The special kids go back to school! (2011 edition) - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 67 Old 08-02-2011, 06:55 AM - Thread Starter
 
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It's that time of year again!  Whether your child is starting school or preschool for the first time, going back with a new IEP/504 Plan, starting a new school, or just going back to the same school with the same plan, this can be our spot to discuss how it goes!

 

I'll start. My DD is starting High School this year. I cannot believe it. First, the general parenting deal of "I can't believe my BABY is a high schooler."  But also because her education at times has been such a rocky road, but we are expecting this year to be fairly smooth. She's going to the same small alternative school she went to last year, and middle school and high school are in the same building with the same teachers. Because so little of her education has gone smoothly, it's odd that the transition to highschool *should* be smooth.

 

We've done something different for her education each year for the last several years in attempts to figure out what actually works for her, and this is the first "back to school" season in I-don't-know-how-many-years where we are doing the same thing as the year before and expecting it to be smooth.


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#2 of 67 Old 08-02-2011, 08:56 AM
 
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My DD is starting kindergarten this fall. It's in a special school and a full day program. We're both excited and worried about how she'll do. Mainly because it's a lot of change all at once. But she's got an EA in place, her IEP is done and we've got before and after school care in place. She'll be joining us on the commute into town five days a week starting Sept 6. She's fairly used to that as she has to drive in with her Nana 4 days a week now for therapies at her clinic. We are hoping for the best all round.


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#3 of 67 Old 08-02-2011, 02:38 PM
 
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We registered the kids for our neighborhood public school last week. The principal's office called yesterday to make an appointment. The principal reviewed Drake's records and would like to talk. We're meeting with him on Monday.

 

It's a new record. We're being called to the principal's office before school even started!

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#4 of 67 Old 08-02-2011, 06:03 PM
 
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We have to redo Alec's IEP because he has to switch schools due to a move.  We are still in the same district and his needs are somewhat mostly the same.  I would like them to work on more academic things though so I may try revamp the IEP instead of it being a routine switch one school name for another thing.  I know from working with him over the summer that he can spell and recognize words and similar sounds.  I would like to see them develop more of his academic skills instead of just focusing on what he can't do. 

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#5 of 67 Old 08-02-2011, 10:03 PM
 
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DS is all set up for the fall and grade 5 - the whole school has changed as it went P-12 instead of P-7, so that's new for everyone. He's kind of nervous because all of the academic adaptations were removed (there's a consensus he doesn't need them and that he does need to be challenged more) including adaptations over his handwriting.  He's shown he's capable of writing legibly (very messy but still readable) at a decent speed, and the idea is to force him to keep up the practice - but it's very hard for him, and he's nervous.  He's on an IPP (like your IEP) for social skills.  He had to present his strengths and weaknesses and what he felt he needed for his education to this year's teacher as part of the process.  I was so proud of him because he really gave it honest thought.  He still isn't exactly sure what's with the needing to make friends business, but at least he gets that he needs people in some way.  I really hope the ADOS (it's August 11th) is conclusive enough to help continue things on such a good trajectory, we've really had a great year with the school even though the social difficulties got so beyond just quirky this year.  I never thought I would want a diagnoses, but I see the teachers working so hard to figure out what he needs, and I think they kind of need the label to get a handle on it.


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#6 of 67 Old 08-03-2011, 03:23 AM
 
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DD1 is going into 3rd grade at the same school she has been at since 1st grade. It is a small, alternative school from PK-8th. She does have a new teacher this year, the grades are combined so for the previous two years, she was with the same teacher. I've been unsuccessful so far this summer at setting up a meeting with the new  teacher, DD1's therapist, and I. I'm hoping I will be able to in the next couple weeks. I'm not expecting too many issues, their was a student last year in this teacher's class who is severely dyslexic with his own tutor that works with him daily so she is familiar with some issues already. DD1's therapist is just quite particular about what she should and should not be doing and so am I. 


