Unsure about whether therapist is meeting our needs re: discipline - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 30 Old 03-19-2014, 01:26 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I hope this forum is the right place to post this concern.

 

DH and I have basically felt overwhelmed ever since our son was born 4 years ago. It has been suggested to me that he was a high needs baby (maybe true) and that I had PPD (I did and still do suffer from depression and so does DH) and we have gone through many attempts to solve ongoing sleep issues over this time. Finally, DH said, "This can't be normal. We have to do *something* about DS" so we took him to a child/family therapist.

 

I guess I was hoping to find ways to connect and better communicate as a family, based on all the reading I do on gentle discipline. That is not what the therapist is offering. The first thing she went over was "how to make time outs more effective." I have always avoided time outs in favour of time ins--an opportunity to calm down, connect, and discuss the issue. She told me that I was rewarding him for bad behaviour by giving him attention. Next, she went over reward charts. Finally, she told my son in no uncertain terms that he needs to stop sleeping with me. I felt so bad for him when she said that and he let out a heartbreaking cry. We agreed that we would work on having him fall asleep on his own in his own bed, but I don't have a problem with him getting into bed with me in the night. The reward chart has mostly been used for him staying in bed after being tucked in until he falls asleep the first time. 

 

We were also given a battery of questionnaires which we filled out, as well as his day care teachers. We got the results back today: He is high in hyperactivity, inattentiveness, aggression, and sleep issues and low in social skills, apparently. The therapist is reluctant to diagnose him with ADHD at his age, but obviously he is showing signs. She said that to know whether these are behaviours or whether he is unable to stop himself (chemical imbalance), we really need to step up the time outs. Basically, she said that whenever he does what is requested of him the first time we ask, he should get a check mark on the chart, and whenever he does not obey the first time we ask, he should have a time out. First of all, I think that expecting complete obedience is insane. Second, I am wondering whether she is right that time outs and reward charts are the best way to discipline children with ADHD, even though it goes against my parenting instincts. Obviously what we have been doing hasn't been working, so maybe it's time to try something new, right?

 

I'm supposed to see her again in a month to discuss whether or not it is working.


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#2 of 30 Old 03-20-2014, 07:19 AM
 
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I have no idea regarding the diagnosis, but it sounds clear that this therapist's style does not mesh with your family. Find another! Read "The Explosive Child". Unfortunately titled, this book goes far deeper than handling explosions. Your kid is probably too young for the specific parenting suggestions in the second half (the conversations they suggest sound scripted and stiff to me anyway), but the general philosophy may resonate with you. The authors' general point is that kids do well if they can. If they can't, lagging skills are what is getting in the way. All behavior is communication, and your child is trying to get some unmet need filled. This outlook can completely change your response from punishment to teaching. Please read the book - they say this far better than I can. The approach is called Collaborative Problem Solving, and perhaps you could find a class in your area, or a therapist who supports this kind of attitude.

 

If sleeping together as a family works for you guys, who the bleep is the therapist to change that? If charts and time-outs don't fit with your style, you don't have to do it. There is no right and wrong in parenting (or therapeutic) styles, within reason, but it seems that this therapist is not the right one for your family. You can go shopping for support that is more closely aligned with your own style.

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#3 of 30 Old 03-20-2014, 08:27 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you for responding. Obviously I am realizing that the therapist is not a good fit, although I was wondering if I am the one who needs to change my expectations. I am unsure, however, how to find a more suitable therapist. I have been asking around and haven't found any leads.

 

I will read the book. I never really thought of my son as explosive or particularly aggressive, but his aggression level is apparently really high for a boy his age. He's pretty adaptable when it comes to change, but if he doesn't get his own way or if he wants to do something and you do it for him, WATCH OUT! 

 

From the description, it looks like this book will be helpful. Thank you.


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#4 of 30 Old 03-20-2014, 06:10 PM
 
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I second reading The Explosive Child.  It's an amazing book!  

 

One other thing to think about is that when you have a child who has special needs, sometimes you have to adjust your parenting plans.  I know that I was planning to be very free and easy as a parent, letting the wind take us where we would go.  Well, one child on the autism spectrum who needed to really be regimented to feel secure in the world changed all that.  It went totally against the way I wanted to parent, but it worked best for him and made him a happier kid.  I'm not say that this is the case with your son.  I just bring it up because I think a lot of moms here in this forum have found that sometimes the ideals we set up for parenting might need to be adjusted to make a better fit for our children.  

