone else is getting--more for a student that needs accommodations to help them learn (like sitting next to the teacher) or for behavior, and that they are not punished for things that they cannot control due to the ADHD (like needing to work standing up or not sit inside a group).

[A IEP or 504 is not an escalation or punishments for the teacher/school. It's more about getting all appropriate parties involved and on the same page. The student, parent/legal guardian, teachers, principals, Pupil Services administrators, support staff (i.e. nurse, counselor, psychologist, language/speech pathologist) as well as the student's physician or therapist may be involved in the placement process including the 504 meeting.]

 

Key Differences Between Section 504, the ADA, and the IDEA.

 

(http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/sec504.summ.rights.htm)


 

 

 


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#19 of 27 Old 09-23-2011, 03:51 PM
 
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Hi BonnieNova!  Keep the dialogue going with the preschool as much as possible.  Any accommodations that your DS was not yet approved for may become more obviously necessary in a group, school setting as well as more obvious with age.I know that my son is by far not the only child I've met where because of higher IQ and high verbal ability, autism spectrum disorders were not even considered.  However, the more frequent and intense the social interactions, and the older the child and the higher the expectations, the more obvious special needs become.  The input of the preschool teachers, and later the classroom teachers, could be what helps to show that your son does require some special services.  Get as informed as you can as to your child's educational rights, and then keep at it no matter the outcome. (By the way, DS does have the formal diagnoses now, of ASD, although we were told by the old diagnostic system it would have specified Aspergers, now they are just saying ASD and naming strengths and weaknesses.  Like your DS, he was ahead by a couple of years in verbals, in the 5th percentile in fine motor, but also a slow processing speed, gifted patterning, logic and math.  Bright kids are hard to diagnose, but not impossible, so keep involved if you know something is up!)


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#20 of 27 Old 09-23-2011, 06:21 PM
 
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I would ask for your child's specific test scores.

 

For instance, speech testing is usually made up of 3 tests..

1) Articulation

2) Receptive

3) Expressive

 

My son currently has an articulation disorder diagnosis (previous was I believe Speech Apraxia).  While he has always scored high on Receptive, his last testing at the transition from Pre-school to school aged services put him on an almost 3rd grade level for Receptive.  He has had huge strides in his Expressive and I believe is now on grade level.  But his articulation is behind.  It is at least 2.5 deviations behind.  His combined speech puts him right on target...but he still qualifies for an IEP due to his Articulation problems.

 

So, what is important to know is his individual test and subtest scores, and where each of those put him on the scale. 

 

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#21 of 27 Old 09-24-2011, 07:20 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for the info, ladies. I have a copy of his speech test scores among other replies I want to post here to all of you, but I have a three week old - and it seems to be getting harder to get any "me" time!

 

Be back soon to update - and thanks again for the responses.


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#22 of 27 Old 11-09-2011, 11:48 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Just wanted to update. I haven't really paid the type of attention to this thread that I want to, mainly because my 8 week old has severe reflux and I am trying to sleep/ take care of DS1/ find a way to breastfeed DS2 without causing him pain. With all of this going on, we have also continued evaluations for our oldest and we may be getting an Aspergers diagnosis next week.

 

He had his educational evaluation and the special ed teacher suggested Aspergers. He then had a private test and he scored in the Aspergers range. The evaluator said it most likely is, but she can not diagnose and we meet with the school doctor next week to see what will happen. I'm hoping he can get some special education help. I'm also reading the book (in all my spare time eyesroll.gif) Emmeline suggested about helping the special ed child.

 

One of these days, I will get on here and post a summary of his test scores. Not happy about an Aspergers dx, but at least we are getting a handle on something.

 

 


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#23 of 27 Old 11-10-2011, 02:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BonnieNova View Post

Just wanted to update. I haven't really paid the type of attention to this thread that I want to, mainly because my 8 week old has severe reflux and I am trying to sleep/ take care of DS1/ find a way to breastfeed DS2 without causing him pain. With all of this going on, we have also continued evaluations for our oldest and we may be getting an Aspergers diagnosis next week.

 

He had his educational evaluation and the special ed teacher suggested Aspergers. He then had a private test and he scored in the Aspergers range. The evaluator said it most likely is, but she can not diagnose and we meet with the school doctor next week to see what will happen. I'm hoping he can get some special education help. I'm also reading the book (in all my spare time eyesroll.gif) Emmeline suggested about helping the special ed child.

 

One of these days, I will get on here and post a summary of his test scores. Not happy about an Aspergers dx, but at least we are getting a handle on something.