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#7 of 67 Old 08-03-2011, 07:20 AM
 
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Hello, ds will be in 5th this year.  He has gone to the same school since kindergarten, but only had an IEP since last fall, and it is the same until we meet again this fall.  He has been doing OT over the summer to help get in the habit of writing, but he is fairly resistant.  We are in the process of switching his meds. because we hope it will control his seizures and slow down some of his impulsive behaviors.  His psychologist also wants to meet with his teacher.  We do not know if that will happen, though, because I have signed releases multiple times last year at the school, psych, and neuro and nobody was talking.  Hoping this year will go smoother.  

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#8 of 67 Old 08-03-2011, 07:56 AM
 
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DS is starting kindergarten in a few weeks. He has SPD (SID) but despite two tries, does *not* have an IEP. I'm pretty nervous about this. The main reason (besides school budget, which I suspect was a big one) is that he is about +7 years in language ability and has overcome an articulation disorder, so the school district is figuring that he's going to be able to manage coping skills enough to handle school. Because intelligence in one area = coping skills?? ...Yeah.

 

We were homeschooling, and that's still his first choice, but I've become disabled and we (dh, myself, my team of doctors) decided that it's in everyone's best interest to try public school for a semester or two. The kids need a break from my illness and I need time to rest and handle therapy and doctors' appointments, and to see if I can get on top of this. DD started in the same school last February and did a semester of first grade. Academically it wasn't a good fit, but she was safe and entertained and had a good time. She wants to go back for one more year. Despite our difficulties with the school district, I've been really impressed with this specific school -- the staff have gone out of their way to welcome our family and to accommodate my disability. When we went to kindergarten registration day in June, they seemed willing to learn about SPD and made a point of asking me about DS's needs. I'm really hoping that we can make this work even without an IEP, through cooperation and communication.

 

The nurse asked about any physical issues he might have, and made a note that he has a hard time eating (not interested, easily distracted, some chewing issues, overwhelmed by noise and activity levels of a cafeteria setting, drops weight really easily, is being monitored for weight gain by our doctor). She said she'll keep an eye on him and how he handles lunch and snack time, and I can go to the school and join him for lunch in the cafeteria to see how he's doing myself. I don't want to isolate him, but I'm willing to ask that he eat in a quieter setting if he starts dropping weight. I'm writing up a letter outlining what SPD is and what DS's specific quirks are -- he's variable-type, so he falls in the most unpredictable category (whee!) -- and offering some easy and affordable suggestions to help him, like putting him in the front of the room so he can focus on the teacher's voice better, since he has next to no audio filter and can have a really hard time sorting out one voice from a bunch of background noise. I'm nervous that the school nurse and the kindergarten team didn't seem to know what SPD was when I met them on registration day, but I also ran into another incoming-K mom who's an OT and she said she was putting together a packet of information for them, too. I think her kiddo also has SPD.

 

So basically, I'm keeping my fingers crossed that this is a positive experience for him....

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#9 of 67 Old 08-03-2011, 04:34 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by earthmama369 View Post

DS is starting kindergarten in a few weeks. He has SPD (SID) but despite two tries, does *not* have an IEP. I'm pretty nervous about this. The main reason (besides school budget, which I suspect was a big one) is that he is about +7 years in language ability and has overcome an articulation disorder, so the school district is figuring that he's going to be able to manage coping skills enough to handle school. Because intelligence in one area = coping skills?? ...Yeah.


It can be hard to get accommodation for sensory issues that occur without another qualifying DX. In some states, it's impossible. My DD has intense sensory issues as part of her ASD package, and she could be accommodated at school for sensory issues, but in the state we've lived in they couldn't have done anything for her without the ASD dx.

 

Which is stupid.  uhoh3.gif

 

At least the teacher and the nurse are going in with great attitudes and are ready to help make things. thumb.gif

 

Lunch and snack time can be social times, so if he can get through them and eat a lot when he first gets home, it might be nice for him. Do they eat in a cafeteria or in the room? The cafeteria was a little much for my DD's sensory issues.

