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#1 of 15 Old 07-11-2014, 07:20 AM - Thread Starter
 
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How to do GFCF diet /biomedical approach when there's sensory issues with food?!s

Hi there

So I am looking into biomedical treatments for my ds, who is 3. He has spd along with several autistic like symptoms and behaviours, and we've been working with OT and SLP and he's seen dev. pediatrician (sadly, not super helpful and waiting list is over a year). He's made some progress slowly but now I am looking at a local naturopath who is a DAN! doctor who works with asd/spd.
One of the struggles with ds that has not changed despite much help and many seemingly great strategies from OT and dietician is that my sons diet is very severely self limited. He's down to eating only 5 foods. Even having foods near him that are not on his list causes distress. He is on pediasure (i know, i know, not ideal but he started refusing the awesome smoothies that were the saving grace in his diet so thats where we are right now)This is absolutely a sensory issue that developed the same time other areas regressed. There is no way to 'make' him eat and to do so would cause intense distress and destroy his trust in us and any trust he is very slowly building in food.
So how on earth could we go gfcf and administer multiple supplements? Is that just an unrealistic goal? But if it could be part of healing his gut and contribute to his well being should we do it? I honestly think he would starve before eating somehting he doesn't consider food. ie. he eats only one kind of bagel and so a gluten free one would look different not to mention taste different and he couldnt handle that at this point. he simply wouldnt eat it. everything he eats is dairy or carbs (which to me indicates a problem in itself!)
I realise some of these are questions no one else can answer and I will have to give it more thought and make the best decision I can for my little guy but I'm wondering if anyone else has gone through this and how did it go?
Thanks!
Lottie x
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#2 of 15 Old 07-11-2014, 04:45 PM
 
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Hi there

So I am looking into biomedical treatments for my ds, who is 3. He has spd along with several autistic like symptoms and behaviours, and we've been working with OT and SLP and he's seen dev. pediatrician (sadly, not super helpful and waiting list is over a year). He's made some progress slowly but now I am looking at a local naturopath who is a DAN! doctor who works with asd/spd.
One of the struggles with ds that has not changed despite much help and many seemingly great strategies from OT and dietician is that my sons diet is very severely self limited. He's down to eating only 5 foods. Even having foods near him that are not on his list causes distress. He is on pediasure (i know, i know, not ideal but he started refusing the awesome smoothies that were the saving grace in his diet so thats where we are right now)This is absolutely a sensory issue that developed the same time other areas regressed. There is no way to 'make' him eat and to do so would cause intense distress and destroy his trust in us and any trust he is very slowly building in food.
So how on earth could we go gfcf and administer multiple supplements? Is that just an unrealistic goal? But if it could be part of healing his gut and contribute to his well being should we do it? I honestly think he would starve before eating somehting he doesn't consider food. ie. he eats only one kind of bagel and so a gluten free one would look different not to mention taste different and he couldnt handle that at this point. he simply wouldnt eat it. everything he eats is dairy or carbs (which to me indicates a problem in itself!)
I realise some of these are questions no one else can answer and I will have to give it more thought and make the best decision I can for my little guy but I'm wondering if anyone else has gone through this and how did it go?
Thanks!
Lottie x
YES, I went through this and came out the other side. I've since learned that I used many techniques that professionals use when dealing with a child with food refusal. You may decide to work with an OT in your home specifically to help your son deal with a change in diet, but, we were able to do this ourselves, with me following my instincts.

It helped that I worked with young children as a clinician before having my own, but, you if you're up for this, go ahead. I can certainly relate to your fear that he will "starve" if you take away his usual foods or you'll loose his trust if you "force" him to eat. I also felt a lot of sadness that eating a "different" diet from other children immediately marked him as different and he'd feel excluded from the fun of pizza at parties or ice cream at school events.

You need a reframe on this. If he wanted to eat "sand" at the beach, you'd stop him and tell him why. If he wants to eat foods that make him "confused", "hyper", "unable to learn", you stop him because you love him and want him to be his best and feel healthy. In kid language, you can say to him, you think his old foods are making his head feel "funny", and he needs to eat different things for his head to feel better.

You must set very clear expectations, placing the food in front of him, and not allowing him an "out". But, set the bar very low. Take 1 bite, before, receiving a very motivating reward. Maybe, it is a tv show he likes, or, a sticker. What ever works. At the same time, explain why eating this food is important.