 

 



Try not to let it get you down.  Your son is so young and no matter what the diagnoses, with such early intervention a lot can change for the better.  Now that you do have a handle on something, you and the professionals working with him can help with his weaknesses and he'll learn to cope with himself. 

 

At 5 years old, my DS was so non compliant in cognitive testing, the assessors had to guess at him having a borderline IQ score but couldn't tell for sure because of the behavior.  At 7, he was compliant enough to find out he was actually 2E with some really high cognitive scores, but his tiks were so bad we couldn't even go on public transit with him and feel comfortable because people were so disturbed by the loud throat clearing and skin picking.  He didn't have a friend yet, transitions at school and home were like dealing with a 2 year old.  I'd try to get him to leave off from reading a book to transition to leaving for a favorite sport, and one hour of gradual warning wasn't enough.  We had a whole year of hearing only about the game "Spore" and Darwin's theory of evolution (and now I look back at this wondering how he wasn't diagnosed at that point).  Now I've got a quirky but terrific 11 year old that shines at the science fairs, has one good (equally quirky) friend, is so interesting to be around and has lots of big dreams about changing the world for the better just like any other kid; and I really believe he can.  We have plenty of challenges (he just reached the point this year that he can call someone on the telephone, for example), and the teen years are looming and I'm nervous.  I know some people aren't as lucky and their ASD kids may have more challenges than mine, and I really respect the challenges that parents with children with children more profoundly affected with autism face.  I'm just telling my story because I think with help from the community at large, lots of kids with ASD, especially HFA/Aspergers, can do well for who they want to be.  There's no way I can ever picture my DS being particularly socially adept, or being the life of the party, but he doesn't care about that stuff, and so I try not to sweat that.

 

Anyway, just try your best to focus on what you can now do to help your child rather than letting the label get you down.  It sounds like you have a bright, interesting little boy who has challenges and quirks, and the diagnoses name won't change that reality, just give you some tools to cope.


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#24 of 27 Old 11-10-2011, 03:56 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Wow Farmer Beth - it's so nice to hear that your son is turning out so well! And thanks for the encouragement.

 

I just recieved the latest results of his educational evaluation. (This was the last evaluation we had). I'm going to post his scores on here because some of them confuse me. Like how he managed to do so poorly on his cognitive, but yet he impressed the evaluator with how much he knew. The evaluator has an explanation for that, which I will include. With this report, I'm not sure we are going to get the help we need.

 

We had him enrolled in daycare just for a month because they wanted to evaluate him in a preschool setting. The teacher told me that when they came to watch him, he acted completely NT. Before the evaluator came and after she left DS was completely different eyesroll.gif

 

Emmeline, we have an appointment for a developmental pediatrician. Thanks for the advice. The earliest they could take us is in May! I hope we dont have to wait that long to get the DX we need.

 

Here are some of the results (S.D. scores):DAYC

Cognitive - negative 1.5

Communication WNL

Social Emotional WNL

Physical Dev WNL

Adaptive behavior -negative 1.6

General Dev. Quotient WNL

 

Bracken Basic Concept Scale BBCS-R

SRC Composite Advanced

 

Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist CBLC

Syndrome Scales

Emotionally reactive WNL

Anxious depressed WNL

Somatic complaints WNL

Withdrawn WNL

sleep problems clinical

Attention problems WNL

Aggressive behavior borderline

Internalizing problems WNL

Externalizing problems clinical

total problems clinical

DSM oriented

affected problems clinical

anxiety problems WNL

pervasive dev. probs borderline

Attention deficit/hyperactive clinical

OD problems WNL

 

GADS

Aspergers disorder quotient Highly probable

 

- Cognitive development

D's score on the DAYC falls within the poor range. However, this score appears to be a low estimate of his cognitive abilities. Because D's skills were not solid at the 36 month level, he established an early ceiling and therefore did not recieve credit for the remaining items. D's SRC of 122 suggests that his pre-readiness skills are advanced for his age. D stacked up to 6 blocks and reprodcued a simple block design. He matched simple shapes. He understood the concepts of one and one more. He understood the concept of heavy. D counted up to 5 objects. D had difficulty sorting objects by color, but easily sorted objects by ite,. D did not nest at least 4 cups into size order. D did not udnerstand the concepts of same/different or more/less. He did not understand the concept of 3, such as in Give me three blocks.

 

With regards to pre-readiness D identified 10 common colors, all basic shapes including a pyramid and a cylinder. D identified several letters, upper and lowercase as well as several numbers including 2 digit numbers such as 27 and 53. D identified 4 concepts related to size/comparison.