 

 

 


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#10 of 67 Old 08-03-2011, 06:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by earthmama369 View Post

 

The nurse asked about any physical issues he might have, and made a note that he has a hard time eating (not interested, easily distracted, some chewing issues, overwhelmed by noise and activity levels of a cafeteria setting, drops weight really easily, is being monitored for weight gain by our doctor). She said she'll keep an eye on him and how he handles lunch and snack time, and I can go to the school and join him for lunch in the cafeteria to see how he's doing myself. I don't want to isolate him, but I'm willing to ask that he eat in a quieter setting if he starts dropping weight. 

 

My ds was a slow eater and never felt like he had enough time to finish his food (was worried that he wouldn't be ready to go out on the playground,) so would essentially just not bother and then would eat his lunch in the car ride after school.  I was concerned about this and mentioned it to his teacher.  She allowed ds to go to lunch 10 min. early with another boy (who likely had an IEP that allowed for this) and it worked out great.  Just an idea.
 

 


Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

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#11 of 67 Old 08-03-2011, 07:12 PM
 
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We're moving specifically to get into a school district with good programs for kids on the spectrum. We have a meeting later this month and since he has a dx (well several) already from doctors, OTs etc they say they can fast track him into services rather than wait it out for the actual eval. We're just going to be doing therapies at the district as he's not a good fit for the developmental preschool, so we'll keep on with our homeschooling plan, but it will be good to have extra resources available. So far the district has been insanely wonderful. They bent the rules to set the meeting up now (we don't move into the district for two and a half weeks, technically, they can not set up the meeting until we move in, but the program coordinator did not want us to have to wait as it all gets backed up right as school starts.) The program coordinator also gave me her personal cell phone number in case I had questions when they were out of office(!) and offered to DRIVE our intake packet to our new home if it did not make it to us in the chaos of moving! I am so shocked and pleased. Especially since I had a TERRIBLE experience with the district I am in now. I am actually looking forward to working with the school at this point. 


Stephenie, Wife to Nick partners.gif 9/3/05 Mama to Keagan treehugger.gif autismribbon.gif 4/12/07, Eden dust.gifhomebirth.jpg3/29/09  3rdtri.gif Someone new coming in July and two angels 6/06 and 10/10. Check out my blog! blogging.jpg

 
 
 
  

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#12 of 67 Old 08-04-2011, 06:53 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephenie View Post

We're moving specifically to get into a school district with good programs for kids on the spectrum. ....So far the district has been insanely wonderful.


energy.gif  I love hearing happy school stories!

 

We moved last year and a huge part of it was getting DD into the right school for her. It was worth it. thumb.gif

 


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#13 of 67 Old 08-04-2011, 12:09 PM
 
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DS will be in 2nd grade this year at the same school he was attended for the past 2 years. We are continuing with partial mainstreaming, so he will be in the regular classroom about 70-75% of the time and in the autism classroom the other 25-30%. He will conitue to get ST, OT, and APE services. DS has wonderful teachers and therepists who are dedicated to their work and truly value DS as a person, so we are excited about what this year will bring.

 

This year DS is due for his triennial re-evaluations. We all know that he will still qualify for special ed services, so we will be using the re-evals to measure his progress and refine his goals. I was able to convice the school to include a Fucntional Vision Assessment (FVA) as part of the testing. I really wanted this test to be done last year, but the school refused. This time Iwas able to get it on the list of items to be included in the re-eval. The school is insisting on doing an IQ test this time around. I am reluctant because a verbal IQ test would be difficult given DS's language difficulties and a non-verbal test is problematic because of his vision impairment. So we are still trying to work that out.

 

I will be attending Wrightslaw "Special Education Law & Advocay" training program next week and am looking forward learning more about special ed law.