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#5 of 30 Old 03-22-2014, 09:36 AM
 
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One other thing to think about is that when you have a child who has special needs, sometimes you have to adjust your parenting plans.  I know that I was planning to be very free and easy as a parent, letting the wind take us where we would go.  Well, one child on the autism spectrum who needed to really be regimented to feel secure in the world changed all that. 

 

I had a similar experience. I had read so many books and had parenting all figured out,but then my DD was just completely different than all the books said she would be, and we had to figure out different ways to parent. I grieved the lost of the experience that I had thought would be wholesome and natural, the "right" raise to a child. I just had to parent the kid I had in front of me.

 

I don't know what the answers are for your son, and I can see the difficulties in figuring it out.

 

 


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#6 of 30 Old 03-22-2014, 12:36 PM
 
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Yes!, 'Explosive Child', and look up Laura Markham, who is also a psychologist.  I wonder if you could consult with her instead? ( i would love to myself)

 

I imagine it would be very frustrating for you. How possible is it to find a psychologist who backs up your family philosophy and can offer more constructive advice?

 

Another thing-look into gluten elimination, as i found  gluten caused  symptoms of hyperactivity in my ds2. That may not be the case with your child. Other food sensitivities can also  be at play- for us it is corn and oats.  Fortunately we never had sleep issues though.

 

I just hope you can find a good therapist. Its hard dealing with many professionals i find, as they have a different outlook, and are not open to discussion about it (after all, they know better right?) some of them are not particularly respectful of parents either.

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#7 of 30 Old 03-24-2014, 07:09 PM
 
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Definitely agree on the parenting styles comment.  The parenting style that I had envisioned us using is absolutely useless with our son (age 3).  

 

When you have a special needs child, you have to adjust your approach, and be willing to try new things, even if they push you out of your comfort zone.  While the therapist's recommendations don't seem to work with your feelings, you might consider if it is worth a go...  not much to lose, since you say that what you are doing now is not working.  Though I see no reason for removing him from the family bed??!!

 

Also, you don't say if he is receiving special services from your school district.  You might consider contacting your town's schools and asking for him to be evaluated for special needs services.  They are required to do so if you ask.  Our experience with our son's special ed teacher and team has been AMAZING.

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#8 of 30 Old 03-24-2014, 07:17 PM
 
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I'd like to encourage you to find a therapist that fits with your family, no need to add to the confusion and frustration. No one knows your little one better than you. Apart from therapy also encourage you to look into the diet. You'd be surprised how artificial dyes alter children's behavior. I truly believe that children want to do well. I commend for trying to find what works. From my experience is a little bit of this and a little bit of that. Good pick. Keep up The good work!
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#9 of 30 Old 03-25-2014, 07:35 AM
 
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Definitely agree on the parenting styles comment.  The parenting style that I had envisioned us using is absolutely useless with our son (age 3).  

 

When you have a special needs child, you have to adjust your approach, and be willing to try new things, even if they push you out of your comfort zone.  While the therapist's  recommendations don't seem to work with your feelings, 

 

I find this a little demeaning, as if  her 'feelings', were getting in the way of good parenting, and the recommendations get in the way of her 'feelings' but are otherwise fine. There's a whole lot more to intentional parenting. attachment parenting, gentle discipline, and many of those values and practices inspiring posters on this website, than mere 'feelings'. Come on, give this mom more credit. (maybe you are one of those therapists yourself? Thats the sort of thing i expect to hear from  therapists that arent respectful of parents)

Also, i take issue with the phrase 'parenting style', like its a shirt you try on one day, and a different one the next. I call it more a philosophy. Thats not something you change from day to day, nor is it something that one gives up so easily. The object is to do the best you can for the child, not just swallow uncritically to the advice of any 2nd rate psychologist.

 

 

you might consider if it is worth a go...  not much to lose, since you say that what you are doing now is not working.

 

I think theres plenty to lose when you try something that the parents have rejected for good reason.I would try the many other options first before trying things that dont usually work, and can be harmful to children. As a last resort, then of course. But cant the psychologist offer something better than a last resort? Perhaps in your case it did work, but that does not mean it is the same for everyone.

 

 

Though I see no reason for removing him from the family bed??!!  Well said.

