Anyone with child diagnosed with Pediatric Mood Disorder/Bipolar? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 13 Old 02-16-2013, 11:23 AM - Thread Starter
 
lilgreen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 3,734
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)

I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this. Is this special needs?

 

I have struggled with ds1 (now age 11) since he was 18 months. He never grew out of his 'terrible twos' tantrums and they only got worse and worse. His younger brothers are perfectly fine and respond well to my parenting so it's not my parenting like everyone likes to suggest. There is something seriously wrong (different?) with ds1. He has been diagnosed with Anxiety NOS and at a different time with ODD but no one seems to really understand how serious and extreme his behaviours/moods are.

 

Another mdc mom recognized my son in the book 'Is My Child Bipolar?' I started reading it Thursday and I have been overwhelmed. When I shared some excerpts with my father (MD with extensive experience in psychiatry), he was so amazed he couldn't believe that I hadn't written it myself about ds1. So much fits.

 

You see, ds1 only ever rages at home and with me (and his little brothers). Never with his father and he's perfect and social at school. My father (the MD) is the only other person who has had glimpses of his irrational, absolute rage storms. But this fits with Bipolar. Ds1 is petrified of his father (abusive) and (perhaps consequently) anxious about authority figures at school.... so he holds it all in until he gets home to me where he feels safe enough to explode.

 

His father will not consent to further assessments, accusing me of bad parenting and of pathologizing the children. I'm not sure what I CAN do, but I know I have to do something. Poor ds1 is struggling so much - he is so violent and dangerous to me, himself and his brothers. Yet he later begs to know why he's like this and he is so remorseful that he hurts me.

 

I guess I'm looking for as much good information as I can get my hands on. I know there is controversy about pediatric bipolar, but I'm not so much concerned with getting a diagnosis as I am about finding the best way to treat his severe mood dysregulation (right word?) so that we can begin to treat whatever else is underlying his violent behaviours with effective therapy.

 

He is only with me 50% of the time unfortunately so there isn't much I can do consistently over the course of a week. But I'll take any suggestions, ideas, insights, btdt stories, etc. 

 

Thanks for listening.

lilgreen is offline  
#2 of 13 Old 02-16-2013, 12:23 PM
 
pattimomma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: The Dirty South
Posts: 1,178
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)

This is absolutely special needs! My DS does not have this diagnoses but I am familiar with it because my son's pediatric psychiatrist performs research in this area https://www.aacp.com/pdf%2F0211%2F0211ACP_Ghaemi.pdf

This article shows that pediatric bipolar disorder is often missed and underdiagnosed.

 

Others may disagree but most bipolar patients require medication. CBT or DBT (types of behavioral modification therapy) can only get you so far. You can also look into things like http://www.integratedlistening.com/ or https://www.interactivemetronome.com/ they are more commonly used for conditions other than bipolar but some clinicians use them for bipolar as well. Have you been keeping a mood chart? That will help in the diagnoses.

 

How does your custody agreement determine who is ultimately responsible for medical decisions and care? Often when custody is joint there will still be some terminology for when there is not a mutual agreement regarding care. For example when my youngest DS's father and I divorced I got sole physical custody and joint legal custody. The legal joint custody states that medical and educational decisions should be made jointly BUT if the parties do not agree the mother has the ultimate authority to make the decision.

 

This is going to be very important if you want to proceed. Where I live, one of the first questions on all the forms at the psychiatrist office is "Do you have legal authority and/or a custody arrangement that allows you to make medical decisions for the child". Some practices require a copy of your divorce decree or other document to be kept on file in order to avoid being sued by the other parent.

 

You could post in the mental health forum and maybe someone with bipolar can tell you what has helped them.

 

Keep us posted!
 


~Patti~ rainbow1284.gifMomma to three girls and three boys chicken3.gif, First mother to one girl triadadopt.jpg

Certified, card carrying member of the IEP Binder Clubkid.gif  

pattimomma is offline  
#3 of 13 Old 02-16-2013, 12:32 PM
 
livinglife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 210
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)

I pop over here because I have a son with PDD-NOS so I cannot speak from my personal parenting experience.  But, I'm a social worker/child therapist with experience working with children diagnosed with childhood bipolar. 

 

I would often hear the stories of extreme emotional disregulation.  But, I am wary of the diagnosis, I will admit.  I'm admitting this so you know my bias off the bat.  I am the kind of person who tries to seek behavioral, homeopathic and dietary solutions to problems in health and child development.

 

But, I have NO doubt that the emotional disregulation is real I just wouldn't in most instances have called it bipolar.  But, since the children I worked with were diagnosed by a psychiatrist and the families were very invested in the diagnosis I would work with what was presented.