 

 


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#14 of 67 Old 08-04-2011, 12:47 PM
 
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Gabrielle starts kindergarten on the 17th.  We have a 504 meeting next Friday.  I am still trying to get all her paperwork together.  dizzy.gif  To make things more complicated she is starting serial casting on August 10th.  She will be in a cast (changed out each week) for 3-4 weeks.  Which means she will also be in a wheelchair. 

 

To make things even more complicated she has a wound on the bottom of the foot that will be serial casted.  We see the Wound Clinic tomorrow.  So serial casting is up in the air on whether we can start next Wednesday or not. 

 

I am trying to find books and literature to help explain to the kids in her class what she has.  Busy, busy!


Anne, Mama to Conner 2/27/04 blahblah.gif  Gabrielle 2/6/06 W/LMC-TCS, Neurogenic Bladder, AFO & KAFO wearer, Neurogenic Bowel energy.gif & Delaney 5/12/08 mischievous.gif &  Beethoven cat.gif& Gizmo cat.gif

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#15 of 67 Old 08-04-2011, 02:44 PM
 
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My son will start prek4 and be mainstreamed for the first time.  He is in the same school but will be in a larger class with less teachers(only 2 versus the 1 with 4 aides last year).  I worry he is going to fall behind but I know he needs this and am hoping and praying he does well.


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#16 of 67 Old 08-04-2011, 07:33 PM
 
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My guy starts fifth grade next week. It's his final year in Elementary School and I am having a really hard time dealing with it, lol. I am downright afraid of what 6th grade will bring, so I am doing all I can to just focus on THIS year and leave next year to sort out when it arrives. I would like it very much though if we could call a moratorium on all kids growing up. No more of that please! ;-)


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#17 of 67 Old 08-05-2011, 06:59 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Here are happy wishes for everyone's school year  dust.gif
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lollybrat View Post

The school is insisting on doing an IQ test this time around. I am reluctant because a verbal IQ test would be difficult given DS's language difficulties and a non-verbal test is problematic because of his vision impairment. So we are still trying to work that out.


Have you seen this article?

http://www.iser.com/resources/autism-iq.html

 

Here is a quote from it:

Refuse to consent to standard IQ tests (the WISC-IV and the Stanford Binet), but authorize the school to use other reputable IQ tests which may be more valid assessments of intellectual ability with autistic kids. Three of those other IQ tests are: i) the Raven Progressive Matrices test; ii) the Leiter International Performance Scale (your child needs to be able to communicate by gesturing for this test); and iii) the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children. Understand that it is not clear whether or not a parent has the legal right to tell the school district which IQ test you want administered. However, you can try this approach and see if it sticks.

 

This is another article on IQ testing and autism:

http://www.autism-help.org/assessment-iq-test-autism.htm

 

My Dd was 13 before she was really able to comply with testing enough to get a good measure of her IQ. You might not be able to get around it with the school, but by understanding what it does and doesn't tell you about your child, you can keep it from getting under your skin.


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#18 of 67 Old 08-05-2011, 10:45 AM
 
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DS is starting 2nd grade next week. The last half of last year did NOT go very well at all. DS wasn't handling school well and I was being called in to deal with him 2-3 days a week. The last couple weeks of school went better, with just an issue here and there, but for the entire summer he's been whining about school and just being very negative about it.

