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#1 of 7 Old 07-09-2012, 12:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My son was just diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder and I'm pretty upset. He's a really intelligent kid who I thought had just a speech disorder/delay...I got him diagnosed via Prompt specialists. First a ST, then a OT. I go speak to her tomorrow.

I read the Symptons and can only relate to a few....he's 4 and I really want him to have a full life.

Please share words of expirence, comfort and truths to me.

I'm scared for him. Utterly heart-breaking for me.

~ Loka Samasta Sukino Bhavantu ~
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#2 of 7 Old 07-09-2012, 12:26 PM
 
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hug2.gif  Take a deep breath!  SPD presents differently for different people.  The fact that you are only seeing certain symptoms seems like a very good sign.  Many many people with SPD live completely full "normal" lives.  It can also affect different senses, often not all of them.  What senses do you feel are affected?  Also, with OT and ST, it is very likely that he will learn how to deal with these symptoms! 

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#3 of 7 Old 07-09-2012, 01:30 PM
 
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My oldest son has SPD and is "normal" in all aspects of development. Some things are just harder for him to handle (loud places, such as birthday parties, movie theatres). We've worked hard with him when he was little to get him to verbalize his issues. He learned very young to say to friends "I need alone time now" or to know when he had enough of an activity and stop. He had a lot of melt downs prior to learning these skills. He has no problem at this point (he's 9) telling people that he "doesn't do" 3D movies for example.
His main lingering issues are phobias of dentists, extreme pickiness, strong gag reflex (I guess all oral issues). However how he functions in his daily life is seldom affected. I think with SPD the preschool years are most dramatic. Fwiw my dh has it too and other than the fact that he wears ear plugs most of the time you wouldn't know it

Don't worry, it will be ok

SAHM to one moody son J hat.gif(06-27-03), one super-girly daughter M hearts.gif (02-23-06) and welcome Sophie! energy.gif(05-23-10) expecting fourth in July baby.gif

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#4 of 7 Old 07-10-2012, 03:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belove View Post

he's 4 and I really want him to have a full life.
 

 

Sensory processing disorder can be a bit of a pain figure out, but it isn't something that stops people from having a full life. My older DD has sensory issues (as well as other special needs) and I'm 100% sure that DH does as well. He is an executive at an aerospace firm, happily married winky.gif, and has as full of a life as he can stand!

 

SPD doesn't hinder one's ability to have a full life, not at all. BUT (and this is a big but) there are somethings that many of us consider fun and important that aren't fun to some people with SPD. It's different things for different people, so I'd rather not get you concerned with the list for my DD and DH. There are certain places that aren't fun for them, and certain activities that are triggers rather than joys.

 

So we do different things. It really isn't that big of deal (once we got it figured out). There are plenty of ways to have fun that actually work for all the members of my family. Nature and mellow activities work well for us, so we picnic a lot go for short easy hikes rather than things that overwhelm our kid. It's still a full life, it's just full of other things.


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#5 of 7 Old 07-11-2012, 09:13 AM
 
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Now... this is just my opinion and the only advanced degree I hold is a M.O.M. :) but....

 

everyone has SPD.  Don't think so?  Walk through any office - count the number of chewed up pens and pencils on people's desks.  How many people are bouncing their legs at their desks?  How many people do you know who are picky eaters or only like certain kinds of clothes?  How many people do you know that HATE turtleneck sweaters because they are strangling in them?  The list is endless.

 

There are levels to SPD.  What I described above is considered "normal".  However it's still a sensory response to a person's environment.  Labels are like stickers.  You slap it on, wear it for as long as you need to get the help you need and then peal it off and toss it in the trash.  All disorders, developmental delays and even diseases are a spectrum.  There are some kids with sensory issues that are mild and easily managed.  There are some kid who's sensory issues are so severe it puts them in harm's way.  There is a whole lot in between.  The great news is your child is getting help, seems to fall on the "very manageable" part of the spectrum of SPD and has an obviously loving mother.  

 

I know it's scary to hear these words but just remember, he's the same adorable 4 year old he was before you even heard about SPD and hearing those words, getting OT isn't going to change a thing.  It's only going to give him the skills he needs to succeed.  Special needs doesn't mean unintelligent - it just means that they may learn a bit differently than the average kid or may need help in certain areas. {{{hugs}}}


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#6 of 7 Old 07-13-2012, 06:53 AM
 
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Just want to chime in with a hug... DS doesn't have a diagnosis but has been getting OT for sensory issues for about 3 years now. It was really tough for me too when they first brought up OT--I was totally resistant, but it has helped DS and our lives in so many ways. And DS is very smart, has friends, is doing well--the OT (and he gets speech too) just help support him. I wish I could get OT for myself--I totally melt down around loud sounds, for example.
 


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#7 of 7 Old 07-13-2012, 09:57 AM
 
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Originally Posted by SpottedFoxx View Post

Now... this is just my opinion and the only advanced degree I hold is a M.O.M. :) but....


I know it's scary to hear these words but just remember, he's the same adorable 4 year old he was before you even heard about SPD and hearing those words, getting OT isn't going to change a thing.  It's only going to give him the skills he needs to succeed.  Special needs doesn't mean unintelligent - it just means that they may learn a bit differently than the average kid or may need help in certain areas. {{{hugs}}}

 

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