 
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#10 of 30 Old 03-25-2014, 02:47 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I wasn't offended by mariee's comment because she was just reiterating what I was wondering: Do I need to use timeouts to meet my child's unique needs? 

 

But I did get a lead on a family practice that specializes in attachment and I have made contact with one of the therapists there who works with younger children (apparently most of the therapists in the practice specialize in school aged children and adolescents). We just need to set up a time to meet. I am hopeful that she will be a better fit for my family. 

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#11 of 30 Old 03-25-2014, 04:47 PM
 
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I wasn't offended by mariee's comment because she was just reiterating what I was wondering: Do I need to use timeouts to meet my child's unique needs? 

 

But I did get a lead on a family practice that specializes in attachment and I have made contact with one of the therapists there who works with younger children (apparently most of the therapists in the practice specialize in school aged children and adolescents). We just need to set up a time to meet. I am hopeful that she will be a better fit for my family. 

That is wonderful you were able to find a therapist like that!  You definitely need to find a therapist that is willing to take into account your parenting goals and one that you trust well enough to be willing to try things you haven't thought of yet.  I'm glad you didn't take offense that I mentioned about sometimes having to change our parenting expectations.  I just know how heartbreaking it can sometimes be to have to do that.  So many parents, myself included have had to go through that, and I wanted you to know that it's OK and you aren't alone in that struggle to balance your ideals and reality.   


 
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#12 of 30 Old 03-25-2014, 05:13 PM
 
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I just wanted to put in my two cents, in case it's of any help. My DD has ADHD and ASD. She was a pretty good sleeper as a baby, but not since then. She's ten now and takes melatonin after dinner to help her sleep at night. I don't know if you could give it to a four year old safely, but it's been really helpful. Increasing her exposure to sunlight has helped boost her own melatonin production as well. Other things that have helped us include dietary changes (no gluten or sugar/corn syrup), predictable routines and consistent discipline.
Regular time outs and reward charts were NOT at all effective with my DD, and we did try them. (wits end, you know?) what DID make a difference was being really consistent. The same behavior has to get the same consequence every time, regardless of which parent is in charge or other extenuating circumstances. This goes for positive reinforcement as well as negative. I think that's really more the goal of what the therapist is telling you to do, be consistent and predictable. The predictability is important for your child, they need to know ahead of time what the reaction/consequence will be in order for them to choose an appropriate action. It can't depend on how your day is going, or whether you have company, or if you just went through this with them three hours ago. This isn't just helpful from a behavior modification stand point, but it actually made my daughter feel more secure. Now she KNOWS what is expected of her and what she can expect of us. So much less stressful all around.
The other big thing for us was adjusting our expectations. We expect our daughter to do her best, but we can't expect her to use skills she doesn't have. There are things she isn't able to do that other kids her age probably can, and we need to take that into account. We can't make rules according to what we want her to do, without reference to her individual abilities and challenges, and expect her to follow them. This may sound like "duh", but it's taken a while to sink in and we're still working on it in some areas.
As far as the family bed goes, if it's working for you then go for it. I coslept with my DD, in one form or another, until she was 6 and it was great. She still crawls in bed and cuddles with me in the morning most days. However, if you guys aren't sleeping well maybe it's time to consider other sleeping arrangements? Above all, do what feels right for your family and gets all of you the most sleep.
Lastly, regarding this therapist - fire her. Seriously, she is there to advise and assist, not to make judgements about your parenting choices. If she makes a recommendation she had better be able to back it up with scientific evidence that it is likely to be beneficial in your circumstances. Sweeping generalizations and one-size-fits-all advice are signs of someone who isn't committed to helping your individual family and likely isn't very good at their job.
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#13 of 30 Old 03-25-2014, 08:09 PM
 
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I'm sorry if my words were not more carefully chosen.  I'm freaking exhausted most days and often don't come across the way I mean to.  Glad you were not offended nsmomtobe.  

 

The first therapist DOES seem extreme, don't get me wrong.  I think a timeout for every refusal to comply is insane.  You know why?  Because my DS must refuse to comply at least 20-30 times a day.  I've tried time out.  Over and over.  He doesnt get it and it doesn't work for us.  But that doesn't mean it isn't worth a try.  Maybe not for every refusal, but what about a "3 strikes and its timeout" policy?  

 

Special needs kids often need an approach that is different from what we envisioned for our kids/ family.  That's all I meant to convey.  Just be open to new ideas, even if it is something you never thought you'd consider.  