At the same time, you also have to go "cold turkey" and drop all the foods you think he's intolerant of. At three you can often see BIG changes very quickly. He won't starve. He'll "dry out", as often, kids who are intolerant, CRAVE the foods they're intolerant of, like an addict. When he dries out, you'll ask him to eat one bite, and before you know it he'll eat six because he's hungry and he will actually want to eat more. At least, that was my experience and that of other parents I know. You have to give it time. It may take two weeks, maybe less, but, he'll learn. Three is a good age to do this, as he's young enough that he won't remember his old diet when he is elementary age.

My son is now 12 and eats EVERYTHING, but, is still on a gf/cf diet. He used to be VERY sensory sensitive but no longer has a hard time chewing and swallowing a variety of foods. And, dietary changes were the linchpin for us, in seeing great improvement in his developmental progress. He is no longer on the spectrum.

Let me know if I can answer any more questions.....
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#3 of 15 Old 07-11-2014, 07:12 PM - Thread Starter
 
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YES, I went through this and came out the other side. I've since learned that I used many techniques that professionals use when dealing with a child with food refusal. You may decide to work with an OT in your home specifically to help your son deal with a change in diet, but, we were able to do this ourselves, with me following my instincts.

It helped that I worked with young children as a clinician before having my own, but, you if you're up for this, go ahead. I can certainly relate to your fear that he will "starve" if you take away his usual foods or you'll loose his trust if you "force" him to eat. I also felt a lot of sadness that eating a "different" diet from other children immediately marked him as different and he'd feel excluded from the fun of pizza at parties or ice cream at school events.

You need a reframe on this. If he wanted to eat "sand" at the beach, you'd stop him and tell him why. If he wants to eat foods that make him "confused", "hyper", "unable to learn", you stop him because you love him and want him to be his best and feel healthy. In kid language, you can say to him, you think his old foods are making his head feel "funny", and he needs to eat different things for his head to feel better.

You must set very clear expectations, placing the food in front of him, and not allowing him an "out". But, set the bar very low. Take 1 bite, before, receiving a very motivating reward. Maybe, it is a tv show he likes, or, a sticker. What ever works. At the same time, explain why eating this food is important.

At the same time, you also have to go "cold turkey" and drop all the foods you think he's intolerant of. At three you can often see BIG changes very quickly. He won't starve. He'll "dry out", as often, kids who are intolerant, CRAVE the foods they're intolerant of, like an addict. When he dries out, you'll ask him to eat one bite, and before you know it he'll eat six because he's hungry and he will actually want to eat more. At least, that was my experience and that of other parents I know. You have to give it time. It may take two weeks, maybe less, but, he'll learn. Three is a good age to do this, as he's young enough that he won't remember his old diet when he is elementary age.

My son is now 12 and eats EVERYTHING, but, is still on a gf/cf diet. He used to be VERY sensory sensitive but no longer has a hard time chewing and swallowing a variety of foods. And, dietary changes were the linchpin for us, in seeing great improvement in his developmental progress. He is no longer on the spectrum.

Let me know if I can answer any more questions.....
THANK YOU livinglife for sharing your experience this is very encouraging, I really appreciate you taking the time to reply. I'm giving this a lot of thought about how best to go about it.

We have had a great OT (as well as SLP and resource teacher) working with us for 2 years and we've seen some improvement in all areas but his food issues. It's puzzling how it has become so extreme, we have been doing 'all the right things' as far as strategies go that usually help the sensory food refuser, but the level of genuine distress food causes him is so sad to see, and why I am so concerned about taking this step with restricting his diet. I have no problem denying him foods if they are indeed harming him, but I do feel its possible it will trigger more regression by creating a very hungry kid who then wont sleep, which makes sensory issues worse which makes social and language regress, increasing frustration and meltdowns, which makes him less able to eat the good stuff I want him to! KWIM?

Which is why it is so helpful to hear that getting off the dairy and gluten made such a positive difference for your son.

Have a great weekend
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#4 of 15 Old 07-12-2014, 05:00 AM
 
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take the leap!

It is a leap of faith, I grant you. I absolutely needed to hear that this worked from other parents, 10 years ago, when I put my son on a gf/cf diet for the first time. Then, every step of the way, I needed to strengthen my resolve, as once he was on the diet, I needed to understand that his gains would stop and even regress if he ate anything off the diet. Each time, I saw the impact of what avoiding certain foods would do for his growth. Rather than regress if you limit his foods, you'll likely see big gains and quickly because even if he's hungry and irritable his thinking will be more clear.

