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#121 of 241 Old 08-27-2006, 03:49 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Good luck to you and your DD, Judejude.
eclipse, welcome.
You are probably looking at O.T. either through school or privately to deal with SID. We have a similar problem with noise for our son who is also entering K. I plan to help the teacher be aware of his sensitivities, and help her and my son recognize when he needs a break away from the noise. In class, maybe just go to a quieter corner of the room. I'm thinking maybe earplugs for the days they go to the gym. I might ask the principal if we can be warned about fire drill days, I'm afraid one of those could make him uneasy for days afterward, anticipating that "it" might happen again.
Jewelie,
Some thoughts about the baby issue, 2 things that can be difficult for SID kids is unpredictability (as Judejude mentioned), and change. So if something wasn't allowed, and now it is, then she could be having difficulty accepting the change. I wouldn't force her to share, but try to get to the bottom of why she is having trouble with it. Maybe she's afraid the baby will lose her toy, so she might benefit from a plan that shows her how the toy will be safely returned to her. See if there are parallels between this sharing problem and other issues, that might not even seem related on the surface. For example, if she freaks out whenever she can't find something, then maybe it is a fear of something being lost. Or, if she is also nervous around pets, then maybe it's the unpredictability of what baby might do to her stuff. I have generally found it to be unproductive to force my SID kids to do anything that isn't absolutely necessary. However, I have used rewards AKA bribes to "make" them do something. I don't feel guilty about it because so often they don't know they can do certain things because they don't try. Then when they receive the natural rewards of something like sharing, they might have an easier time doing it the next time. But be sure to point out the natural reward very clearly, enthusiastically and repeatedly, like, "now that you are sharing see how much fun you can have with your sister."
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#122 of 241 Old 08-27-2006, 12:12 PM
 
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Good luck Judejude. I hope the surgery and all the stuff before hand goes well and the folks are very understanding this time.
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#123 of 241 Old 09-04-2006, 05:36 PM
 
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Hi,
I just found this thread, and I haven't read all of it yet, but I do want to go nack and read it.

I'm trying to figure out if my dd1 has some kind of sensory issue.

She is very impulsive, has agression issues that have been going on for the entire duration of her younger sister's life, she makes loud noises and does a lot of big movement. It's hard to figure out if her behaviours are aga-appropriate or not, but as she grows older and they don't go away, I feel more and more like she needs more help than we are giving her.

I found this list of syspmtoms/signs and marked the ones I see in her often
Young children are, by nature, active. We expect the toddler to be "into things" and the preschooler to be curious, to explore and to play vigorously. We don't expect the young child to have a very long attention span. Characteristics which indicate problems in one child may be perfectly normal in a younger child. Here are some warning signals related to activity levels:

1. The child is disorganized and lacks purpose in his or her activity. This is the child who goes through the room like a tornado. Even though the child may appear to be interested in a toy or object initially, once he gets it he may throw it aside, dump it out of the container, or immediately be distracted by something else. Another characteristic is that the child lacks exploration or manipulation; he may dump objects out of a container or off a shelf without stopping to manipulate, visually examine, or play creatively with them. On the playground the child may run around a lot but does not organize his activity to climb, swing, or explore equipment.

2. The child does not move around or explore the environment. This is the "good" baby or toddler who is content to stay in one place and does not make many demands on his or her caretakers. This child may be content to watch things in his environment although he is physically able to move around and interact. The older child may use good verbal skills to engage the adult in conversation as a way of avoiding manipulating with his hands or actively engaging in activity.

3. The child lacks variety in play activities. Some children become very repetitive or stereotypic in playing with toys. Everything may be flung aside, tapped on a surface, or brought to the mouth. Another child may prefer only visual activities (TV, videos, looking at books) while avoiding visual-motor or manipulative toys (coloring, drawing, clay, construction toys.) Other children may learn one way to interact with a toy or playground equipment without adding variations, creative play, or generalizing to other similar objects. For example, the child may line up toy cars but does not pretend they are going places or experiment with rolling them down an incline.

4. The child appears clumsy, trips easily, has poor balance. The child may experience an excessive number of bumps, bruises, stitches, or broken bones. Sometimes this child seems always to be in a hurry and impulsive, does not "look where he is going." Other children may always be bumping their heads because they lack protective responses and do not "catch themselves" when they begin to fall.

