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#1 of 17 Old 09-22-2012, 05:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My nine year old was recently tested for dyslexia.  We requested it, because she has trouble with reading comprehension, and when working with her I noticed she was making mistakes like seeing "clam" for "calm" and having similar issues. 

 

Anyway, they said after testing her that she does NOT have dyslexia, but that she scored one point below average on the IQ test.

 

My daughter has always had behavioral, emotional and sensory issues (seemed to start after a vaccine reaction,) but we've never questioned her intelligence.  She's been reading since she was 18 months old, and has always excelled in math.

 

 

So I guess my question is...should this IQ result worry me?  Should I have her re-tested?  What does it mean for her exactly?

 

 

**bummed out**


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#2 of 17 Old 09-22-2012, 06:47 PM
 
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whats wrong with average? they didn't say she tested near the bottom or anything. Im just wondering what your concern would be? is it just hat you, maybe unconsciously, expected her to test much higher?


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#3 of 17 Old 09-22-2012, 07:01 PM
 
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It sounds like you are saying your child tested at 99 for IQ, is that correct? I understand why you would feel dismayed and worried. In our culture, average IQ (100) can put you at a disadvantage when it comes to employment, etc.

 

However, its hard to accurately test a child that young. Its also very difficult to accurately test a child who also has sensory and emotional lability. If she began reading at 18 mths, and is excelling in math, she does not have an average IQ.

 

One IQ test doesn't tell much, anyway. Give it a year and have her tested again if it worries you, but it sounds to me like you can trust your own instincts regarding her intelligence over one I.Q. test.

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#4 of 17 Old 09-22-2012, 08:31 PM - Thread Starter
 
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whats wrong with average? they didn't say she tested near the bottom or anything. Im just wondering what your concern would be? is it just hat you, maybe unconsciously, expected her to test much higher?

 

Well, for starters, I didn't even know they were planning to test her IQ.  Not that it changes anything re: the results of the test; it's more that I feel a bit out of the loop when it comes to school matters.

 

So the sting of finding out her IQ was tested without my being informed was then compounded by the fact that she scored below average, when she has always demonstrated outstanding intellectual ability since a very young age.


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#5 of 17 Old 09-22-2012, 08:33 PM - Thread Starter
 
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It sounds like you are saying your child tested at 99 for IQ, is that correct? I understand why you would feel dismayed and worried. In our culture, average IQ (100) can put you at a disadvantage when it comes to employment, etc.

 

However, its hard to accurately test a child that young. Its also very difficult to accurately test a child who also has sensory and emotional lability. If she began reading at 18 mths, and is excelling in math, she does not have an average IQ.

 

One IQ test doesn't tell much, anyway. Give it a year and have her tested again if it worries you, but it sounds to me like you can trust your own instincts regarding her intelligence over one I.Q. test.

Yes...they said one point below average.  

 

Thanks for mentioning the limitations of the test given to a child with certain issues and at a certain age.  I will probably try not to worry too much more about it, and have her retested sometime in the future.


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#6 of 17 Old 09-23-2012, 08:52 AM
 
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Excuse me for being a bit flippant here, but the main thing an IQ test measures is the ability to take an IQ test. A difference of one point (or 5 or 10) means VERY little. And, contrary to what they tell you, it can and does change over time. YoungSon tested at 72 at age 7, and now at 16 tests at 115. He had mondo-dyslexia , read at 2nd grade level at age 13, and last week passed the state reading test for high school graduation. With little to no effective interventions (long story - we tried everything in the elementary years, but with no impact). He was diagnosed with ASD, SPD, anxiety, and I don't remember what all else over the years.

 

There are many aspects to intelligence, and even more to functioning in life, especially outside the artificial environment of school. Few if any strengths and weaknesses that are measured in numbers on these tests are accurate predictors of lifetime success. I am not totally discounting the value of evaluations and diagnoses. The results can be guideposts to what areas may need extra support or specialized methods. Or just extra patience for the child to mature on their own schedule. But please don't take any of the results too seriously. Test scores should not be life sentences.