 

And for god's sake's, contactmaya, ease off. Thank god I threw in that family bed comment or you'd want to permanently revoke my crunchy card.

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#14 of 30 Old 03-26-2014, 04:45 AM
 
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contactmaya-

One of the things I love so much about the special needs parenting is the open and respectful discussion that takes place here.  I might be biased, having moderated this forum for many years, but I think it is truly one of the most supportive forums on the board.  One of the things that is helpful in creating that feeling is to give each other the benefit of the doubt when we see a post that we are unsure of.  Asking for clarification before accusations really lends itself to keeping the conversation civil.  We are all in this together.  Parenting a special needs child can be exhausting and frustrating, so often times posts are written in haste and exhaustion.  It's a good thing to keep that in mind when we respond to each other.  

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#15 of 30 Old 03-26-2014, 12:04 PM
 
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I havent caught up with the  posts but apologies if my post was offensive in anyway. I suppose i am sensitive to professionals being dismissive of parents, and in particular, if parents have a non mainstream approach to things.

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#16 of 30 Old 03-26-2014, 12:05 PM
 
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And for god's sake's, contactmaya, ease off. Thank god I threw in that family bed comment or you'd want to permanently revoke my crunchy card.

Oh no, your or my crunchy credentials is the last thing on my mind.

 

OP, great news that you have found a psychologists whose advice you can put more faith in.

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#17 of 30 Old 03-28-2014, 06:36 AM - Thread Starter
 
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The first therapist DOES seem extreme, don't get me wrong.  I think a timeout for every refusal to comply is insane.  You know why?  Because my DS must refuse to comply at least 20-30 times a day.  I've tried time out.  Over and over.  He doesnt get it and it doesn't work for us.  But that doesn't mean it isn't worth a try.  Maybe not for every refusal, but what about a "3 strikes and its timeout" policy?  

 

This is actually what we were doing, but the therapist said that we were giving him too many chances and not being consistent or immediate enough with consequences. I argue that it is important for him to know what behaviour will result in time outs. But I guess he should just assume that he will get a time out if he doesn't blindly obey every suggestion we make.

 

I've made an appointment for next week with the new therapist. Just me and DH for now. We talked a little on the phone and she said she is not a fan of time outs because she thinks it disrupts the connection between parent and child. I think I'm going to like her.


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#18 of 30 Old 03-28-2014, 09:03 AM
 
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That sounds really good!  Hope the new one works well for you!  

 

We are still trying to figure out what works best here.... its totally a work in progress.  Social stories have been really helpful for DS.  Have you tried those?  We have one on hitting, throwing, and one for following directions.  His teacher made them for us but I've found a lot online, too.  And we've been using a ton of visuals, as well, and that makes transitions a little better sometimes....  

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#19 of 30 Old 04-25-2014, 04:39 AM
 
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This is actually what we were doing, but the therapist said that we were giving him too many chances and not being consistent or immediate enough with consequences. I argue that it is important for him to know what behaviour will result in time outs. But I guess he should just assume that he will get a time out if he doesn't blindly obey every suggestion we make.

 

I've made an appointment for next week with the new therapist. Just me and DH for now. We talked a little on the phone and she said she is not a fan of time outs because she thinks it disrupts the connection between parent and child. I think I'm going to like her.

How did it go with the new therapist?


 
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#20 of 30 Old 04-25-2014, 05:46 AM - Thread Starter
 
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How did it go with the new therapist?

So far, she seems to be on the same page. She recommended two books: Creating Loving Attachments and Raising Your Spirited Child.

 

She met with him and said that she thinks he is afraid of his emotions because he thinks he will get in trouble if he gets angry. So she told him about the "turtle technique," in which you withdraw into your shell and count to 10 until you calm down and can think of a solution. I'm not sure how well that works in practice. He literally curls up into a ball on the floor in order to go into his shell, and he apparently got a time-out at day care for doing that yesterday. I'm sure there is more to the story than that, but DH talked to his teacher today and she will talk to the others and hopefully they can find a safe place for him to do that without being disruptive.