 

It would trouble me however, because I would often be treating a whole family, and 9 times out of 10 there was a history of abuse either toward the child or witnessed by the child and attachment issues in the child due to one or both parents abandoning the child for a period of time. 

 

Often the family history would NOT be taken into account by the diagnosing psychiatrist and as a part of a mental health team working with the department of mental health, I and the other therapists would peel away at layers of family trauma to help not just the child but the whole family, each and every one of whom would be struggling emotionally just more quietly so.  Abuse and it's aftermath is something that each family member processes differently.  Acting out the trauma and becoming "the aggressor" is one way for a child to master the trauma.  This is important in understanding why a child behaves the way that they do. 

 

Is it important for you to get help?  Absolutely.  What kind of help is the question.  Do you need to see a psychiatrist and get a medication or do you get your son a trained trauma specialist?  Will he need both ultimately?  Maybe.  But I suggest that where you start is to ask yourself some questions.  You mentioned that his father is abusive.  Is this the father that he's with 50 percent of the time?  Is his father abusive toward the children or was he abusive to you?  If he were abusive to you does your son know that he was abusive or did he see abuse taking place?  Is it possible that your son is currently being abused?

 

These are difficult questions and it isn't important for you to answer them here on this forum.  I think it's important that you ask yourself these questions however in teasing out what is going on for your child.

 

Children who have witnessed abuse or who are being abused can act out their trauma.  That should not be treated like bipolar but it often is.  Please be careful to get your son treatment for trauma.  Ultimately if a bipolar diagnosis unfolds for him, as you say, it is less important than getting him and all of you help.  And remember, just because your son is the only one acting it out, doesn't mean that the other children and you don't have effects you struggle with, just maybe more "quietly".

 

I wish you strength and I hope you find the care and help you need. 
 

livinglife is offline  
#4 of 13 Old 02-16-2013, 01:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
lilgreen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 3,734
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)

Thank you pattimomma and livinglife. I am determined to help ds1 because it just breaks my heart to see him hurting so much.

 

Links are excellent for me, thank you! Also, the info about custody is good. We are in the midst of a massive court-ordered parenting evaluation by a psychologist who will make custody recommendations. I hope we have a final custody agreement by May. Until then, there is no agreement other than everything requires both of our consent. I had to get court ordered consent for ds1 to get assessed and then referred to family counselling in November after the police had to come and he made two trips to the Children's hospital for urgen psychiatric assessments.... and X still refused consent because it's simply my bad 'indulgent' parenting that's the problem. So, thank you for reassuring me it's not my parenting!

 

And livinglife - you are bang on with all of that. Bang on. Ds1 was physically abused until age 6 by his father and subsequently emotionally abused by him. His entire life he has witnessed verbal and emotional abuse against me. X tells him all kinds of bad things about me. Ds1 is clearly very tormented and upset by this. This has been all documented and is why the clinician who did an assessment of ds1 (in early Dec) and included this information, did not refer him to a mental health team but instead to a family counselling program. Starting in 2-3 weeks a counsellor will come to my home and X's home for a few hours every week to work with us. I have been reading Lundy Bancroft's book 'When Dad Hurst Mom' which makes a lot of sense to me and really applies.

 

But my question is about the cause and effect issue, and I don't know if you have any insight about this or not. I am curious if, because he is genetically predisposed to mental illness (on both sides), can his trauma be expressed through the manifestation of a mood disorder or other mental illness? In other words, what is the correlation between trauma and a mood disorder? Can trauma cause a mood disorder? Or do expressions of trauma get mistaken for symptoms of mood disorders?

 

Ds1's rages and irritability are so extreme that I can't imagine how he could possibly begin to do any kind of emotional work. I just don't know how to begin. I guess I don't really have any options at this point because I only have consent for the referral from the December assessment which is the in-home family counselling program. But I want to get as much information as possible... I may need to get a diagnosis at some point in order to get something to stabilize ds1's mood enough to begin to address the trauma, but that's all hypothetical at this point.

 

Also, my ds2 (age 7) is certainly struggling, too. But X won't consent for him to see any therapist/counsellor. I will certainly raise my concerns with the family counsellor and hopefully we can address it effectively.

 

Thanks again so much for your input, mamas! You're wonderful!

lilgreen is offline  
#5 of 13 Old 02-16-2013, 03:12 PM
 
livinglife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 210
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)

lilgreen, the issue as I see it is that the trauma is ongoing.  It sounds like you are doing everything you can in this process and I don't want to burden you with this perspective, but, your son's extreme emotional reactions are, in the context of your life, VERY understandable.  It's like if you had an important relative dying and saying you feel black and depressed.  Of course you do.  It's expected. 