My son said Momma at 6 1/2 months and then didn't say a sound, not even babbling, until he was 13 months old. Two days after I took him off diary and gluten he began to mimic my speech. The change was dramatic.

Let us know how it goes. I am guessing you'll see big changes in a matter of weeks.

I should also put my plug in for homeopathic remedies. Dissolved in water, they are easy to give to a child with oral sensitivities, and will help with symptoms like sleeplessness and irritability. Ask your ND for suggestions.

Best
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#5 of 15 Old 07-12-2014, 06:12 AM
 
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I have to be GF, and you can find alternatives that are very close. You may be able to substitute them without your son even realizing (tatse them yourself first). Look online for options, don't rely on what's in the stores. You can also find recipes. I really like the "Allergy Proof Recipes for Kids" cookbook, the recipes are pretty easy and straightforward, and it's kid-friendly.

If you can find a way to replace the foods he's eating with safe substitutes, it may be easy to make the changes as you at least won't be limiting what he's eating even more. He may not take the substitutes, but it's worth a shot.

(as a warning: Don't start with pizza. Maybe homemade GF/CF pizza crust is okay, but I've never found a store-made one that didn't taste of despair. Also, while some dairy substitutes taste good, they almost never actually taste like dairy, so you might be better off avoiding them to start. At minimum, don't say "try this yogurt!")

Also, I know this is daunting- but do your research. Look up how to cook gf/cf so that you can make yummy meals for the whole family. Find out everything that may have hidden gluten/casein (sauces are a big place- did you know soy sauce has more wheat than soy in it?). You do not want to be putting in the effort of restricting his diet only to find out that he's still been eating gluten/casein without you realizing it.

It's really common for people to be able to handle more foods when you take the problem foods out of their diet. There likely will be a very scary, difficult period where you feel like you're starving him. If you do a lot of research first, that will be easier- I didn't prepare myself nearly well enough to go off gluten, so I spent a few weeks starving because I had a really hard time figuring out what else I could eat. When we took kiddo off of gluten, it was old hat for me and a complete non-issue. Even if he'd been old enough to demand nothing but bread and chicken nuggets, I knew how to make/get gluten free options and say "Here you go". It's very scary at the start, but it's worth it and after a while it'll be normal. I haven't even been gluten free for an entire year, it only took a few months to really get used to it.

I can honestly say that a few weeks of starving is well worth a lifetime of feeling better. It may be hard to know if it is while you're going through it, but when you come out the other end, you'll be glad you did.

I agree that framing it differently will help. If you left your son with the wrong babysitter, who gave him a glass of beer, and he came back refusing to drink anything but beer- would you give in, or stand your ground until he realized that he needed to drink what was healthy for him? Gluten/casein both feel like "food" to you right now, and it's hard to deny your child "food" when he's hungry- but that's not what they are. Not to him. They're damaging. If he also has celiac's (not sure if you've had him tested), then they're even inhibiting his ability to get nutrients- so he's starving himself by eating gluten. (I don't know for sure if non-celiac sensitivities can do this, although I believe that they can)

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#6 of 15 Old 07-13-2014, 01:23 PM
 
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This was our experience, too. We were worried that she just wouldn't eat, but when we eliminated the preferred/problem foods, she quickly adapted, and will now eat basically anything (there are a few foods she dislikes, but who doesn't have a few foods they dislike?).
sillysapling likes this.

DS born 6/03, DD1 born 9/06, DD2 born 10/10, DD3 born 4/14.
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#7 of 15 Old 07-14-2014, 04:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
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It is a leap of faith, I grant you. I absolutely needed to hear that this worked from other parents, 10 years ago, when I put my son on a gf/cf diet for the first time. Then, every step of the way, I needed to strengthen my resolve, as once he was on the diet, I needed to understand that his gains would stop and even regress if he ate anything off the diet. Each time, I saw the impact of what avoiding certain foods would do for his growth. Rather than regress if you limit his foods, you'll likely see big gains and quickly because even if he's hungry and irritable his thinking will be more clear.

My son said Momma at 6 1/2 months and then didn't say a sound, not even babbling, until he was 13 months old. Two days after I took him off diary and gluten he began to mimic my speech. The change was dramatic.

Let us know how it goes. I am guessing you'll see big changes in a matter of weeks.

I should also put my plug in for homeopathic remedies. Dissolved in water, they are easy to give to a child with oral sensitivities, and will help with symptoms like sleeplessness and irritability. Ask your ND for suggestions.

