Child study/IEP meeting tomorrow- PDD NOS - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 6 Old 01-14-2015, 07:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Child study/IEP meeting tomorrow- PDD NOS

Anxious but glad to be on the path to help my son, 8 years old 3rd grade, get the help he needs. Does anyone have any advice regarding the meeting? I have written some notes that I took from my initial PDD NOS thread around Thanksgiving regarding potential accommodations that might help. I still haven't come to terms with this completely, as far as him being in the special education program, but he has been struggling in school since he was 3. Each year would bring some new horror- yet another way he doesn't fit in, can't stay organized, won't say hello, won't make eye-contact etc. It has to get better for everyone's sake. Here's hoping it goes well and this is an understanding group of professionals!

Book lovin librarian nerd mama to Caleb 6/06 and Aiden 4/09: and 1 angel 11/07. "No one cries alone in my presence."
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#2 of 6 Old 01-14-2015, 09:00 PM
 
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I hope everything goes well. I recommend taking something to write on, in case you want to take some notes. If there is a person in your life who you like to have with you because they are supportive, you can bring them. You don't have to agree to anything tomorrow if it doesn't feel right or you want sleep on it. You have a legal right (under federal law) to be part of the decision making process. Not just sign off on things, but be part of decision making.


My DD's dx is also PDD-NOS, and she is now 18. School stuff was hard off and on. I had my own reasons for being concerned about special education, but eventually I made my peace with it and now work in it! Is there a reason why you aren't comfortable with him being part of special education?


In a lot of ways, it gives kids a protective bubble. They are given goals that are right for them, rather than what the state legislature feels all kids should know. The often receive instruction in smaller groups with enhanced curriculum. In high school, they have an advocate that looks out for them, and they are allowed to use notes on tests. There are even accommodations in college. Being in special education doesn't limit your son's options, it just means that he is given more help and support.


My daughter will ALWAYS have autism. It is part of who she is. But she still has a great life. She drives a car. She attends community college and is making progress towards an associates (and then plans on a BA). She reads and gardens. She is thinking about volunteering at a used bookstore run by the friends of the library. She talks very little, and has few friends. But she is happy and productive, and isn't that what we want for all our kids?

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#3 of 6 Old 01-15-2015, 07:15 PM
 
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how did the meeting go?

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#4 of 6 Old Yesterday, 05:18 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Update- sorry for delay!

I'm sorry for the delay, we're going through a divorce and I'm adapting to single parenting or course working FT and covering all the appointments for DS and recovering from DHs infidelity so reeling and TIRED.

The meeting IS the child study- uh, I didn't know that. I thought the child study was a verb- as in a process of studying the child, trial and error. It seems that it would make sense rather than just guess and randomly add accommodations that may or may not help and write them in stone. Anyhoo, the special education advisor said he does have a disability, he does require accommodations to succeed BUT she is not aware of how special education would help him. She said he's better off not to go into special ed as then they will give him an entirely new/reduced curriculum and he wont learn the things that his peers do? He scored fine on his tests as far as being on level BUT he is failing classes consistently because he fails quizzes and tests in a classroom environment. He has a hard time with writing, adding detail- pediatrician noted this and advised OT for low muscle tone.

DS has a 504 and they are going to basically increase rigor on the positive behavior plan and get him in small group reading and pull him for major state tests. We're meeting back in a month or two to review.

Book lovin librarian nerd mama to Caleb 6/06 and Aiden 4/09: and 1 angel 11/07. "No one cries alone in my presence."
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#5 of 6 Old Yesterday, 10:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heatherweh View Post
Anyhoo, the special education advisor said he does have a disability, he does require accommodations to succeed BUT she is not aware of how special education would help him. She said he's better off not to go into special ed as then they will give him an entirely new/reduced curriculum and he wont learn the things that his peers do?

The way it usually works is that the kids who have special needs and are in a regular classroom are pulled out at certain times to work on key skills areas of reading, writing, and math. They miss out on what their classroom is doing during that time, usually science and social studies, but sometimes art, music, PE, recess etc. Because the kids are overall working below grade level, the pull out time is at a lower level to meet the needs of those students. It's kind of a sucky deal, but for some kids, it is the thing that makes the most sense. For your son, though, it wouldn't help or make sense.