 

Any trauma work has to take place when your child feels safe.  He needs to be made safe and protecting your son from aggression is the important thing right now.  It must feel terrible for you to have limited ability by the courts and divorce process to do that but I encourage you to do everything within the process taking place to protect your family.  I would imagine you have the help of a lawyer and know that you can call child social services to investigate what is happening in your soon to be ex's home.  And, meanwhile, while you cannot allow your son to harm you, you also can expect that his emotions will be disregulated.  I would work with the family therapist about trying to create as much consistency and safety as possible in your house which you do have control over, and contracting with your oldest about how he will handle his rage, what is acceptable to do with it, ways to express it without creating fear in other people and in himself. 

 

It is absolutely wonderful that he holds it together in school.  It isn't unusual that children struggling with abuse keep school as their safe place.  It is routine, controlled, ordered and predictable which is exactly what he needs.  He must soak it up like a flower in sunshine.  Just as an aside, if he did have childhood bipolar it would be unlikely in my experience that he would be as together as he is in school.  He would have a hard time regulating himself there too.

 

I don't really want to comment on whether a family predisposition triggered your son's extreme emotional state as a result of the abuse.  It's possible but it can be overcome and there can be healing and calm joy for him and for you all with a safe household and good loving care.  I prefer to look at things through a family systems lense whereby when there's volitility in the family life there is often an "identified patient" where one child or one person in the family takes on the majority of the suffering and symptoms.  Only when everyone in the family begins the work of creating healthy boundaries and expressing their feelings can you son's feelings come down to a lower pitch.  It may be that he will ultimately have a mental illness.  But many children who react with anger and frustration at abuse turn out ultimately to be emotionally healthy.  It is an extremely healthy reaction.  It's the way all of us feel when an injustice is done to us.  We all need safety, respect for boundaries, no abuse...that would be the first step in attempting to return to equilibrium.

 

I am genuinely sorry to hear all that you are struggling with.  I wish you strength and courage to manage and I hope that you have some good people around you to help.
 

livinglife is offline  
#6 of 13 Old 02-16-2013, 03:26 PM
 
Katielady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Living in a van down by the river
Posts: 2,048
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

My little sister has Bipolar 1. She wasn't diagnosed til she had a full manic break at 14, by which point I was away at college. But she showed signs of the disease from a very early age, and I think today she would have been diagnosed much earlier and would have received treatment. Like your son, she was able to control herself at school but not at home. She had some OCD tendencies but mostly would have intense, frightening rages. She came after me with a baseball bat when she was around 8 when she thought I was making fun of her for her performance in a school play; she was hovering over me with it while I lay on the ground covering my face and I'm not sure what would have happened if my dad hadn't pulled her away. It was tough for all of us, most of all her. Her core self is sweet and loving, and it's been such a joy to get to know her now that her disease is better under control. It took a long time. It's easier to control the mania than the depression, which in kids tends to manifest itself as extreme irritability. When she was 16 her then psychiatrist told my parents the reason she wasn't going to school was that she was angry about her diagnosis and was exhibiting "school refusal." On his recommendation they sent her to a survivalist boot camp in Idaho. It was extremely traumatic for her. Soon after that a new shrink diagnosed her with severe depression, which was the real reason she wasn't able to go to school. Once the depression was properly treated she got her GED and went on to community college and then a 4-year-school. She got her degree in sociology and wrote her thesis on why boot camps don't work. :(

 

I am so proud of her. I feel so sad about how inadequate her treatment was when she was small. Trust your gut, lilgreen! My mom had ALWAYS felt there was something chemically wrong with my sis, but despite her efforts she could never get the help she needed. Today, luckily, so much more is known about bipolar in children. Keep fighting! I know you've been through so much (I've been following your story and rooting for you!) but this is real, and worth persevering for. Your son will thank you for it, and your other kids too.

 

Feel free to PM me if you would like more info about growing up in a family with a child with bipolar.

 

Hugs to you, and to your son!
 


SAHM to 6.5yo DS and 4yo DD. PCOS with two early m/cs. Married 8 yrs. Certified birth doula, writer, editor.

