Any diet or other non-convential treatments for ADHD? - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 13 Old 08-22-2011, 05:25 PM - Thread Starter
 
monkeybum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Toronto, ON (Canada)
Posts: 697
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I sometimes wonder if my DS would be considered ADHD if assessed, but I don't think he actually is.  But he is VERY busy.  I'm wondering if there are some food/diet or other behavioural (i.e. non medication) things I can do to help him, well, just settle down.

 

He CANNOT sit still.  He is 7.  It is like he has an "on" and "off" switch.  When he's tired, he falls right to sleep and nothing will wake him.  When he's awake, he is like the Energizer Bunny x 10.  He moves constantly.  If he's talking to grandma on the phone, he is walking around the room (over the coffee table, across the couch, behind the tv, he does laps).  He's constantly running through the house, jumping on the bed, couch, chair, whatever is nearby.  Or throwing things.

 

When he's watching tv even, he is constantly moving, he'll stand up, sit down, lie down, roll on to his tummy, then his back, then hang upside down, then start over again. During dinner he is up and down off his chair constantly.  His report card also commented that he does not seem to be able to sit still.  They also said that he is very active and that we should enroll him in extracurricular sports, (they say he's very athletic, but also VERY busy and energetic).  It's like he's this little ball of energy and sometimes he'll even just go "waaah" or "blaaah" and do like he's running on the spot very fast and wagging his arms and hands like he just can't get the energy out.

 

He's never liked crafts or printing or anything else that requires a lot of focus and sitting still.  He is a good reader and LOVES math, but he prefers to do it standing up and he is constantly moving around as he does his work.  Unfortunately this doesn't go over well at the public school where they have to sit at their desk.

 

We have a big backyard and he's involved in sports so I try to keep him active, but he seems to have endless energy.  I'm wondering if avoiding certain foods (or feeding him certain foods) would help, or having him do yoga, or avoiding tv or ??

 

Any ideas or BTDT that helped?

 

 

monkeybum is offline  
#2 of 13 Old 08-22-2011, 07:16 PM
 
reezley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,129
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Similar almost-7yo over here.  He'll be starting 1st grade and I wonder how it's going to go!  I'll be watching this thread.  Sorry I have no ideas for you myself. 

reezley is offline  
#3 of 13 Old 08-22-2011, 07:18 PM
 
Kristin0105's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 942
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I don't have time to write the detailed information your post requires but my quick answer is:

 

diet

diet

diet

Eat a whole foods diet, avoid artificial colors, sweeteners, etc... For some kids sugar, white bread etc... is a problem for others not so much. If they are going to have sugar they should have protein first.

 

Fish oil and borage oil supplements have proven to be effective for many. You want at least 1,000 units dha and 1,000 epa in your fish oil. Vitamin D may be helpful.

 

Some kids benefit from a smidge of coffee in the am before school. (No sugar)

 

Physical activity 2 hours or more a day of active, physical activity, running, jumping, biking, playing hard, skating (you get the picture). 

 

Traditional Chinese Medicine with acupuncture. Hope this gives you some avenues to explore.


chicken3.gifdog2.gifcat.gifenergy.gif
Kristin0105 is offline  
#4 of 13 Old 08-22-2011, 08:35 PM
 
Jenni1894's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: near chicago
Posts: 282
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

That's my son to a tee.....  he is also 7.

I've cut out all preservatives, artifical and dyes.   I make a lot of things from scratch and don't buy cookies, gummies, chips, ice cream..etc.   I have not done dairy or gluten yet, but I can certainly see an improvement in his attention span and craziness.  lol

Check out the Feingold diet. 

 

 


Mommy to 3 gifts from God! 
Nate dog 5/15/04
Lil' G 11/8/07
My Shamrock 3/17/10
ribbonpink.gif
Jenni1894 is offline  
#5 of 13 Old 08-23-2011, 07:57 AM
 
Emmeline II's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 8,832
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Just FYI, there are several of us here with ADHD children on medication; we don't "drug them up," we give them their prescribed dose to help them get to the point where they are able to respond to behavioral modifications. My son is not a "zombie," sluggish, or flat on medication. I think most parents try many diet and behavioral modifications before turning to medication.

 

If you don't want the school to know you can get a private evaluation. A psychiatrist is quicker to get into but I'd also due a more in depth evaluation at a behavior clinic that includes a developmental-behavioral pediatrician and a speech-language pathologist. But, a 504 plan can put accommodations like standing when working in writing, or extra physical activity during the day. In any case, not having a diagnosis or telling the school about a diagnosis doesn't mean he won't be labeled, he may just acquire unofficial labels.

