Apraxia... and a 6yo... how much does that diagnosis really matter? - Mothering Forums

 
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#1 of 5 Old 01-02-2016, 06:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Apraxia... and a 6yo... how much does that diagnosis really matter?

I have an odd situation because I THINK my 6yo's speech issues are transitioning and changing to more Apraxia-like. His fluency.
His SLOWness, the inconsistency of errors.
His official diagnosis of Articulation Disorder was never fully founded, but because he didn't fit "apraxia" when he was younger, they didn't know what else to put -- his only official diagnosis by an SLP outside of the school district was at 2.5yo when they labeled that "AD" and it's carried with him all this time.
For 3yrs he backed nearly every consonant, so it was hard to tell what was going on with him because while he Could say every sound, he didn't in actual speech.

That is no longer the case.

He now can produce every sound.
Within reason and for his age, of course. F/TH/W/any s-combo... there are still huge errors and maybe articulation is still an issue. He's about 70% understood... so he still has Huge issues to combat.

but back to Apraxia... so much of the fluency side of Apraxia fits him.
He says sentences but incredibly slow... it's like processing in a way... his mouth just can't keep up with where his brain wants him to go. He can say the word, but drops the articulation in a sentence; or once he gets the sentence going, all articulation is lost once he tries to sing it. He just can't keep up with fluency. -- Twinkle Twinkle is a great example of one we repeatedly practice because he Wants to sing so badly but cannot keep up with the speed (and the kid has rhythm... just can't make it happen with his mouth).

I have him in private "Speech time" with an SLP student -- who offers no "therapy", of course, just drill drill drill. And when she has a question she goes to her professors, who observe her once every few months. That professor was the first to say... Apraxia.

Then a friend over Xmas who is a licensed SLP said.. Apraxia.
And that was after just a few minutes. She said that in her experience many SLP's get caught up in the functioning of the mouth/lips/tongue and not the later fluency issues. She thinks he's textbook for a 6yo.. She also lives hours away and cannot be daily help in our lives

Doesn't matter with the schools.... because he has graduated out of speech therapy (regardless of diagnosis) because all they care about in NC for kindergarten is the ability to make age-appropriate sounds, which he can make. So he will not get services after this year.

SO MY QUESTION... apologies on the babbling....
Why would I care about a diagnosis?

I have him in speech time 2x a week where I define, not the student, what we do... and I'm scouring the internet for apraxia-therapies and finding a ton of resources.

School puts all speech diagnosis in the same umbrella for therapies for Kindergarten, so school is not a consideration -- YET.

And I have no insurance, and a single-mom, which is why the SLP student has been AH-MAZING this past year.... so much help and wonderful drill, for a fraction of the cost.

But What am I potentially missing out on?

An Actual testing could show not only apraxia, but dyspraxia or a myriad of other options that I'm not aware of, because I'm just a mom.... ?

Would an actual diagnosis help down the road - say a resource teacher at 2nd grade who sees, oh he has apraxia and now we're seeing some learning disorders, and a potential bridge between the two.... ?

What else?

Why should I care about an official diagnosis at this point?

Thank you for your ideas because I twist & turn at this. One day I feel like I'm doing great with just the student... other days I am so terrified that I'm missing something and ultimately failing him for the future of his speech (oh the guilt..... hate being broke). Enyhoo... Thank you for any ideas!

single, WAH mom, to my only very kind & sweet lil man
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#2 of 5 Old 01-02-2016, 07:10 PM
 
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Would an actual diagnosis help down the road - say a resource teacher at 2nd grade who sees, oh he has apraxia and now we're seeing some learning disorders, and a potential bridge between the two.... ?
....
Thank you for your ideas because I twist & turn at this. One day I feel like I'm doing great with just the student... other days I am so terrified that I'm missing something and ultimately failing him for the future of his speech (oh the guilt..... hate being broke). Enyhoo... Thank you for any ideas!