Some stuff I like: hbac.gifteapot2.GIFeat.gifnocirc.gifbftoddler.giffemalesling.GIFcrochetsmilie.gif read.gifcat.gif

Katielady is offline  
#7 of 13 Old 02-16-2013, 09:05 PM
 
bakersmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have 3 sons and my oldest (13) has been diagnosed bipolar since he was 10. The signs/symptoms you are discribing are hauntingly familiar to me.
My oldest also has ADHD,mood disorder NOS, anxiety NOS, sensory integration disorder and hypovestibular. He too had symptoms at an early age. He was put into a special class at a different school in grade 2 and has moved back to a regular class at his home school this year! smile.gif (grade 7)
My son is 5'10 and 170 lbs...so when he "looses it" its scary. Since we agreed to try medications things have gotten less chaotic. Definitely not a cure, but more tolerable.
He is on Biphentin and Abilify (both low dosage) and they not only help him through his day, but they have helped regulate his sleep pattern. We also got him (and his school) into a technique/therapy called "Brain Gym" and it really seems to help.
My other sons are 6 & 8 and are "normal" but often mimic their brother which drives me bonkers!
I hope your ex(or a judge) conceed to atleast looking into help for your son.
You sound like a strong woman...keep your head high!
PM me anytime.
bakersmom is offline  
#8 of 13 Old 02-20-2013, 10:05 AM
 
heatherdeg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Everywhere... thanks, technology!
Posts: 4,888
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)

I would be cautious about banking on the genetic predisposition.  I had an underlying insulin disorder that was missed and misdiagnosed for 17 years based not only on genetic predisposition to bipolar (my mother has it) but also based on my upbringing (we were a CPS "slip through the cracks" story for sure).

 

But my now 9yo started really looking bipolar and I started wondering if my mother's condition genetically predisposed him.  He sounds very much like you--never having grown out of the terrible twos.  Age four was so bad that I had to video tape him so that people would believe me.  He was usually really good outside of the home, but in retro, part of this was sensory-related: he was more overwhelmed outside of his comfort zone and therefore hyperfocused to control himself (as an infant, he would actually just sleep when we were out and about to escape the overwhelm).

 

Then I realized that my insulin disorder had obvious physical symptoms around the time I turned 12/13.  They were blown off (weight gain, fatigue) because I had moved from my mother's home to my dad's and stopped walking to school (the fatigue was blown off to the depression--which was blown off to the life change).

 

Without removing any foods, I started changing the timing and combining of my son's food for a week as if he were fully and severely diabetic.  No sugar/starch/flour/fruit without lots of fat (and protein).  Ensuring he ate EVERY two hours.  Olives, guacamole, hummus, veggie sticks... Suddenly, the severe episodes were gone.

 

We still have trouble with him for sure.  But I'm very much opposed to meds and honestly thought we were going to have to go there.  I don't feel that way anymore.  At all.  It's definitely worth considering.  I think that we definitely need to consider family history--but sometimes it gets in the way of seeing other potential, underlying problems.  :/

 

Just something to consider.  And relatively easy and quick to rule out.  We saw results within the week.  Kind of a PITA to keep up if it's far off from how you normally eat (we don't really eat much in the way of flour, fruit or sugar in the first place and it was still somewhat of a task to adjust to for us) but if it happens to address the issue (or reduce the severity) it's worth it.


Heather - Wife , Mommy  & Health & Wellness Educator, Speaker & Consultant 
 
Dairy, soy & corn free with limited gluten... yes, really. And journeying towards peace.  Blogging about both.
 
Let me guide you to find the food and lifestyle choices...
heatherdeg is offline  
#9 of 13 Old 02-20-2013, 05:27 PM - Thread Starter
 
lilgreen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 3,734
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)

Thank you all so much for your stories and insights. I got good news on Monday - our family counselling programs begins tomorrow. I'm so relieved to have some movement. Now I just hope he (counsellor) is sensitive to our dynamics and history and is not bought by X's show. I hope he does not blame me for ds1 but instead zeroes in on the need to get him help.

 

So, for now I am remaining open to all possibilities. I continue to research and learn from other parents. I am so committed to getting ds1 to a better place so that he can enjoy some inner peace. How that happens is the big question but i'm not going to let him continue like this. He's hurting too much.

 

Thank you all so much!

lilgreen is offline  
#10 of 13 Old 02-20-2013, 07:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
lilgreen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 3,734
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)

I wanted to add ~ Katielady, thank you for your ongoing support. It really means a lot to me. I know you've followed my story for a while and I appreciate it so much. I feel so loved and cared for. Thank you heartbeat.gif

lilgreen is offline  
#11 of 13 Old 02-21-2013, 02:59 PM
 
earthmama4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 608
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Just wanted to leave a little post of support. I have thought about you for days. Your story is so, so similar to mine that its hard for me to find the words to be objective and helpful. I want to just rant and rage on your behalf!!