 

- Achenback behavioral checklist

d's early childhood teacher completed the CTRF. Based on her report of his classroom behavior he obtained a total score of 49 which falls into normal limits. She indicated that within the last 2 weeks he has begun to show behaviors that are not typical for him (ie running and flapping, speaking "jibberish" going into his own world) teacher reported that these behaviors are only observed 30% of the time.

 

Aspergers disorder scale

GADS resulted in a Aspergers Disorder quotient of 105, 63rd percentile which indicates the probablity of Aspergers disorder to be "high". It is noted taht this is not a diagnostic scale. The GADS identifies children at risk for aspergers. Based on this assessment d has difficulties undeerstanding social norms and relating approriately to his peers. D attahces very concrete meanings oto his words. He does not understand what causes people to dislike him. D has difficulty understanding humor. He demonstrates an excellent memory and is superior in some areas of intelligence. He is very concerned with speaking correcly and pronouncing words perfectly. D becomes frustrated quickly when he is undure of whats expected of him. D demonstrates some unusual movements when walking or running (flaps arms).

 

Summary

-Ds cgnitive score should be interpreted with caution as it appears to be a low estimate of his abilities

- his adaptive behavior suggests mild delay in his skills

- D demonstrated many skills way beyond his established ceiling but could not recieve credit for those items due to the scoring limitations of the DAYC.

- DSRC of 122 suggests that his pre readiness skills ar advanced for his age

 

Results of this evaluation reveal that D possesses well developed cognitive, academic, and language skills with strengths in letter, number and shape recognition. He exhibits weaknesses in his ability to relate apporpriately to others and his ability to cope with day to day frustrations. However based on the teachers report, it appears that D does not have significant difficulty functioning within the classroom. His scores on this evaluation suggest that he does not have difficulty learning of acquiring knowledge.

 

headscratch.gif ever feel like pulling your hair out!? I don't understand how they could summarize it like this, with his low cognitive scores! Sure, he identified all the 2 digit numbers that they asked of him (which I had no clue he could do).. sure, he knew what a cylinder, cube, column was... But what about all the gaps in his knowledge?

 

He could pick out three balls in the picture, but could not hand the evalutor three blocks. He could answer the question "which of these belong together" and put the pictures together that were similar, but could not tell the evaluator which two items were the same. He could not point to the picture which had more or less of an item. And whenever he felt he couldn't answer a question he would start stimming and distracting the evaluator. How did she not pick up on this?

 

We have the appointment with the doctor next week. I'm poring over the books I have looking for some kind of way to convince these people that my DS needs help. I understand he's advanced in some areas, but what about the areas hes delayed in? This has to be a joke? I'm not trying to be argumentative, but I just don't understand how they can say he is well developed!

 

Thanks for listening. Now off to cleaning I go.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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#25 of 27 Old 11-11-2011, 08:12 AM
 
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This sounds a little similar to our own DS's first assessment.  Sometimes if a child isn't particularly compliant (I don't mean in a purposeful way, but just unable to follow the test as per the norm) the testers try introducing concepts in ways that are not officially part of the assessment.  ie: our DS went on so much about Spore and Darwin during his testing at age 7, that they couldn't get sufficient answers during the visual pattern completion part of the IQ test.  The tester ended up using a verbal logic test that is usually used with older kids and adults to see where his logic was at in a way he was willing to respond to.  She also used conversational and game means to try to see some visual patterning.  She could tell his ability with logic was high, but she couldn't score all of this as it wasn't part of the standard testing.  This could be part of what's going on with your son in that they may have to officially assign lower scoring but can tell he is capable of demonstrating more given the right circumstances.  Also, kids at risk for Asperger's tend to have NVLD type scores, and can have strong memories and ability to acquire  some types of knowledge but with gaps in performance (nonverbal) abilities, so academic type testing at the preschool level may be misleading.The not knowing which pictures are the same but knowing which things go together thing and the like sounds like some sort of difficulty with the semantics of the language.  I'm no expert on this, but my younger DS had some language delays and we used to have these sorts of issues with him, and still have problems with some types of concepts like the difference between tomorrow and yesterday, or "I gave this to someone" vs "someone gave this to me".  This type of thing can happen both with ASD or separately. 

 

It sure is a lot to sort out.  You're on a good start, but I think it's great you're seeing the developmental pediatrician in May to get this further sorted out.  You don't seem to have quite enough to work with.  Did they give you any recommendations for helping your son in the meanwhile?


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It sounds like you've been getting lots of good support. We took DS to a developmental pediatrician when he was 3 because of his behaviours, and he spent an hour with us which is almost unheard of in a doctor's appointment, but in the end he felt DS was "neurotypical". He was not the only expert to rule out autism. But as DS got older we got a better idea of what was going on and he was just tested at age 7 and it was clear as a bell. So I want to caution others here that the world of autism is rife with stories of misdiagnosed kids at young ages. The information is getting out there, and hopefully more health professionals will come to recognize the early signs, but still it can be really hard getting the right diagnosis when the kids are really young. Best of luck to you!