 

However, yesterday they had an open house at the school and now he's totally stoked! Why? "Because S**** is in my class so that means I have a whole year to prove to her that I'm going to marry her!". LOL! Yes, the girl is the motivation for him to go to school. This little girl was in his Kindergarten class, but not in his 1st grade class. She's in his class this year and he's so totally thrilled. This little girl is a spunky thing and won't put up with any crap from anyone though, which is good! It blows my mind that, at age 7, he's talking about getting married dizzy.gif

 

As for everything else, I have a feeling we're going to have some issues and I'll be in the office within the first week of school. There were a LOT of changes that happened to the school (new principal, lots of staff were fired because there was a new elementary school built and a lot of the students from our school are going to the new school, classrooms and teachers were switched around, etc). DS's special ed teacher was fired, due to this (or, that's what we were told but then the school went and hired a new special ed teacher so I'm not sure we're getting the whole story). His OT at school was moved to the new school, so now I have no idea who his OT is for this year. The one consistency is that last year he was in a split 1st/2nd grade room. There were 2 classrooms together (2 teachers). Both were split level classes. He had his main teacher for most of the day and then for a couple hours each day he switched to the other teacher. This year they stopped doing the split classrooms, but they did put him in the class with the teacher he saw for a couple hours every day last year. So that worked out super well for him. When we went to the open house yesterday, his main teacher could only give us a general picture of what the para situation was. He's supposed to have a para with him the whole day. Apparently they told her (the teacher) that there would be a para for ds during math and recess. Uhhhh..... no. Not acceptable. So I went to talk to the principal, who said that she didn't know the whole schedule so I would have to talk to the facilitator (who wasn't there at the time). I know that the special ed teacher will be in ds's classroom, specifically to work with him, for 1 hour in the morning. Then for 30 minutes in the afternoon ds goes to her resource room to work. So during those times he doesn't need a para with him. During every other time, he does.

 

Writing has become a big struggle for ds. Last year it was torture, and for most of the year other people (me, his teacher, para or special ed teacher) were doing the writing for him. In May we had an IEP meeting and had it added in that he could use a computer to type his homework (not all the assignments, but things that were longer he can). We bought him a laptop this summer and he's been practicing typing. When we left the meeting in May, the OT was saying that she recommended ds be allowed to go to the classroom computer in the corner to type assignments. I do not agree with that and want him to have a laptop available to him at school that he can have on his desk. I don't want him separated from his peers like that during all assignments. Kids will start noticing and asking questions. It would be a lot more discreet to just put a laptop on his desk and let him work. So, we'll see what we can do.


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#19 of 67 Old 08-06-2011, 02:28 PM
 
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DS starts 9th grade this year, as well. I can't believe I have a high schooler already! He attends a self-contained autism class in a charter special education school... it's public, but very small enrollment. He's been going to this school for two years and will this year as well. He'll just be in a different classroom.

 

DS is also joining a special needs bowling league through the park district this fall. So far, we've been really happy with his services and teachers.


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#20 of 67 Old 08-07-2011, 07:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

 

Here are happy wishes for everyone's school year  dust.gif
 


Have you seen this article?

http://www.iser.com/resources/autism-iq.html

 

Here is a quote from it:

 

This is another article on IQ testing and autism:

http://www.autism-help.org/assessment-iq-test-autism.htm

 

My Dd was 13 before she was really able to comply with testing enough to get a good measure of her IQ. You might not be able to get around it with the school, but by understanding what it does and doesn't tell you about your child, you can keep it from getting under your skin.


I have seen these articles, but thanks for the reminder.

I need to learn more about the Leiter and the Kaufman tests. I am familiar with the Raven and it is completely inappropriate for my son with his vision impairments.

I plan to have both DS's psychologist and his Ophthamologist give their opinion on the choosing an appropriate test.

Personally, I don't give a lot of importance to IQ testing. I'm more interested in what insight it can tell us about how DS learns than what the final numbers are. But I am concerned about the school having an inaccurate test part as part of his record.

Lolly
Mom to an amazing little guy, age 9 (Autism, Hyperlexia, Dyspraxia, Albinism, Chromosome Microdeletion)

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#21 of 67 Old 08-07-2011, 08:16 AM
 
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I have to say that I am anxious about school starting.  I posted in another thread that we love summer here, and part of it is the relief from the intensity of the school year.