Best
Thanks livinglife - I am getting ready to take the leap! I am definitely intimidated by it but already feel better now I'm planning it out. I decided to phase out gluten over a week or two in the hopes it will be gentler transition. And I'm interested in looking into homeopathic options - I was raised on homeopathy as my mum took me to a homeopath when I was little for my eczema (amazing results) and had many remedies she used for us as kids. and then my bf's mom trained as a homeopathic doctor when I was a teen.

One more question - with gluten and dairy was it your experience that one was a worse offender than the other?

thanks!
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#8 of 15 Old 07-14-2014, 04:29 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I have to be GF, and you can find alternatives that are very close. You may be able to substitute them without your son even realizing (tatse them yourself first). Look online for options, don't rely on what's in the stores. You can also find recipes. I really like the "Allergy Proof Recipes for Kids" cookbook, the recipes are pretty easy and straightforward, and it's kid-friendly.

If you can find a way to replace the foods he's eating with safe substitutes, it may be easy to make the changes as you at least won't be limiting what he's eating even more. He may not take the substitutes, but it's worth a shot.

(as a warning: Don't start with pizza. Maybe homemade GF/CF pizza crust is okay, but I've never found a store-made one that didn't taste of despair. Also, while some dairy substitutes taste good, they almost never actually taste like dairy, so you might be better off avoiding them to start. At minimum, don't say "try this yogurt!")

Also, I know this is daunting- but do your research. Look up how to cook gf/cf so that you can make yummy meals for the whole family. Find out everything that may have hidden gluten/casein (sauces are a big place- did you know soy sauce has more wheat than soy in it?). You do not want to be putting in the effort of restricting his diet only to find out that he's still been eating gluten/casein without you realizing it.

It's really common for people to be able to handle more foods when you take the problem foods out of their diet. There likely will be a very scary, difficult period where you feel like you're starving him. If you do a lot of research first, that will be easier- I didn't prepare myself nearly well enough to go off gluten, so I spent a few weeks starving because I had a really hard time figuring out what else I could eat. When we took kiddo off of gluten, it was old hat for me and a complete non-issue. Even if he'd been old enough to demand nothing but bread and chicken nuggets, I knew how to make/get gluten free options and say "Here you go". It's very scary at the start, but it's worth it and after a while it'll be normal. I haven't even been gluten free for an entire year, it only took a few months to really get used to it.

I can honestly say that a few weeks of starving is well worth a lifetime of feeling better. It may be hard to know if it is while you're going through it, but when you come out the other end, you'll be glad you did.

I agree that framing it differently will help. If you left your son with the wrong babysitter, who gave him a glass of beer, and he came back refusing to drink anything but beer- would you give in, or stand your ground until he realized that he needed to drink what was healthy for him? Gluten/casein both feel like "food" to you right now, and it's hard to deny your child "food" when he's hungry- but that's not what they are. Not to him. They're damaging. If he also has celiac's (not sure if you've had him tested), then they're even inhibiting his ability to get nutrients- so he's starving himself by eating gluten. (I don't know for sure if non-celiac sensitivities can do this, although I believe that they can)
This is all very good to know! thank you sillysapling!
Ds is not celiac, in fact there are no noticeable physical effects of dairy or gluten , but he has developmental delays in several areas and sensory issues, and hearing that gfcf diet has made such a big difference to kids with similar struggles makes me feel that we need to try this properly, even if it ends up not helping, we need to do it properly and know that we tried. From everything i've researched, it sounds like it could be a really good thing that could make a real difference.

I will certainly have challenges with subbing in different foods as he is so rigid about what he is able to eat - he notices instantly when a food is different but we will have to persevere and find foods that he can manage and i do hope, enjoy.

I had a chuckle at the 'pizza crust of despair' - so aptly put! I will be sure to test the foods first! I have a neighbour who is strictly gluten free due to colitis who told me yesterday that there's a place in our town that does a decent pizza crust, hooray!

thanks for all teh info, much appreciated!
lottie
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#9 of 15 Old 07-14-2014, 04:35 PM - Thread Starter
 
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This was our experience, too. We were worried that she just wouldn't eat, but when we eliminated the preferred/problem foods, she quickly adapted, and will now eat basically anything (there are a few foods she dislikes, but who doesn't have a few foods they dislike?).
That's great to hear ocelotmom! Could I ask how long before you could see a difference and was it gluten or dairy or both that you removed? I know every kid is different and unique but hearing the experiences of others is really encouraging and hope-giving!
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#10 of 15 Old 07-14-2014, 08:41 PM
 
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I honestly don't remember - this was 6 years or so ago. I know that, when she gets exposed to something now, we can tell within a few hours. (This is also not my own child, but a girl we've been housemates with for the past 8 years.)