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Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmerBeth View Post

This could be part of what's going on with your son in that they may have to officially assign lower scoring but can tell he is capable of demonstrating more given the right circumstances.  Also, kids at risk for Asperger's tend to have NVLD type scores, and can have strong memories and ability to acquire  some types of knowledge but with gaps in performance (nonverbal) abilities, so academic type testing at the preschool level may be misleading.The not knowing which pictures are the same but knowing which things go together thing and the like sounds like some sort of difficulty with the semantics of the language.  I'm no expert on this, but my younger DS had some language delays and we used to have these sorts of issues with him, and still have problems with some types of concepts like the difference between tomorrow and yesterday, or "I gave this to someone" vs "someone gave this to me".  This type of thing can happen both with ASD or separately. 

 

It sure is a lot to sort out.  You're on a good start, but I think it's great you're seeing the developmental pediatrician in May to get this further sorted out.  You don't seem to have quite enough to work with.  Did they give you any recommendations for helping your son in the meanwhile?

Yes, my DS is similar. He will remember something that happened 6 months ago and say that it happened yesterday. He remembers things that haven't been spoken about. Such as this morning he said " Mama I really missed you last night". me:"Oh you did? I was sleeping right next to you all night." D:"no you weren't, you went to work so that you could buy me Annie and Clarabel (toys)".  He was speaking about a time last year when I went to work at night (which I hardly ever do), and he was upset about it. I had told him "Mommy has to work so that you could have food and clothes and toys". He had asked for Annie and Clarabel at that time and I said "sure". We then bought him Annie and Clarabel that week.

 

So it makes me wonder... Is he just getting the *days* mixed up? Or maybe he is reliving the past? Or maybe it was traumatic for him so he remembers it so clearly? He does this often.

 

The recommendation they gave was to enroll him into an integrated NT/ special ed preschool at least 2 days a week. They think he will do well there. So they recommend for him to be there, but don't want to foot the bill? Unfortunately, we don't have the funds to do this at the time. We barely have enough for groceries each week. This is the case we will be bringing before the evaluators and doctor next week and hoping they will approve him for help.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piglet68 View Post

It sounds like you've been getting lots of good support. We took DS to a developmental pediatrician when he was 3 because of his behaviours, and he spent an hour with us which is almost unheard of in a doctor's appointment, but in the end he felt DS was "neurotypical". He was not the only expert to rule out autism. But as DS got older we got a better idea of what was going on and he was just tested at age 7 and it was clear as a bell. So I want to caution others here that the world of autism is rife with stories of misdiagnosed kids at young ages. The information is getting out there, and hopefully more health professionals will come to recognize the early signs, but still it can be really hard getting the right diagnosis when the kids are really young. Best of luck to you!


Thank you. It's hard when you don't really know what to look for as a parent. There are some behaviors which I thought were NT and come to find out they aren't. I wish I would have picked up on them earlier. And then there are times when he acts completely NT, like when he is in a new situation such as a Dr.s office, which means no diagnosis! But when we bring him home he's a totally different child.

 

Speaking of this... Maybe someone can shed some light on this for me. He is always attention seeking. He needs LOADS of attention and can't focus without it. He starts stimming and head banging, pushing, bumping into me, grabbing my legs so I can't walk and so on. But he also does things when he is getting attention - but just not *enough* attention. He will do things like pretend his feelings are hurt about something I did. Or maybe he isn't pretending?

 

Last night, he was helping me make a cake. He started throwing food around and I had to tell him that if he didn't stop, he wouldn't be able to help (seems like he throws things just to push my buttons). Then he plays this game where he tries to get as far as he can. So instead of throwing food around, he is mixing the batter and "whips" the spoon out making the batter fly onto the counter. I figure it's a mistake. I don't say anything. He does it again and again - I think he's waiting for a response. So I tell him if he does it again, he won't be able to help anymore. So then he starts pretending like he's going to do it. Making the motions of whipping the spoon out, but not following through. So I'm getting annoyed but don't say anything. I start spooning the batter into the cake pan and then put it in the oven. Then he starts crying "IIIIIII wanted to do ITTTTTTTT!" Like his feelings are hurt. It's almost as if he knows I will feel bad about it, and he's trying to get some emotion out of me. I can't figure out what this is. Is this something that every child does? A situation like this plays out almost every day. More often since we have a new baby in the house.

 

 

 


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