 

My YoungSon is only 16, so it is early to say he has "succeeded". Hell, at 55 I don't feel like a finished product yet! biggrinbounce.gif But 10 years ago, I could not have predicted how well he would be doing today. And test results were certainly no clue.
 

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#7 of 17 Old 09-23-2012, 09:02 AM
 
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Excuse me for being a bit flippant here, but the main thing an IQ test measures is the ability to take an IQ test. A difference of one point (or 5 or 10) means VERY little. And, contrary to what they tell you, it can and does change over time. YoungSon tested at 72 at age 7, and now at 16 tests at 115. He had mondo-dyslexia , read at 2nd grade level at age 13, and last week passed the state reading test for high school graduation. With little to no effective interventions (long story - we tried everything in the elementary years, but with no impact). He was diagnosed with ASD, SPD, anxiety, and I don't remember what all else over the years.

 

There are many aspects to intelligence, and even more to functioning in life, especially outside the artificial environment of school. Few if any strengths and weaknesses that are measured in numbers on these tests are accurate predictors of lifetime success. I am not totally discounting the value of evaluations and diagnoses. The results can be guideposts to what areas may need extra support or specialized methods. Or just extra patience for the child to mature on their own schedule. But please don't take any of the results too seriously. Test scores should not be life sentences.

 

My YoungSon is only 16, so it is early to say he has "succeeded". Hell, at 55 I don't feel like a finished product yet! biggrinbounce.gif But 10 years ago, I could not have predicted how well he would be doing today. And test results were certainly no clue.
 

 

I agree. My 9 yo is dyslexic and also scored average on an IQ test but aside from her difficulties in school related to her dyslexia she is far from average. It's also unlikely that she is average in IQ because my younger dd is profoundly gifted and statistically it is rare to have such a large gap in scores between siblings. So I chalk it up to older dd just not being a good tester and possibly that her dyslexia, difficulties with directionality, and poor receptive language are suppressing her score.

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#8 of 17 Old 09-23-2012, 09:26 AM
 
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Is 99 her full scale IQ? have you been given a comprehensive test reports with subtest scores?

If you post those over on the Parenting the Gifted Child board, there are a number of parents of 2e (twice exceptional, ie gifted + a learning disability) kids who may help you interepret those scores and maybe help you get some perspective.


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#9 of 17 Old 09-23-2012, 10:27 AM
 
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Originally Posted by emma1325 View Post

 

Well, for starters, I didn't even know they were planning to test her IQ.  Not that it changes anything re: the results of the test; it's more that I feel a bit out of the loop when it comes to school matters.

 

So the sting of finding out her IQ was tested without my being informed was then compounded by the fact that she scored below average, when she has always demonstrated outstanding intellectual ability since a very young age.

 

 

I'm really sorry that they tested her without talking to you first. You sound like you feel really cut out of the loop. I can understand that, I would be pissed.

 

Do you know anything about what test were given to her, the sub test scores, etc? IQ testing isn't as cut and dry as most people think. I have 2 kids. This is how it works out for them:

 

DD#2 -- bright kid, no issues. Tested by the school in 3 areas. All three scores clustered together. The average of the scores seems like a pretty solid answer for her "IQ"

 

DD#1 -- gifted and on the autism spectrum. IQ tested in 6 areas by a private practice as part of a full evaluation. 40 point range from highest to lowest score. Which is just huge. This was at age 13. She had never had the really high scores before because when she was younger, she couldn't comply with the testing enough for them to find out much.

 

So, based on what you are saying about your DD, I wonder if she got the type of testing that DD#2 got, but she really needs something more like what DD#1 got. Our insurance paid for the private eval. You could check your plan and see what is covered.

 

BUT I agree with the poster who said 5 or 10 points isn't a big deal on an IQ test. Anything between about 90 and 110 is really average. Your DD scored average.