Hi, I'm a resource teacher. I work tightly with my SLP but I am not an speech expert. Kids with speech issues tend to have a harder time learning to decode and encode. Sorting out when a speech issue becomes a reading issue is a whole sticky deal, and you are right that 2nd grade is a time when it comes up a lot. However, an actual diagnosis now won't help then. If he has difficulty with reading at that point, they will want to do their own testing at that time. Kids have to be significantly beyond and show significant discrepancies to qualify -- I think the exact details vary from state to state. But just because a child has speech issues with a lovely diagnosis and are a little behind in reading, it doesn't follow that they can qualify for sp. ed. reading services. (We get around it at our school because we follow an inclusion model, and some of the speech kids who just need a little extra help by don't really qualify are in the class as "non-disabled peers.")


I think it sounds like you are doing a fabulous job at getting him extra help. I really love having college students work with kids because they are so enthusiastic. There's no magic wand that is given out at graduation. (My own special needs daughter is now in college and I got her hooked up with college senior majoring in special ed to be her buddy and help her out -- it's freakin awesome!). Yet I think questioning yourself is just part of the deal of being the parent of a child with challenges -- Am I doing enough? Am I doing the right things? If I made a slightly different choice would my child end up better off? It can be crazy making.


How does he do with phonemic awareness? This is struggle for many kids with speech issues. I really like the series Get Ready for the Code, Get Set for the Code, Go for the Code.
Amazon Amazon
These were very helpful for my own daughter, and I use the later books from this series with my students now.

but everything has pros and consĀ  shrug.gif

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#3 of 5 Old 01-02-2016, 08:03 PM - Thread Starter
 
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How does he do with phonemic awareness? This is struggle for many kids with speech issues. I really like the series Get Ready for the Code, Get Set for the Code, Go for the Code. .
THANK YOU!!

I'll share a story.... this summer the speech student realized my kiddo was not only backing his sounds, he was producing them through his Nose. I'd never noticed that (because I'm not an SLP!). She had him hold his nose through a series of sound drills. And in one lesson, completely changed how he pronounced like 5 different consonants. Immediate change!

I agree that I love this student because it gives her experience. And she has so much enthusiasm and comes from a place of really wanting to help - this is her first experience of putting her knowledge to a test. And she is smart... she knows her limitations on what she can and cannot say to me and she always defers to her professors.
Her help has been a complete game-changer for the articulation of the kiddo.... and why he is beyond basic school testing.

BUT about my Thanks to you... I am a smart person and I know how to research. But I am just a mom. This was one of those lightbulb moments that... I didn't even know what your sentence meant, until I followed the link and looked at the book. OH THAT... oh, yes, Phonemes. SO important. OK... I'll look in to that now And I can tell you.... He doesn't understand how to break down a word, AT ALL. He has great memory so his sight words are amazing, even through Xmas and not keeping up on them, he can read texts on my phone. But he has difficulty sounding out words... although I'm not sure that his class is working on that yet. But I will certainly start!!!

This is why I worry that I'm missing something. Because I just don't know what to look for.
Thank you for this. And your words.

single, WAH mom, to my only very kind & sweet lil man
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#4 of 5 Old 01-02-2016, 08:14 PM
 
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This is why I worry that I'm missing something. Because I just don't know what to look for.


But because you keep looking, you will figure it out.


I really understand where you are coming from, because I've been there.


One last piece of advice -- try to enjoy your child. Take pictures, do fun things. Enjoy him being 6. This time goes by so fast. One of my few parenting regrets is that I spent so much time worrying and researching, and not enough just in the moment with my kid.

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#5 of 5 Old 01-08-2016, 07:47 AM
 
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You're in the us, right? Have you spoken to social services about getting him on medicaid? I know it varies by state, but even in states with crappy medicaid they'll usually cover kids even if they won't cover the parents and if he's special needs that also could qualify him
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