 

My middle school dd w/dyslexia is actually doing very, very well in school, but adlolescence and managing an LD is a big job.  I am constantly in awe of how hard she works.  We are currently struggling with knowing when to push, when not to, etc.  It's just not that clear cut because there's a fine line where higher expectations move into the world of too much frustration.  It's like fine tuning an instrument in terms of getting the right balance, and it's really important for us to be vigilent about it.  She lo0ves school however, has good friends, and gets good grades, so that's a big plus.

 

My younger, high achieveing, ds continues to struggle with written output.  We have got to come to some place of understanding about this, for his sake, this year.  I am not feeling great about the situation this year, which is a change because we've previously had really good experiences.

 

Sorry to not have more enthusiasm.  It just feels complicated, and I personally need to be in the mindset for it.  Sun is shining, we're still on vacation, so that's where my head is at!

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#22 of 67 Old 08-15-2011, 10:41 AM
 
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my dd1, age 6, is starting school this year for the first time, after being homeschooled for JK & K. This is a big step for her, but it feels like the right decision for our family and after 2 years at home and OT for her sensory issues I think she is ready. I have the normal jitters of a parent sending her kid off to school for the first time, I think. Dd is an anxious kid, but did so well at a 1 week day camp this year, after a nervous start she LOVED it and we are very encouraged by this. Her SPD is relatively mild, though auditory sensitivity is definitely an issue. I'm not really sure how much to say to the teacher before hand b/c I'm not sure if she will need a lot of accommodation or not, she tends to be the kid who keeps it together really well in groups only to crash when she is at home. 

I'm excited for all that she is going to learn, plus she really really likes being around other kids so I think she will like this part of school.

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#23 of 67 Old 08-18-2011, 08:08 AM
 
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I'd like to join! DS (3) will be starting therapy this year at a pre-school for special needs children. I do feel nervous and had no intention of starting him this early, but I think he needs the help and therapy.

 

One issue I have is putting him on the bus. I feel nervous putting him in the care of a bus driver who I don't know. I feel that they don't have qualifications to work with children and to protect children this young. Basically, it's just someone with a bus drivers license. It's very scary to me. Wish we had another car so I could take him.

 

Thanks for starting this thread, Linda!


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#24 of 67 Old 08-18-2011, 09:38 AM
 
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Any of your kids go to schools where uniforms are required? Our school is starting them this year. Basic stuff - just white polo shirts and navy pants. I'm worried a bit because DD really LOVES color. Everything she wears is technicolor with stripes, splashes of color and rainbow patterns. I don't know how she'll cope with day-in and day-out sameness.


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#25 of 67 Old 08-18-2011, 09:45 AM
 
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Ds(13) will be starting 8th grade this September on an IEP plan. He was on one for grade 5 and 6th and really thrived getting good grades.  We took him off the IEP for grade 7 and he still managed to get a b average.  However we recently  had him reassessed by a new psychologist who recommended he go back on one.

His case is special. I’ll try not to go into great detail here. Basically he got a late start because he was at a Waldorf school first. This went badly and around this same time we found out he had Sensory Processing disorder. The transition to a traditional school went fairly well considering how far behind he was academically; nevertheless the school still recommended a psychological educational assessment which we did. At the time I did not feel they were taking the fact that he got such a late start into consideration. Also the Psychologist did not even know what SPD was.  His evacuation was no LD but ADD which I never really found accurate for him. Nevertheless a lot of the suggestions for ADD, like avoiding distractions, placing them in the front, worked for his SPD too, so the IEP helped.

When we decided to get him a new assessment I must admit that we were really hoping they would find out he did not have anything at all, so it did come as a surprise that the new psychologist (who I had a much better feeling about) said because of the large differences in the results of the various tests including I.Q., he did indeed have a learning Disorder. For example in verbal reasoning he is up in the 93rd percentile but his reading comprehension is way below  in the lower 10th.