5. The child has difficulty calming himself after exciting physical activity or after becoming upset. After this child "loses it" he cannot be consoled. Tantrums may last for hours, or the child may become so excited after vigorous play that he continues high activity levels long after the event. Some children regularly escalate their activity levels during the day without experiencing "down time" or being able to engage in quiet activity. Dinner time becomes chaotic and the child has extreme difficulty falling asleep at bedtime.

6. The child seeks excessive amounts of vigorous sensory input. Many children like to jump, swing, and spin; but when this is excessive, it may be problematic. The child may spin himself on playground equipment or twirl around a room for prolonged periods without experiencing dizziness. Another child may continually throw himself on the floor, deliberately hurl himself against people and things, or jump excessively.

http://www.tsbvi.edu/Outreach/seehea...97/sensory.htm

What next? How can I figure out if she is within normal ranges of behaviour, or if she needs something else?
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#124 of 241 Old 09-04-2006, 05:55 PM
 
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Hi Pam, long time no see... I've been meaning to send you an email, but life has been crazy these days (I'm sure you know what I mean). I'm new to this thread too, but both my kids seem to be experiencing SID issues. Jenna is sensory avoiding, and Callum is sensory seeking. We're going to take Jenna to a privat OT to get her diagnosed, but with Callum still being so young, we put him on the waiting list to get into the clinic at the IWK. It's normally about a 2 year waiting list, but with the strong familly history of both SID and ADD, Callum got shortlisted, and we expect he'll be in sometime in the next 9 months.
You may want to mention Abbie's issues to your GP and try to get her into the IWK clinic for diagnosis. Your GP would be able to give you a better idea too if it would help.
Also, the public library has a couple copies of The Out of Sync Child, and one copy of The Out of Sync Child Has Fun. I can't remember the author, but I'm sure you can find them in the system easy enough. (I currently have them both out, but will be returning them shortly. You may want to get on the waiting list for them, it's usually several people long, though it only took a couple weeks for me to get them).
I hope you manage to find a way through. The books have really helped me to understand what's going on with Jenna, and just shifting my attitude has made a huge difference, and dealing with her issues has gotten a lot easier recently. I hope you find the same thing with Abbie.
I'll try to send you an email soon.
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#125 of 241 Old 09-05-2006, 01:46 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I would recommend, in addition to the Out of Sync Child, the Sensory Sensitive Child by Karen Smith and Karen Gouze. The first book explains very clearly what SID is, I thought the 2nd book explained more about how the sensory issues relate to the behavior that you observe. Another read that might be helpful is the ADD Book by Dr. Sears. The symptoms you described and highlighted sound very much like one of our sons who has ADD and SID. Hard to tell which behaviors come from which problem, but ADD might be something to learn more about in case that might be a factor.
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#126 of 241 Old 09-05-2006, 11:36 AM
 
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Is it possible for a child to be both seeking in some areas, and avoiding in others?

Ex. My dd who jumps on everything, spins, bounces, runs, (into everything and everyone, falls down or hurts herself carelessly at least 20 times a day.) Obvioiusly this is a seeking.

But then she has the, not enjoying light touches, hair being brushed at all, no clothes, no blankets. And she hates sound. Always running from a source of sound somewhere, sometimes even ones we can't hear screaming and crying "its too loud!" so these would be areas of avoiding.

When I usually hear people talking about SID, I usually hear them saying one or the other. Like children will either have avoiding, or seeking. And my child seems to do both.

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#127 of 241 Old 09-06-2006, 04:42 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Children with SID can definitely have both sensory seeking and sensory avoiding behaviors. I think the combo might actually be common. Both our sons are tactile defensive, though in different ways (one can't stand clothing but loves mud, the other can wear anything but can't touch anything messy. Both are sensitive about being touched by others.), and one is vestibular seeking (always bouncing, spins endlessly without getting dizzy), the other is proprioceptive seeking (always throwing or smashing things). O.T. can address all the sensitivities you mentioned.
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#128 of 241 Old 09-07-2006, 10:22 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WitchyMama2
Is it possible for a child to be both seeking in some areas, and avoiding in others?
I would venture to say that all SID children have symptoms in both areas. My DD is mostly an avoider but she is seeking in some ways. I would say she is 85% avoiding and 15% seeking.