 

DH and I are going to meet with her in a few weeks to let her know how things are going after we've had time to read the book, etc., and then we can work on some parenting issues. The one thing she has said a few times that has made me worry is, "You are the parents, so what you say goes." In particular, she said this in relationship to bedtime: He will not stay in bed if he gets put to bed before 9:30. He is just not tired enough to sleep before 10. We have been dealing with this for 4 years and we have found that 9:30 is the best time to put him to bed because then he is asleep by 10. Any earlier just leads to frustration. Any later is hit and miss, but he is often too wound up to sleep. However, she said, "He needs to learn to go to bed earlier because you are the parents and you say so." Huh? So I am hesitantly curious to find out what she means by that.


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#21 of 30 Old 04-25-2014, 07:39 AM
 
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Is it possible she thinks he is not getting enough sleep?

 
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#22 of 30 Old 04-25-2014, 07:42 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Is it possible she thinks he is not getting enough sleep?

Yes. She did say he would probably do better with more sleep. 

 

But he has been waking up earlier than ever lately, so I don't know if putting him to bed earlier will help with that. We used to have to drag him out of bed at 7, but now he is waking us up at 6.


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#23 of 30 Old 04-25-2014, 07:51 AM
 
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I hope this forum is the right place to post this concern.

 

DH and I have basically felt overwhelmed ever since our son was born 4 years ago. It has been suggested to me that he was a high needs baby (maybe true) and that I had PPD (I did and still do suffer from depression and so does DH) and we have gone through many attempts to solve ongoing sleep issues over this time. Finally, DH said, "This can't be normal. We have to do *something* about DS" so we took him to a child/family therapist.

 

I guess I was hoping to find ways to connect and better communicate as a family, based on all the reading I do on gentle discipline. That is not what the therapist is offering. The first thing she went over was "how to make time outs more effective." I have always avoided time outs in favour of time ins--an opportunity to calm down, connect, and discuss the issue. She told me that I was rewarding him for bad behaviour by giving him attention. Next, she went over reward charts. Finally, she told my son in no uncertain terms that he needs to stop sleeping with me. I felt so bad for him when she said that and he let out a heartbreaking cry. We agreed that we would work on having him fall asleep on his own in his own bed, but I don't have a problem with him getting into bed with me in the night. The reward chart has mostly been used for him staying in bed after being tucked in until he falls asleep the first time. 

 

We were also given a battery of questionnaires which we filled out, as well as his day care teachers. We got the results back today: He is high in hyperactivity, inattentiveness, aggression, and sleep issues and low in social skills, apparently. The therapist is reluctant to diagnose him with ADHD at his age, but obviously he is showing signs. She said that to know whether these are behaviours or whether he is unable to stop himself (chemical imbalance), we really need to step up the time outs. Basically, she said that whenever he does what is requested of him the first time we ask, he should get a check mark on the chart, and whenever he does not obey the first time we ask, he should have a time out. First of all, I think that expecting complete obedience is insane. Second, I am wondering whether she is right that time outs and reward charts are the best way to discipline children with ADHD, even though it goes against my parenting instincts. Obviously what we have been doing hasn't been working, so maybe it's time to try something new, right?

 

I'm supposed to see her again in a month to discuss whether or not it is working.

 

You are describing my 3 year old son to a tee.  I don't have time to read all the response posts right now- I'm about to be babysitting 4 kids in a few minutes- but for the sleeping in bed with you thing, what's the big deal?  If it works for you, then don't try to change it, and if, for some reason you need him to sleep in his own space, perhaps you can start by putting him in a toddler bed right up against your bed, to get him used to his own space, while still feeling close enough to you so that he feels safe?  I've started that with my son  about 3 weeks ago, and he went from the child who woke every 2 hours in his own bed, or slept well in my bed but then I slept horrible 'cause I had no space, to the child who wakes maybe once in the night.

 

As for discipline for ADHD, it doesn't matter HOW you do it, the main importance is the consistency of the discipline.


I pray for the day Family Court recognizes that CHILDREN have rights, parents only have PRIVILEGES.  Only then, will I know my child is safe.
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#24 of 30 Old 04-25-2014, 08:10 AM - Thread Starter
 
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You are describing my 3 year old son to a tee.  I don't have time to read all the response posts right now- I'm about to be babysitting 4 kids in a few minutes- but for the sleeping in bed with you thing, what's the big deal?  If it works for you, then don't try to change it, and if, for some reason you need him to sleep in his own space, perhaps you can start by putting him in a toddler bed right up against your bed, to get him used to his own space, while still feeling close enough to you so that he feels safe?  