 

ADHD is caused by deficiencies of dopamine and norepinephrine (or abnormalities in receptors for them). This part I haven't researched myself, it came from another ADHD parent: both dopamine and norepinephrine are synthesized by neurons (brain cells) using L-tyrosine. L-tyrosine is one of the amino acids that make up the protein in the food we eat. Therefore, by adopting a high protein diet, we can increase our production of dopamine and neuroepinephrine. Also, that many adhd people have an abnormality in how they metabolize glucose which means that when these people eat sugar, the amount of glucose in their brains actually decreases, meaning that brain cells have less energy and decreases their function.

 

There are things that can cause ADHD like symptoms or aggravate them such as food sensitivities, food coloring and flavoring sensitivities, cleaning chemicals, and lack of quality sleep (a sleep study can help determine if he has any sleep issues that are not obvious to you).

 

http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/guide/adhd-causes

Under IDEA/IEP, if your child has a disability that adversely affects educational performance, your child is entitled to an education that is designed to meet the child's unique needs and from which your child receives educational benefit.

 

A 504 is helping your child get the same education that everyone else is getting--more for a student that needs accommodations to help them learn (like sitting next to the teacher) or for behavior, and that they are not punished for things that they cannot control due to the ADHD (like needing to work standing up or not sit inside a group).

Key Differences Between Section 504, the ADA, and the IDEA.

 

(http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/sec504.summ.rights.htm)

 

Key Differences Between Section 504 and IDEA

(http://www.wrightslaw.com/howey/504.idea.htm)


Is a Child with ADD/ADHD Eligible for Special Education? - Wrightslaw

"It should be a rule in all prophylactic work that no harm should ever be unnecessarily inflicted on a healthy person (Sir Graham Wilson, The Hazards of Immunization, 1967)."
Emmeline II is offline  
#6 of 13 Old 08-23-2011, 03:04 PM
 
RiverTam's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: St. Louis, Missouri, USA
Posts: 935
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

You might want to take a look at the Eides' book "The Mislabeled Child." They have information on treatment, including a caution on drug treatment.

http://www.amazon.com/Mislabeled-Child-Understanding-Learning-Success/dp/1401302254

 

The Mayo Clinic website has an evaluation of non-drug treatments that have been tried:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/adhd/DS00275/DSECTION=alternative-medicine

 

There's some support for using B vitamins, fish oil, caffeine, and exercise as interventions, but the evidence to support them as interventions is limited. Some kids have good results with martial arts classes.

RiverTam is offline  
#7 of 13 Old 08-23-2011, 08:47 PM - Thread Starter
 
monkeybum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Toronto, ON (Canada)
Posts: 697
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Thanks.  I'm sorry if I offended anyone with the drugged up comment, I saw an episode of 20/20 one time, that is my very limited knowledge of it I admit, but they showed all these kids diagnosed with ADHD being given drugs and then it showed how it zoned them out and made them "flat" like you describe.  It kind of scared me so I wanted to explore other avenues first.  Obviously I don't know enough about it to really have an opinion either way though I admit! :)

 

I did notice a huge difference in his behavior when we eliminated dairy, but he's a fussy eater and it's so hard to find anything he'll eat, let alone wheat-dairy-colour-preservative-etc. free.

 

If I knew it would help I would do it though!  Maybe I'll try it again and see if I can get him to change his palate...

 

monkeybum is offline  
#8 of 13 Old 08-24-2011, 06:41 AM
 
melissa17s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: ia
Posts: 2,157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Monkeybum, different people process different drugs in ways that can be positive or negative.  I do not think it is unusual to try a few different medications to find the right fit so that you child gets the best from it instead of the bad side effects.  I also think it is important to be seeking the services of psychiatric professionals while on the meds because meds alone are a less effective route.  

 

Glad to know changes in food have had a positive effect on your ds's behavior.  

 

There are different ways to modify behavior and work with kids without drugs, too. You might consider going to a psychologist or psychiatrist that works with kids that have adhd- not for meds, but therapy, advice or counseling.  We have chosen this option for our ds because he takes other medication that is less effective with adhd meds.  Ds's psychologist is working on replacing behaviors that are disruptive with less disruptive.  Such as, when ds is excited/ worried he will jump and run or pace, like at home if we are watching a movie or even at school.  Now, if he has that urge, he has a small ball that he is supposed to pass back and forth from one hand to the other... we are just starting this, so can not tell if it works, yet.  Originally, psych wanted him to tap his feet back and forth or pat hands similarly, but has now changed to ball because ds did not like first 2 options.  We also have a balance disk, which he sits on to do homework, eat, etc. and this helps him concentrate.  He had it at school last year, but we are trying to go with out it because he felt singled out last year.  