The symptoms vary so widely. My DD was an early talker (10 months!) and when I was reading about the traditional SID symptoms, the very first one is "late talker". I completely dismissed the idea that she had SID because of that. Luckily, I came back to it after a few months!
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#129 of 241 Old 09-15-2006, 12:29 AM
 
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Hi Mamas,

I was w/o internet access for a couple weeks and I missed this thread more than anything else!

Judejude, how is your daughter now? I thought of you so many times. I'm glad the surgery went well, hope they were able to get her pain under control quickly! Its so frustrating when med personel don't take anyone's pain seriously, but when its your baby you must want to sock them!

welcome to the new mamas- sorry- I don't know your names yet- have to be quick- must get some sleep!

Thanks everyone for the insight and suggestions about the sharing issue- that was very helpful.

new question (and I think I should start a new thread to get other's thoughts on this one as well). How do you walk the line b/w enouraging emotional regulation but w/o teaching your child to suppress her feelings? I could say alot about this but I think you will know what I mean. I was not ok with our old OT giving her clear messages not to cry but at the same time I could see that she needs to learn to calm herself or catch herself before she goes to this place of hysteria- sometimes I see her taking a deep breath and doing that but other times I can see that she's just stuffing her tears. I struggle to articulate the difference for her. Thoughts?

Also, on a totally unrelated note, the banner I am looking at above, that says "mama art" is my friend and she's awesome- she takes beautiful photos of mamas and children and paints them too. There are photos of my littlest and me on there too. I'm so excited for her. sorry for the plug but I'm just so excited to see it!

thanks,
Julie
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#130 of 241 Old 09-15-2006, 03:18 PM
 
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Ds1 has both sensory seeking and sensory avoiding issues. He hates loud noises, certain smells, and the sun in his eyes. Tags on his shirts bother him, and so do socks and shoes. He loves to flip upside down on the couch, and he loves to play in water. He also likes to swing when he can control it. He hated playing on a merry-go-round this past summer. I'm still waiting to have him reevaluated by an OT though the public school. He's in kindergarten and so far is doing well.
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#131 of 241 Old 09-16-2006, 08:25 PM
 
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Hey all (x-posted in the tribal areas thread as well),

I just wanted to post some info I just found out that I thought might be of interest. I am on an apraxia board that frequently discusses supplements that seem to help our kids (with the main one being omega fatty acids). The new supplement that multiple are trying is Vitamin E. I think it might be something for everyone with kids with sensory issues to check out.

The woman who first posted it has a 3 year old child (I think he's 3 anyway) with apraxia and lot of sensory issues. She is actually a pediatrician too. Long story short she saw rather dramatic results in his sensory issues among other areas within a few days of starting Vitamin E. She says that Vitamin E is important for fatty acid metabolism so maybe (as someone has mentioned around here, but I can't remember who at the moment) fatty acid metabolism issues are part of the problem here.

Anyway she says to start off with 400 IU per day of Vitamin E as a minimum dose even for young kids like 2 or 3. She says the only side effect she knows of is possible bleeding issues, but that is only at super high doses. She actually has her son on a much higher dose than that even and feels secure with it although does not recommend it to most people at this point. She has been in contact with people who she calls "some of the best Vitamin E researchers in the world" and they tell her that really there is no danger in taking it even at super duper high high doses as long as you take the natural (not synthetic form).

Multiple other people on that board have started trying this supplement in the last month and have come back to say they have seen noticeable changes in sensory issues and motor skills within just a couple of days. They tend to see less dramatic changes with speech, but some do see them.

I bought some Vitamin E today and will start Charlotte on it tonight. There does no brand that is more recommended than others. Here's the important thing to look for: make sure you find "d Alpha Tocopheryl" and not "dl Alpha Tocopheryl." The "d" is the natural form and "dl" is the synthetic form. You can find mixes of it with "alpha" and "gamma" forms which is fine and possibly even better to get both forms, but alpha is the main form.

Anyway take it for what you will, but the results these parents were seeing was enough to make me try it and since this mom is also a pediatrician who has looked into the safety of children taking this dosage (including her own child) I feel safe in trying it. You may want to consult a physician before trying it with your own child though.
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#132 of 241 Old 09-17-2006, 03:52 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you for the tip about vitamin E. It's stuff like this that makes me wonder where we'd be without other moms to help.
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#133 of 241 Old 09-17-2006, 10:26 AM
 
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I'm so glad to find this thread. My son was dx with SID about a year ago. We did OT at our local Easter Seals with amazing improvement (13 months development in 7 months of therapy). Our last appointment is actually next week . I know it is time, and we can still call our OT with questions, but it makes me sad to think this critical phase in our son's development is coming to an end. It was a really positive experience for us all.