This is actually what his own bed is. He starts out in there but always ends up in bed with me. I don't mind most of the time (and even miss him when he is not in my bed), but then he starts to take over my bed and I occasionally have to kick him back into his own bed. He has never spent the whole night in his toddler bed. Maybe we will discuss it again though (now that he is getting better at going sleep on his own). I am actually pregnant now, so that makes me want the bed to myself more than ever.


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#25 of 30 Old 04-25-2014, 11:37 AM
 
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This is actually what his own bed is. He starts out in there but always ends up in bed with me. I don't mind most of the time (and even miss him when he is not in my bed), but then he starts to take over my bed and I occasionally have to kick him back into his own bed. He has never spent the whole night in his toddler bed. Maybe we will discuss it again though (now that he is getting better at going sleep on his own). I am actually pregnant now, so that makes me want the bed to myself more than ever.

 

Perhaps try to somehow raise the toddler bed up higher so it's more at level with your bed?  That's the only other thing I can think of- once my son could easily see me, which he couldn't when he was a foot or more lower than me, then he was more okay with sleeping in his own bed.  Plus, we did the hand holding thing from each of our beds, while he got used to it, and I told him once it's light outside, then he can come in bed with me, which also helped, made him feel like he was less "kicked out" of my bed.  I hope you find something that works for you- I know how hard parental sleep deprivation is!


I pray for the day Family Court recognizes that CHILDREN have rights, parents only have PRIVILEGES.  Only then, will I know my child is safe.
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#26 of 30 Old 04-27-2014, 11:43 AM
 
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At least with babies, i know some sleep longer when they go to bed earlier. She may be hoping an earlier bedtime will help.

 


Do you have good blinds in your room? Is there any chance that he's waking up earlier now that the sun is rising earlier? Very heavy curtains that block out all light may help, if that is the case.


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At least with babies, i know some sleep longer when they go to bed earlier. She may be hoping an earlier bedtime will help.

 


Do you have good blinds in your room? Is there any chance that he's waking up earlier now that the sun is rising earlier? Very heavy curtains that block out all light may help, if that is the case.

I second this!  We have also found with our son on the autism spectrum and with our son with ADHD, that melatonin makes a huge difference in when they fall asleep and how long they sleep.  They're old enough now, that they actually ask for it on nights that they can't fall asleep.  At this point, maybe once every 2-3 weeks.  They tend to get at least 8-10 hours a sleep at night, coming from 4-6 when they were younger, before we started melatonin.  Some kids do great with homeopathic remedies as well.  

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#28 of 30 Old 05-13-2014, 05:02 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I second this!  We have also found with our son on the autism spectrum and with our son with ADHD, that melatonin makes a huge difference in when they fall asleep and how long they sleep.  They're old enough now, that they actually ask for it on nights that they can't fall asleep.  At this point, maybe once every 2-3 weeks.  They tend to get at least 8-10 hours a sleep at night, coming from 4-6 when they were younger, before we started melatonin.  Some kids do great with homeopathic remedies as well.  

It's funny that this thread came up just now when I did a search for melatonin. We just had another meeting with the therapist yesterday and she could not recommend it enough. I expressed concern over possible dependency and developmental side effects in children, and she couldn't fathom any issues with using it. So I am looking into it now. My parents (who were babysitting) were horrified at the idea of drugging him, but when I asked DS if he would like to take medicine to help him sleep, he said yes, very much.

 

He has dark curtains that work pretty well and I did manage to raise his bed closer to mine, but he still does not stay in it.


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#29 of 30 Old 05-20-2014, 01:40 PM
 
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Another shout out for Melatonin. Our 4 yr old just got diagnosed with ASD and sleep has been the battle of our lives from the day he has been born. During the diagnostic appt, the behavorial pediatrician suggested Melatonin and our lives changed from that day. I am not exaggerating! His mood, temperament, ability to regulate emotions, our moods, our family's dynamics has all changed...I can't stress how much this has helped. 


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Another shout out for Melatonin. Our 4 yr old just got diagnosed with ASD and sleep has been the battle of our lives from the day he has been born. During the diagnostic appt, the behavorial pediatrician suggested Melatonin and our lives changed from that day. I am not exaggerating! His mood, temperament, ability to regulate emotions, our moods, our family's dynamics has all changed...I can't stress how much this has helped. 

Amy, how much do you use? 


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 12/08 (6 weeks),  1/13 (11 weeks), &  12/13 (9.5 weeks)
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