Do non-autistic kids "stim"? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 11 Old 03-28-2013, 03:27 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My son will hum if he's bored or tired... I've seen videos on youtube of autistic kids "stimming"... his humming seems to resemble that but he doesn't appear to share any of the other characteristics of autism.

I've asked our doctor but she's usually useless anyway so I thought I'd ask some moms with experience with autistic kids of their own who can maybe tell the difference... have you ever seen kids without autism do this or would you probe further even if he doesn't appear to have difficulties in other areas?

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#2 of 11 Old 03-28-2013, 03:34 PM
 
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Neurotypical kids do pretty much all the same things autistic kids do -- line up toys, spin, repeat silly words over and over, etc.  The difference is in the quality and quantity of the behavior. 


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#3 of 11 Old 03-28-2013, 06:00 PM
 
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What earthroot said :)  All kids do things that could be considered stims, it is when they become disruptive or are part of a larger group of issues a child is having that they are seen as a "problem."  But yes, in our typical preschool I have watched neurotypical children spin, line things up, make repetitive sounds.

 

If there is nothing else going on, then I'd say there is nothing else going on.  Of course, if you have doubts or are worried, you could seek an evaluation.  But if all you are seeing is some noise making than I would say that you have nothing to worry about!

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#4 of 11 Old 03-29-2013, 09:29 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for the responses :)

 

I was just kind of worried because he seems to do a lot of it and at specific times, like when the microwave is on to warm a bottle (I'm not sure if maybe he's just excited to be getting a bottle?), when he's playing with his shapes sorter, if he's in his high chair and wants to get out, when he sees me getting him a bowl of cheerios, etc. 

 

I am worried, but I was also worried when I saw him "rooting" for the first time when he was born so I'm not a good gauge of anything.

 

All of the criteria I've found online are really confusing because he is advanced in several milestones but behind in others, like he's really coordinated, has been walking since 8.5 months, is able to do puzzles, sort shapes, turns on an electric keyboard and starts playing, etc. but doesn't talk yet, doesn't initiate play with others, etc. He's just turning 1 now so I can't really tell if he just doesn't do certain things because he doesn't want to or he can't. 

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#5 of 11 Old 03-31-2013, 11:31 PM
 
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I'm thinking stimming is more of a sensory issues thing, and it's just that most people with autism have sensory issues? But a lot of people without autism have sensory issues. I don't have autism, and I do some stimming. (As in, I have to reign in the urge to keep my coworkers from being annoyed and/or thinking I'm a nutjob.) Lately the inclination seems to have gotten worse (stronger, more desperate, and thus more problematic) and I don't know why.

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#6 of 11 Old 04-01-2013, 03:00 AM
 
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I agree with what others have said. Oftentimes, on my biomedical treatments list, we discuss that certain stims and behaviors seem to be related to very specific imbalances. An example is mouthing, which often points to improper mouth flora, and can sometimes be corrected just with culturelle. That is just a super easy example off the top of my head, but you could research others. Oftens parents have seen more verbal stimming when yeast flares, as another example. I did want to give illustrative examples, but I am not a doctor, just a mom using biomed.

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#7 of 11 Old 04-01-2013, 04:21 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Escaping View Post
 but doesn't talk yet, doesn't initiate play with others, etc. He's just turning 1 now so I can't really tell if he just doesn't do certain things because he doesn't want to or he can't. 

I don't remember the talking milestones off the top of my head, but whenever there is a speech delay, the first thing to test is hearing.  A slight delay however is not usually something to worry about.  My younger son didn't point until 14 months, freaked me out, but the doctor didn't think it was a big deal, and he turned out fine.  Also from what I remember, children don't engage in cooperative play until age three. 


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#8 of 11 Old 04-01-2013, 04:27 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Cyllya View Post

I'm thinking stimming is more of a sensory issues thing, and it's just that most people with autism have sensory issues? But a lot of people without autism have sensory issues.

Stimming is not always even a sensory problems thing.  Kids (and sometimes adults) do things just because they like it--swing on a swing, hum a tune, listen to music, tap their fingers on a table, rock back and forth absent-mindedly, etc. 


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#9 of 11 Old 04-01-2013, 07:09 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by EarthRootsStarSoul View Post

I don't remember the talking milestones off the top of my head, but whenever there is a speech delay, the first thing to test is hearing.  A slight delay however is not usually something to worry about.  My younger son didn't point until 14 months, freaked me out, but the doctor didn't think it was a big deal, and he turned out fine.  Also from what I remember, children don't engage in cooperative play until age three. 

 

Yea, the pointing thing worries me too, I can't tell if he points or not... I'm not even sure what pointing actually means... does it mean pointing things out and looking for a reaction from me, or just pointing in general, or just making a hand gesture that looks like he's pointing? He likes to stick his index finger in holes of any kind, so that's kind of like pointing...?

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#10 of 11 Old 04-01-2013, 06:16 PM
 
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OP, as others have said typical kids do many stim things too. It's not diagnostic.
He's young. By a year old (so not now) you would want him responding, more often than not, to his name being called and using nonverbal communication like pointing to show you things. You would see him point and then look to your face to see your response to what he's showing you. He's actually not late to talk at 8.5 months. Are you seeing babbling? Does he smile in response to your smile? Does he imitate you? My spectrum child did those two things but he didn't point or consistently respond to his name at a year. Another big one is does he look at your face for direction/reaction/reassurance when he's unsure of something? If you're starting to see these things I would find that reassuring in terms of autism.

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#11 of 11 Old 04-02-2013, 12:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by EarthRootsStarSoul View Post

Neurotypical kids do pretty much all the same things autistic kids do -- line up toys, spin, repeat silly words over and over, etc.  The difference is in the quality and quantity of the behavior. 

 

I've heard it said that autistic behavior is like "typical behavior on steroids".   It's not the presence of a particular behavior that is worry-some, it's more things like the duration, intensity, if the behavior interferes with the child's ability to function in the environment, etc. 

 

My son had signs of autism from an early age, we just didn't realize it at the time. He didn't make eye contact with us even as an infant and would look at our mouths when we talked instead of our eyes.  He was late to babble and he never did reduplicative babbling (ie "mamamama", "babababa" ) .  He didn't point and couldn't follow where we pointed.  (But we later found out that he's also mildly visually impaired, so it's hard to say which condition was the cause there).   He had a lot of motor skill delays: fine motor, gross motor, and oral motor.  He had a lot of sensory issues: extremely sensitive to certain sounds, hated certain types of movement, and could only be carried in one position. 

 

He didn't talk until he was almost 3, even though he started reading and spelling at age 2 (hyperlexia).  He was officially diagnosed with autism just after his third birthday.


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