 I am somewhat confused by the diagnose of a Non Verbal Learning Disability as he has never had any trouble recognising faces of people or in directions.    Nevertheless I think it is definitely for the best that he go back on an IEP.

 

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#26 of 67 Old 08-18-2011, 09:55 AM
 
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We are headed to school for the first time!

 

I have twin DDs that will be in 1st grade on 504s (one possibly on an IEP), one for medical needs and one for SPD/gross motor delays (dx CP- presents as major fatigue and poor coordination).

 

They are excited and I am nervous that the school will be a good fit for them both for Spec.Needs and academically.

 

So far the principal seems super nice, so that has great potential.

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#27 of 67 Old 08-18-2011, 10:00 AM
 
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Jalilah:

 

Quote:
Basically he got a late start because he was at a Waldorf school first.

 

I had seriously considered a Waldorf school for DD because of her SPD and ASD. There wasn't one within driving distance for us and we'd have had to make a move to do it, so I looked into other options and found something I *hope* will work for her. But I'm curious to know how the Waldorf school failed your son, if you feel like sharing. No pressure, though!


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#28 of 67 Old 08-18-2011, 10:26 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachcomber View Post

Any of your kids go to schools where uniforms are required? Our school is starting them this year. Basic stuff - just white polo shirts and navy pants. I'm worried a bit because DD really LOVES color. Everything she wears is technicolor with stripes, splashes of color and rainbow patterns. I don't know how she'll cope with day-in and day-out sameness.



Can you do colored socks, hair bows, etc? I know at a school I worked at there was some flexibility for accessories....a lot of girls wore fun socks, hair bows/scruncies, glittery sneakers, nail polish, shoe laces, tights etc.

 

They were fairly lax as long as kiddos had a white top on and navy or khaki bottoms (skirt, pants, etc).

 

Some places are more strict though. Ask. If not , have her lay out 'after' school clothes she can change into right away with all the color she might want! =]

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#29 of 67 Old 08-18-2011, 01:35 PM
 
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I don’t want to generalize because of course all schools depend on the individual staff and teachers, however that  being said, IMO Waldorf is the worst place to send a special needs child. They are not equipped for it and not up to date with all the new research. Although  it was  ironically  my son’s Waldorf teacher who handed me a copy of The Out of Sync Child, when we finally did see an OT and get a diagnose she did not want to know anything about it and would not even meet the OT!

Here are some links to some old threads concerning Waldorf:

http://www.mothering.com/community/t/368640/a-safe-healthy-haven-waldorf-questioners-concerns-thread

 http://www.mothering.com/community/t/683104/life-after-waldorf-a-support-group

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by beachcomber View Post

Jalilah:

 

 

I had seriously considered a Waldorf school for DD because of her SPD and ASD. There wasn't one within driving distance for us and we'd have had to make a move to do it, so I looked into other options and found something I *hope* will work for her. But I'm curious to know how the Waldorf school failed your son, if you feel like sharing. No pressure, though!



 

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#30 of 67 Old 08-18-2011, 04:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachcomber View Post

Jalilah:

 

 

I had seriously considered a Waldorf school for DD because of her SPD and ASD. There wasn't one within driving distance for us and we'd have had to make a move to do it, so I looked into other options and found something I *hope* will work for her. But I'm curious to know how the Waldorf school failed your son, if you feel like sharing. No pressure, though!

My dd has dyslexia, and the waldorf school was a disaster.  It was two fold:  the first is that they start academics so late that you have missed the chance for early intervention.  In fact, the school, and an "antroposophical doctor" failed to understand the basic, early signs of dyslexia, which in retrospect, were incredibly clear cut.  The second is that there weren't any teachers, including the remedial teachers, who understood language based LD's with any degree of competency, and therefore, could not work with kids who needed reading assistance.  The "help" consisted primarily of special "antroposophical" exercises and chants.  

 

The happy end of the story is that exceptional public school teachers put things on an even course, and my dd is doing very, very well.

 


 

 

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