How did they determine he is on level? What tests did they use, and how well aligned is it to the actual classroom expectations? Some of the tests that have been around forever and are well respected are not in alignment with current standards because all the standards keep going up. Common core tests and curriculum emphasis higher order thinking skills while some tests of student achievement do not.


Is the school going to provide OT? Does he do better with typing at this point? It is easier for kids with fine motor issues than hand writing, but it is still tough, especially when they are learning to type.


Quote:
DS has a 504 and they are going to basically increase rigor on the positive behavior plan and get him in small group reading and pull him for major state tests. We're meeting back in a month or two to review.


This is a good first step. Are they going to try accommodations for regular classroom quizzes and tests? If he continues to receive failing marks, I would ask for alternate assessment for classroom work, such as being quizzed orally by the teacher. My personal deal as a parent was that if my kid was doing her best and basically understood the content, she should get at least a C, and that they needed to accommodate her to make that happen, even though she had very limited to ability to show what she knew in writing. (BTW, kids can have accommodation for testing right through college!)


Also, her 504 stated that assignments requiring writing could be modified to ensure success. Frequently, she do fewer problems, or just write the answer instead of writing a complete sentence, or write 3 sentences instead of an essay, or have me type it up instead of her writing.


It's great that they are going to emphasize positive behavior plan.


Do they know about the struggles you guys are going through at home? In some cities, there are agencies that work with families who have a special needs child to address behavior challenges at home, doing functional behavior assessments of behavior occurring at home and helping parents come up with realistic and helpful behavior plans for home. The special needs teacher/advocate or the school social worker might be good people to talk to about what other supports your community has. You may be eligible for respite care, there may be summer programs and so on. These kinds of things are usually offered through a patch work of agencies, and while they aren't offered through the school, the school might be able to help you through the maze.


Also - I just want to send you and your kids a bunch of big hugs. I know this is a very difficult time for all of you in many ways.

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#6 of 6 Unread Today, 07:09 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post
The way it usually works is that the kids who have special needs and are in a regular classroom are pulled out at certain times to work on key skills areas of reading, writing, and math. They miss out on what their classroom is doing during that time, usually science and social studies, but sometimes art, music, PE, recess etc. Because the kids are overall working below grade level, the pull out time is at a lower level to meet the needs of those students. It's kind of a sucky deal, but for some kids, it is the thing that makes the most sense. For your son, though, it wouldn't help or make sense.


How did they determine he is on level? What tests did they use, and how well aligned is it to the actual classroom expectations? Some of the tests that have been around forever and are well respected are not in alignment with current standards because all the standards keep going up. Common core tests and curriculum emphasis higher order thinking skills while some tests of student achievement do not.


Is the school going to provide OT? Does he do better with typing at this point? It is easier for kids with fine motor issues than hand writing, but it is still tough, especially when they are learning to type.






This is a good first step. Are they going to try accommodations for regular classroom quizzes and tests? If he continues to receive failing marks, I would ask for alternate assessment for classroom work, such as being quizzed orally by the teacher. My personal deal as a parent was that if my kid was doing her best and basically understood the content, she should get at least a C, and that they needed to accommodate her to make that happen, even though she had very limited to ability to show what she knew in writing. (BTW, kids can have accommodation for testing right through college!)


Also, her 504 stated that assignments requiring writing could be modified to ensure success. Frequently, she do fewer problems, or just write the answer instead of writing a complete sentence, or write 3 sentences instead of an essay, or have me type it up instead of her writing.


It's great that they are going to emphasize positive behavior plan.


Do they know about the struggles you guys are going through at home? In some cities, there are agencies that work with families who have a special needs child to address behavior challenges at home, doing functional behavior assessments of behavior occurring at home and helping parents come up with realistic and helpful behavior plans for home. The special needs teacher/advocate or the school social worker might be good people to talk to about what other supports your community has. You may be eligible for respite care, there may be summer programs and so on. These kinds of things are usually offered through a patch work of agencies, and while they aren't offered through the school, the school might be able to help you through the maze.


Also - I just want to send you and your kids a bunch of big hugs. I know this is a very difficult time for all of you in many ways.


Thank you and thank you for the ideas and response. Yes there is a lot going on at the moment.

Book lovin librarian nerd mama to Caleb 6/06 and Aiden 4/09: and 1 angel 11/07. "No one cries alone in my presence."
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