 

 

melissa17s is offline  
#9 of 13 Old 08-24-2011, 06:44 AM
 
Emmeline II's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 8,832
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeybum View Post

Thanks.  I'm sorry if I offended anyone with the drugged up comment, I saw an episode of 20/20 one time, that is my very limited knowledge of it I admit, but they showed all these kids diagnosed with ADHD being given drugs and then it showed how it zoned them out and made them "flat" like you describe. 

 

If that is the result, then it is the wrong dosage or medication, or perhaps they had the wrong diagnosis to start with. A lot of parents start out with that opinion (we did) and go through the other options until medication is the only one left untried.

 

I have known a couple of parents whose children said they felt "flat" on the medication, but they were in a situation where they had tried all the other meds and their symptoms were too severe to go without the medication--though that is the exception, not the rule.

 

Ds had seen a family therapist prior to medication but it did not help him (though we got some benefit from it). He started seeing a CBT at the same time he started medication, but did not show much progress until the second medication. Ds was beyond hyper, he was physically aggressive in addition to the other ADHD symptoms. He barely made it through Kindergarten--spent a lot of time in ISS and had out of school suspension at least twice. Towards the end of Kindergarten we did give him magnesium with his multi-vitamin which took the edge off his most hyper behavior and kept him from literally running in circles all day. Now, in addition to his medication we give him an Omega-3 DHA supplement which seems to put him over the edge into predominately good behavior.

 

I'd be careful about considering caffeine as a "non-medication" treatment. It can be a potent short-acting stimulant; tolerance can require larger doses to get the same result and it can have similar side effects to medication ("crashes," headaches, lack of motivation, listlessness).

 

You may want to have him evaluated for sleep issues (such as a sleep study) even before trying a significant dietary change. Sometimes hyperactivity can be a person's way of keeping stimulated despite lack of quality sleep. 


"It should be a rule in all prophylactic work that no harm should ever be unnecessarily inflicted on a healthy person (Sir Graham Wilson, The Hazards of Immunization, 1967)."
Emmeline II is offline  
#10 of 13 Old 08-25-2011, 01:21 PM
 
RiverTam's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: St. Louis, Missouri, USA
Posts: 935
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

There's also this book on herbal and holistic approaches:

 

http://www.amazon.com/ADHD-Alternatives-Approach-Attention-Hyperactivity/dp/1580172482/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1314303571&sr=8-1

 

Herbs are drugs, though, as is caffeine.

RiverTam is offline  
#11 of 13 Old 09-05-2011, 07:21 AM - Thread Starter
 
monkeybum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Toronto, ON (Canada)
Posts: 697
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Thanks, I don't think he really has ADD, or if he does it is not causing any problems, (he has straight A's in school) but he just never sits still.  I was looking more for dietary or lifestyle changes that will help him just be a little less "busy", as I do find a direct relation to how much sugar, dairy and food colouring he consumes and his level of engery. Wondering if anyone has any other things they have seen that have helped a child to manage their energy, with limiting tv, certain exercises etc.  Not planning on going the drug route as it is not really a problem, more of a question about calming him down...or helping him focus his energy.

 

monkeybum is offline  
#12 of 13 Old 09-05-2011, 10:39 AM
 
melissa17s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: ia
Posts: 2,157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeybum View Post

Thanks, I don't think he really has ADD, or if he does it is not causing any problems, (he has straight A's in school) but he just never sits still.  I was looking more for dietary or lifestyle changes that will help him just be a little less "busy", as I do find a direct relation to how much sugar, dairy and food colouring he consumes and his level of engery. Wondering if anyone has any other things they have seen that have helped a child to manage their energy, with limiting tv, certain exercises etc.  Not planning on going the drug route as it is not really a problem, more of a question about calming him down...or helping him focus his energy.

 


There is nothing wrong with getting healthy.  Many kids need physical activity to learn and eating less sugar benefits everyone.  Some kids are just busy and do not truly have adhd, which is both over and under dx depending on the situation/individual. Many kids with adhd are straight A students.  They can be gifted and have high i.q.s.  Adhd is rarely fixed by just changing diet or activity level alone.  If you ds's behavior does become a problem because the bad is outweighing the good, then consider getting him evaluated; regardless of whether or not it is adhd, you could get options from a professional to help, too.  http://www.help4adhd.org/en/about/what/WWK1 and http://www.chadd.org/Content/CHADD/Understanding/Symptoms/default.htm 

 

melissa17s is offline  
#13 of 13 Old 09-05-2011, 11:21 AM
 
Mylie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,525
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)

check out the Feingold Program..It helps kids to certain degrees..My son was on it for years and it helped so much...We still did meds too but his problems went beyond being unable to phsically sit still for awhile..If you took out dairy and it helped you are on the right road...Good luck..

 

www.feingold.org

 

Mylie is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off