 

Where you are now is where I was 8 years ago. Our outcome was not good - I do not trust the court system or attorneys to properly protect abused women or children. Even my very supportive attorney encouraged me to settle things that really should have been heard by the judge. So I encourage you to hold your ground. That is very hard to do when you are facing a former abuser. But his choices during your marriage MUST come into account when deciding custody. Many attorneys, judges, and even counselors take a "water under the bridge" approach and want things to start fresh. Don't we all? But that is not reality. Women leave abusive men for a reason, and abuse does not end with divorce when you have children together. If you have read Bancroft's books you know the most abusers do not change. Five years after our divorce, long after all the hearings and the counselors, my XH broke my then 13 yr old son's nose and had verbally berated him to the point he was suicidal. I thought things were "fine". You will need to be an advocate for your children's safety, emotionally and physically for a very long time, until they are old enough to do it themselves. And you will need to keep the doors of communication wide open. I encourage you to always have a trusted ally in the form of a doctor or counsellor, for yourself and for your kids. This is way too much to deal with on your own. I made the mistake of going it alone far too often, and my XH took advantage of that. After the final abuse incident, we held him very accountable. CPS, court-ordered supervised visitation, protective orders, the works. He couldn't deal with that and left our lives. I am still picking up the pieces but we have made huge strides. I hope and pray that you and your children get the help and support now so you may avoid the years of heartache that can happen when you don't. 

 

Ok, I guess that wasn't so little. Brevity is not my strong suit, lol. You are welcome to PM me anytime you need an ear or a hug! 


Mom to DS(17) autismribbon.gif DS(15) autismribbon.gif DS(12) autismribbon.gif My gifted, quirky, wonderful teens!

Mama to Jack bouncy.gif11.08 and Liam  biggrinbounce.gif 9.11 and due with boy #6! stork-boy.gif  

Blissfully married to the love of my life since 8.8.8 partners.gif 

earthmama4 is offline  
#12 of 13 Old 02-23-2013, 10:07 AM - Thread Starter
 
lilgreen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 3,734
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by earthmama4 View Post

Just wanted to leave a little post of support. I have thought about you for days. Your story is so, so similar to mine that its hard for me to find the words to be objective and helpful. I want to just rant and rage on your behalf!!

 

Where you are now is where I was 8 years ago. Our outcome was not good - I do not trust the court system or attorneys to properly protect abused women or children. Even my very supportive attorney encouraged me to settle things that really should have been heard by the judge. So I encourage you to hold your ground. That is very hard to do when you are facing a former abuser. But his choices during your marriage MUST come into account when deciding custody. Many attorneys, judges, and even counselors take a "water under the bridge" approach and want things to start fresh. Don't we all? But that is not reality. Women leave abusive men for a reason, and abuse does not end with divorce when you have children together. If you have read Bancroft's books you know the most abusers do not change. Five years after our divorce, long after all the hearings and the counselors, my XH broke my then 13 yr old son's nose and had verbally berated him to the point he was suicidal. I thought things were "fine". You will need to be an advocate for your children's safety, emotionally and physically for a very long time, until they are old enough to do it themselves. And you will need to keep the doors of communication wide open. I encourage you to always have a trusted ally in the form of a doctor or counsellor, for yourself and for your kids. This is way too much to deal with on your own. I made the mistake of going it alone far too often, and my XH took advantage of that. After the final abuse incident, we held him very accountable. CPS, court-ordered supervised visitation, protective orders, the works. He couldn't deal with that and left our lives. I am still picking up the pieces but we have made huge strides. I hope and pray that you and your children get the help and support now so you may avoid the years of heartache that can happen when you don't. 

 

Ok, I guess that wasn't so little. Brevity is not my strong suit, lol. You are welcome to PM me anytime you need an ear or a hug! 

Thank you. I think the most valuable bits of information for me are the been-there-done-that stories. It's so heartbreaking to read, but thank you because it gives  greater meaning to my concerns. xo

lilgreen is offline  
#13 of 13 Old 02-23-2013, 10:32 AM
 
mamarhu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: dining at the restaurant at the end of the universe
Posts: 3,078
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)

I recommend www.ChildTraumaAcademy.com or almost any book by Bruce Perry. His website is all about understanding how trauma effects neurological development. I have no suggestions about the custody, legal aspects of your situation (I was in an extreme abusive situation, but my kids and I have had no contact at all with the abusing father since they were 3 & 4). What this reading will offer is some understanding about what is going on for your child - not from the point of view of diagnosis and treatment, as much as the perspective of how and why. I found it very validating and supportive, in my nerdy, intellectual way.
 


Rhu - mother,grandmother,daughter,sister,friend-foster,adoptive,and biological;not necessarily in that order. Some of it's magic, some of it's tragic, but I had a good life all the way (Jimmy Buffet)

mamarhu is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off