It wasn't an overnight switch - I think we cut out dairy a while before gluten, because I recall making vegan macaroni and cheese (which was not a hit with her).

But the difference is really drastic, both in general health and in behavior, and noticeable to people outside the immediate household who worked with her.

DS born 6/03, DD1 born 9/06, DD2 born 10/10, DD3 born 4/14.
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#11 of 15 Old 07-15-2014, 01:30 AM
 
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This is all very good to know! thank you sillysapling!
Ds is not celiac, in fact there are no noticeable physical effects of dairy or gluten , but he has developmental delays in several areas and sensory issues, and hearing that gfcf diet has made such a big difference to kids with similar struggles makes me feel that we need to try this properly, even if it ends up not helping, we need to do it properly and know that we tried. From everything i've researched, it sounds like it could be a really good thing that could make a real difference.

I will certainly have challenges with subbing in different foods as he is so rigid about what he is able to eat - he notices instantly when a food is different but we will have to persevere and find foods that he can manage and i do hope, enjoy.
You may find out that there are physical effects you weren't aware of. It's amazing how much more pain I lived with on gluten- it was something that was just constant and I just assumed was normal.

Substituting foods isn't easy. Some recipes are more successful than others, and if you have a very picky eater he may just refuse anything. Breaded things like chicken nuggets may be a little easier because most of the rest of the taste is the same. If there are any safe foods he'll eat, you may need to focus on those for a little while, while introducing other foods.

(on introducing other foods- I've seen it suggested that you provide kids with a napkin and liked drink, and say it's okay to spit it into the napkin if they don't like it. It can make it less scary for picky eaters. I know there are some foods that I've tried that I just could not swallow.)

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That's great to hear ocelotmom! Could I ask how long before you could see a difference and was it gluten or dairy or both that you removed? I know every kid is different and unique but hearing the experiences of others is really encouraging and hope-giving!
This depends on how the transition period goes. For me, I cut gluten out gradually over the course of a few months, and then didn't realize the big impact until I tried adding it back in. Part of the problem was, again, I had not prepared myself and so some of the benefits were outweighed by not getting enough to eat and the psychological difficulties.

I imagine you'll be facing this with your kid no matter how much planning you do, because he's got such a restricted diet based on foods that make him sick. Psychologically, it's hard to give up your comfort foods, and it'll make it harder for him to get enough to eat.

I've heard it can take 6 months for gluten to totally get out of a kid's system, but you should see results faster. You might see results more quickly if you cut both out at once, but that will also be a much harder transition period.

I've heard it takes 6 months for gluten to totally get out of a kid's system, but you should see results before that.

Also, it's not a linear progression. If you see progress and then have a really bad day where he gets super upset about everything he's not allowed to eat- that's normal. Sometimes it hits you. Going out to eat is going to be rough, possibly forever. Try to go to places with a separate gluten free menu (if they have a gf/cf menu, all the better, but I've never seen one) so that he doesn't have to stare at all the things he's not allowed to eat. Make sure his friends' parents know before he goes to anyone's house, and try to make it as much of a non-issue for him as possible.

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#12 of 15 Old 07-15-2014, 09:13 AM
 
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Hi Lottie, sorry i'm just getting back to your question. Which one, gluten or dairy, was the worst offender? I believe that they both were equally so. There are a lot of theories why this is so, but, in my experience with my son, and our whole family actually, a little, in tiny trace amounts has been fine...for example, if his fries have a batter on it, or a bit of cheese slipped into the salad when we're out to eat. It's because, I think, these are high glutamate foods. I think underlying his developmental problems is a difficulty metabolizing glutamate. (Dr. Amy Yasko writes about this...look for her website) This is likely not true of every child on the spectrum, in fact, since I believe "spectrum" disorders are really a way of identifying symptoms with many different underlying problems, this is why the diet doesn't work for everyone. My daughter, who is not on the spectrum and never has been, is also on the diet, and she has had some slight gross and fine motor issues that are resolving.

So, to answer your question, they both don't work for us...but tiny trace amounts won't set us off the edge. However, in years past, we experimented, and my son would have a couple of "treats" a week, like pizza or icecream. One week of this was fine, two weeks, not looking good, three weeks and he's over the edge, so I think it's also cumulative for him. That's why, there's no more "treats" and we just find all the yummy alternatives we like so much.