 

I just question if one number reflects her strengths and weakness, and if they did enough testing to figure out what is actually going on with her.


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#10 of 17 Old 09-23-2012, 10:30 AM
 
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whats wrong with average? they didn't say she tested near the bottom or anything. Im just wondering what your concern would be? is it just hat you, maybe unconsciously, expected her to test much higher?

 

Well, for starters, I didn't even know they were planning to test her IQ.  Not that it changes anything re: the results of the test; it's more that I feel a bit out of the loop when it comes to school matters.

 

So the sting of finding out her IQ was tested without my being informed was then compounded by the fact that she scored below average, when she has always demonstrated outstanding intellectual ability since a very young age.

that makes total sense, i was just asking what the reaction was about. clearly you understand her to be bright, so the test did not pick that up. it does not change her.

 

 i tested at the very very top of all my general testing in grand school 97-99% percentile every year, but i failed high school because of a what i believe was mostly just a learning style that conflicted with their teaching style and nobody taking the time to notice that i was failing.  So was i brilliant because of the test scores? Stupid because of my grades? Just "Failing to life up to my potential", as i was regularly lectured about? Or a bad case of what can slip thru the cracks with inattentive schools and overworked parents.

 

i guess i was trying to say two things, a single test given out of context shows little, good or bad.

and half of everyone on the planet according to what average means would test at or below what your daughter tested at, so that means lot of folks that clearly are quiet capable in life, dont test well either.


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#11 of 17 Old 09-23-2012, 12:51 PM
 
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An IQ test given by the school is likely to not have been a very in depth assessment-- a full pysch-ed assessment takes a number of hours and will give you a more complete picture of areas of relative and weakness. Because an IQ test combines different subtests, a child who is gifted in some areas (eg. verbally) but weak in others (eg. processing speed) may show a full scale IQ which is in the average range. For some kids, whose scores are scattered from very high to very low, a full scale IQ calculation is not appropriate or meaningful as it essentially masks both their giftedness and their disabilities. A child with an average IQ and a gifted child with learning disabilities may both show average FSIQ scores but need different types of learning support ... so I agree with the previous posters that you may need further assessment to get any useful information. I wouldn't be concerned about the IQ in itself but given that this doesn't seem to fit with what you know of your daughter, I would be concerned that a learning disability may have been missed in this assessment.


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#12 of 17 Old 09-26-2012, 07:31 AM
 
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Can I ask what her actual score was? Average is actually between 85 and 115 on most IQ tests. (Minus 15 to plus 15 from the mean of 100)

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#13 of 17 Old 09-26-2012, 11:37 AM
 
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Reading at 18 months is not indicative of a child in the normal IQ range.  You may want to read about "stealth dyslexia."  Sometimes intellectually gifted kids with dyslexia are very hard to diagnose because they compensate so well for their difficulties.  In response to the question in your topic--an IQ test's accuracy depends on the skill of the test administrator.  I'd probably look into private testing with someone familiar with working with gifted children if I were in your situation, not because finding an accurate number for her IQ is important, but to see if she genuinely does have some sort of learning disability. 
 

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#14 of 17 Old 09-26-2012, 04:49 PM
 
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My DS had an IQ test as part of a full private evaluation at age 5. His score on that test was completely average. I was much more stunned and upset about that than I was about his diagnosis with Asperger Syndrome (which I fully expected). It wasn't that I wasn't okay with him having an average IQ, but it just seemed so off from my experience of him. I felt like I was told that I didn't get my child.

 

He has since had two more IQ tests (one at 7 and one at 8) as a participant in university research studies. Both of those (different instruments -- he's now had Weschler, Stanford Binet, and one other that I don't remember right off hand) said his IQ is in the gifted range. I have no idea why the differences and I've decided that I don't really care. I characterize him as twice-exceptional (gifted and ASD) mostly because that is what I believe to be true and because that is what others who work with him say they experience.

