Autism and violence - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 5 Old 08-08-2013, 09:00 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I found this to be a very compelling interview with William J Walsh on autism and violence. For those concerned about their autistic children as they age will likely be encouraged. Walsh talks about other mental health conditions, and touches on the value of nutritional therapy. The transcript for those that prefer is here

 

 

Walsh has authored what looks to be a very interesting book, Nutrient Power for those interested in biomedical therapies, for not just ASD but other conditions, such as ADHD, bipolar, schizophrenia, behavior disorders and depression. (I wish I had come across this when my father was first diagnosed with dementia, I might have been able to help him - even if from across the pond).


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#2 of 5 Old 08-21-2013, 03:57 AM
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Very interesting. Thanks for sharing, Mirzam.


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#3 of 5 Old 08-21-2013, 09:09 AM
 
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I agree this is very interesting, and I am glad that this sort of research is being done. But I am pretty tired of the "it's all dietary" answer. Or any other one-size-fits-all answer. For those families it works for, great. For my YoungSon, limited diets and supplements had no impact at all. He is thriving now at 17, has "outgrown" many of the most uncomfortable autistic symptoms. But diet is not a part of it with him.

 

I work with families with kids with major mental health issues, and some have autism (I don't consider autism a mental health diagnosis, but their behavior often sends them into our services). Some of these families have tried dietary interventions and supplementation for years. By the time kids reach our level of care (the highest level of needs that can be supported in the community; next stop is residential care), they have usually had every kind of therapy you have ever heard of, and most are on medications. 

 

As I said, I am glad folks are researching ways to help these kids (and adults). But I think the researchers and authors tend to have a simplistic answer to a complex question, whether they are looking at causes or treatments. I get that this is how science research works - narrow down the variables and focus narrowly and precisely. Real life is not like that. Real people have so many facets - parenting style, school experiences, economic situations, emotional and social strengths and needs, diet and medication experiences - and the list goes on. I don't have a good answer to the issues these families face, and I support families who are trying desperately to find what works for their child - therapeutically, dietary, meds, and whatever else. I am curious to see what direction this "epidemic" takes over the coming years.


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#4 of 5 Old 08-23-2013, 11:29 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by mamarhu View Post

I agree this is very interesting, and I am glad that this sort of research is being done. But I am pretty tired of the "it's all dietary" answer. Or any other one-size-fits-all answer. For those families it works for, great. For my YoungSon, limited diets and supplements had no impact at all. He is thriving now at 17, has "outgrown" many of the most uncomfortable autistic symptoms. But diet is not a part of it with him.

 

I work with families with kids with major mental health issues, and some have autism (I don't consider autism a mental health diagnosis, but their behavior often sends them into our services). Some of these families have tried dietary interventions and supplementation for years. By the time kids reach our level of care (the highest level of needs that can be supported in the community; next stop is residential care), they have usually had every kind of therapy you have ever heard of, and most are on medications. 

 

As I said, I am glad folks are researching ways to help these kids (and adults). But I think the researchers and authors tend to have a simplistic answer to a complex question, whether they are looking at causes or treatments. I get that this is how science research works - narrow down the variables and focus narrowly and precisely. Real life is not like that. Real people have so many facets - parenting style, school experiences, economic situations, emotional and social strengths and needs, diet and medication experiences - and the list goes on. I don't have a good answer to the issues these families face, and I support families who are trying desperately to find what works for their child - therapeutically, dietary, meds, and whatever else. I am curious to see what direction this "epidemic" takes over the coming years.

 

Dr Walsh stated very clearly that there is not a one-size fits all solution. Every human being is different with different deficiences so they have to be treated as just that. 


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#5 of 5 Old 08-23-2013, 11:55 AM
 
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Marmahu, I always read your posts with interest.  It puzzles me just as much as you why some children respond to the gf/cf diet and heavy metal detox protocols and others don't.  I get the sense you have read a great deal in your parenting journey and done a lot of your own soul searching.

 

When my son was first diagnosed almost three years ago I happened upon Dr. Amy Yasko's work on metabolic pathways.  If you google her a great deal of info comes up.  Since she is a biochemist a great deal of what she writes has too much scientific jargon for me, but, I splurged and bought her book.  I slogged through it, and it confirmed in my mind that there are different "pathways" of body detox that are blocked or partially blocked in different people with the same diagnosis.  While she suggests testing a person's blood for deficiencies and genetic markers to determine what pathways to work on to help relieve symptoms, you can, as I did, use trial an error.  I tried B-12, it worked.  I tried the diet...it worked....but, if it didn't, I would have kept trying.

 

I know you've seen for young son that it all worked out in the end, where he had maturity, good parenting and many of his symptoms resolved.  But, I'd also hate for people to think that that is automatically going to happen without helping and supporting that biomedically.  I've seen it go the other way, where kids take a nose dive, around 11/12 (I'm a little worried about that myself....my son is doing so well, i'd hate to see that change :(  )

 

I think it's interesting stuff, the newer work that's coming out by Yasko and like Dr. Walsh above.  If a child is very symptomatic, I know you can relate to this...a parent usually sees  something very unhealthy is happening in the body.  The bowels aren't working right, there are chronic immune problems etc.  Autism is just a part of the picture, often. 

 

It's possible Young son, may have been doing intrinsically what he needed at the time, by eating a limited broth diet....I wonder about that when you've mentioned it before.  It may have helped his body detox, which, in my son's experience with it, can take quite a while to even see real lasting change in behavior and mood which may be why you didn't link it to his eventual improvements....Just a wondering on my part.... 

 

I just thought I'd chime in in this regard.  I hope you don't mind.  I respect your contributions and hope that my son turns out as well as yours :) 
 

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