I'll put a plug in for coconut milk icecream, kinnickinik donuts (they are great!) and chocolate almond milk. Udi's bread is also a very close approximation of the real thing....my kids friends can't tell the difference, and kinnickinik also makes a great gluten free pizza crust. Daiya cheese almost taste real, and melts into a grill cheese sandwich to die for. They also make a great dairy, soy and gluten free cream cheese. Hungry yet!?? You can tell it's lunch time here

Great that you use remedies. I'll actually be going back to school in the fall to earn a degree in homeopathy
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#13 of 15 Old 07-18-2014, 08:50 AM - Thread Starter
 
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You may find out that there are physical effects you weren't aware of. It's amazing how much more pain I lived with on gluten- it was something that was just constant and I just assumed was normal.

Substituting foods isn't easy. Some recipes are more successful than others, and if you have a very picky eater he may just refuse anything. Breaded things like chicken nuggets may be a little easier because most of the rest of the taste is the same. If there are any safe foods he'll eat, you may need to focus on those for a little while, while introducing other foods.

(on introducing other foods- I've seen it suggested that you provide kids with a napkin and liked drink, and say it's okay to spit it into the napkin if they don't like it. It can make it less scary for picky eaters. I know there are some foods that I've tried that I just could not swallow.)


This depends on how the transition period goes. For me, I cut gluten out gradually over the course of a few months, and then didn't realize the big impact until I tried adding it back in. Part of the problem was, again, I had not prepared myself and so some of the benefits were outweighed by not getting enough to eat and the psychological difficulties.

I imagine you'll be facing this with your kid no matter how much planning you do, because he's got such a restricted diet based on foods that make him sick. Psychologically, it's hard to give up your comfort foods, and it'll make it harder for him to get enough to eat.

I've heard it can take 6 months for gluten to totally get out of a kid's system, but you should see results faster. You might see results more quickly if you cut both out at once, but that will also be a much harder transition period.

I've heard it takes 6 months for gluten to totally get out of a kid's system, but you should see results before that.

Also, it's not a linear progression. If you see progress and then have a really bad day where he gets super upset about everything he's not allowed to eat- that's normal. Sometimes it hits you. Going out to eat is going to be rough, possibly forever. Try to go to places with a separate gluten free menu (if they have a gf/cf menu, all the better, but I've never seen one) so that he doesn't have to stare at all the things he's not allowed to eat. Make sure his friends' parents know before he goes to anyone's house, and try to make it as much of a non-issue for him as possible.
thanks *so* much ocelotmom, sillysapling and livinglife! I've been busy packing and planning gluten free foods for a week long camping trip. I decided to do a 'weaning' rather than complete cold turkey but have already drastically cut back gluten but am going to have to live with it this week if we end up with a little here and there as a peaceful happy camping trip with friends is good for him and constant hungry meltdowns will be miserable for all, but when we get back it. is. on. - i really appreciate all the info and input on this. im actually quite excited about it now to see what changing diet could do for our little guy. i'll probably be back with more questions if you don't mind! one quick question - porridge oats - i read that they can contain traces of gluten due to wheat being present when they are grown or processed, is it likely there is really gluten in them? are there any brands in north america that are gluten free? it would really help to be able to make muffins and smoothies and porridge with oats. scottish background means my kids love porridge and i can add so many great extras in to it.
congrats on going back to school to be a homeopath livinglife!
have a great week! lottie
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#14 of 15 Old 07-18-2014, 02:47 PM
 
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There are two problems with oats. The first is that they may be cross-contaminated. The second is that they contain a protein similar to gluten (avenin), which some people sensitive to gluten have a problem with. Therefore, it might make the most sense to drop them until he's had a chance to get gluten out of his system, then reintroduce them and see if they cause a problem.

Bob's Red Mill oats are tested to be sure they're free of gluten and processed in a gluten-free facility, so if any oats are ok, they should be.

DS born 6/03, DD1 born 9/06, DD2 born 10/10, DD3 born 4/14.
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#15 of 15 Old 07-18-2014, 04:57 PM
 
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A great replacement for oats is quinoa flakes made by the brand Ancient Harvest. You add water to it to made a hot breakfast cereal. I use quinoa flakes to make matzah balls for chicken soup (eggs, quinoa flakes, shape into a ball and add to very hot bubbling soup, cook for 15 minutes) It's expensive but you can buy it online from health food companies for a lot less than what you'll buy it for in the supermarket.

Last edited by livinglife; 07-19-2014 at 04:11 AM. Reason: typo's
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