 

All that is to say: I get where you are coming from. It's okay to be surprised and upset to hear something that doesn't mesh with your sense of your child. IQ tests can give radically different results at different ages, with different tests, and different evaluators. And, in general, mamas know their kiddos best. smile.gif
 

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#15 of 17 Old 09-26-2012, 05:21 PM
 
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If it helps, I once had an Autistic student (age 4) who was fluent - and read on an upper grade-school level - in two languages; who made lists of the dates the seasons change over the course of however many years he could cover before someone redirected him; and who, if you told him your birthdate and age, would blurt out the day of the week on which you were born.  He did this as instantaneously and accurately as a computer (but much more joyfully).  In his mind, he saw the pattern in the calendar, regardless how many years you were talking about.  He tested below average on IQ tests - and not by a point or two.  

 

IQ tests are designed for "normal" people.  Whether a kid has dyslexia, emotional issues or something else, if they are out of the ordinary, their IQ scores may be affected by their uniqueness.

 

On the other hand, I didn't place much stock in my twins' IQ scores when they were young because I knew their Autistic traits affected their test-taking abilities.  Funny example:  one son, as a preschooler, was asked to read a list of letters.  *I* knew he knew every letter in the alphabet.  Let's say the letters were A-S-D-F-G-H-J.  He said - with an increasing dramatic flourish - "A, S, D, F, double-G, double-H, double-C, C, C, C!"  We were reading Charlotte's Web at home and he was imitating the Goose.  He didn't get credit for knowing his letters.  So I held out hope that their below-average IQs meant nothing.  But they didn't.  They have non-verbal learning disabilities.  They learned to speak and read more-or-less on track with their peers, but have massive struggles understanding abstract concepts, from math to why - if they walk in my door carrying an iPod, misplace it and have trouble finding it - they can't reasonably conclude it's at their Dad's.  

 

As it turns out, their IQ scores probably weren't far off.  And, deep down, I always knew that.  I just hoped someone else knew better, or that there was some way to discount those who didn't know better.

 

Whether tests are right or wrong, the bottom line is you're the parent.  When you're worried about your child's development, it's natural to wish there were some expert with a crystal ball who knew vastly more than you do and could tell you for sure how things will play out, so you can be prepared.  But I've found that's not how it works.  Most of the time, experts can offer a functional vocabulary for things you already know about your child.  

 

If you know she's intelligent, a test can't change what you've observed.  If you are upset by the thought that she has "only" average intelligence, you might ask yourself why that upsets you so much.  One point below average is, for all practical purposes, average.  Ask what the range of error is, on the test.  Chances are, if she took it on a different day, in a slightly better mood, she might be five points above average.  That's still basically average.  And if that turns out to be accurate, that's great!    So many people are wonderful, lovable and valuable, with much less.  And some exceptionally-smart kids out there are arrogant about it and slack off, driving their parents crazy.  A daughter with average intelligence who's been interested in learning since toddlerhood is a blessing.


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#16 of 17 Old 09-26-2012, 05:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Cassidy68 View Post... so I agree with the previous posters that you may need further assessment to get any useful information. I wouldn't be concerned about the IQ in itself but given that this doesn't seem to fit with what you know of your daughter, I would be concerned that a learning disability may have been missed in this assessment.

 

I agree. I would not rely on a school assessment for anything unless I had no other options.

 

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#17 of 17 Old 10-22-2012, 02:34 PM
 
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I didn't know you could do an IQ test without parental consent! 

 

I wouldn't read too much into an IQ test anyway.     

 

I'm hoping an IQ test was NOT the sole basis of deciding your child DOESN'T have dyslexia...because you need a really good READING assessment to determine that.  And dyslexia doesn't have much to do with IQ.  (Perhaps the IQ test was just one of the assessments used?  To rule out an intellectual disability?)

 

I would definitely seek another evaluation if you still suspect a LD like dyslexia (in spite of what the school says) because LDs left untreated do NOT go away.  Students with LDs who don't receive appropriate interventions usually do very poorly in school.

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