Our son has both seeking and avoiding tendencies. He seeks physical input (a lot of falling down/running into things around here) but avoids loud noises (and now has the words to tell us when something is "too noisy" or "too loud" which is great).

I hope to learn more on how to further support Ian and I hope to be able to share tips we've learned along the way.

For any parents with kids who NEED to swing (Ian needs his swinging every day), we found this great teardrop shaped swing at IKEA (we put it in his room so we can swing year round - we're in Central IL) - $30 for the whole thing, and Ian loves it. He gets in and you can just see him relax. I'll have to post pics (my sister took a few of him yesterday).

Looking forward to getting to know you!
Karin
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#134 of 241 Old 09-17-2006, 11:48 PM
 
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OK well in case you missed me, I'm back! :

DD had surgery on the 28th and we were in the hospital for 10 days instead of 5 to 7 because dd developed a pressure sore on her back that was quite large. We had to get that dealt with and figure out how to treat it and what kind of services she would need after we left the hospital. It made everything more complicated -- Surgery in the front, Wound in the back!
The wound was caused by the nurses not turning her or changing her bed for 2 days after surgery. I was so focused on her pain that it never even dawned on me. A total of 6 shifts worth of nurses neglected to move her or have her bedding changed, etc. Needless to say things got very crazy at the hospital with them investigating how this could have happened and all the managers on the floor and the pediatricians , etc. became my new best friends while I was there They did react very well however, and didn't attempt to hush me up or sweep it under the rug. They were very open about it and got busy working on getting the best people there to deal with it. We started out with wound nurses, but are now in the care of a plastic surgeon. We have one more week of healing before he decides if he has to do surgery to close it or not. I don't think he will because it does get a lot better each day -- we'll see.

Back to the SID issues---
Because of surgery and the type of surgery it was (involving the bladder and bowel) dd could not eat for a total of about 5 days. This concerned me and I was worried that she might decide that eating isn't all it's cracked up to be after all. Well, that is exactly what has happened :

Thank goodness for her g-tube, that's all I'm sayin'. She is back on formula for all her calories, but she has started eating more little by little each day. She's doing a lot of taking bites and chewing her food but then having to spit it out. She did this some before, but not as much as she is now. I figure it will be a process. DH is having trouble with this I think. He doesn't like her being on formula and he says he just wants her to be eating on her own -- Well, Duh! : Who doesn't? But that doesn't mean she's going to and we can't let her die of malnutrition just because it sucks that she's on formula.

They also did this blood test while she was in the hospital that checks to see her level of protein, which is supposed to be a window to her over-all nutrional status. Anyway, it's supposed to be 25 or higher and hers was 10 point something. They said that part of that was due to her not eating for so long with the surgery, but not all of it. We are supplementing her formula with protein powder now, especially due to the fact that she has to have high protein for wound healing.....and she just had surgery besides.

And since the kid doesn't drink much either we are now syringing in water through her g-tube. I actually feel better about where she is and is going to be nutritionally now. Before I just worried about it all the time and didn't know what to do. The nutritionists I saw always seemed not to really get it and since her weight is a bit high they either wanted to put her on a diet or would tell me she's fine.
Anyway, we now have a plan for when she does start eating totally on her won -- protein powder, vitamins, fiber supplement and additional water added to her usual foods (almost all carbs).

OK, there's my little update.
Glad to be back

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#135 of 241 Old 09-18-2006, 12:56 AM
 
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Oh Wow JudeJude -

Thanks for the update. I'm sorry to hear about the additional difficulties after the surgery. It sounds like you have her wound care in good hands, but it shouldn't have even been an issue. Hopefully you can avoid the plastic surgeon having to do anything. I have to laugh a little about you feeling better about her nutrition with the g tube. I have an on-line friend who had a 26 weeker preemie with a g tube and over the last year her now 3 year old has been starting to eat real food and got rid of the g tube. She laughs that it was just so much easier to toss the correct nutritional food or medicine into the g tube than to try to convince her 3 year old to eat some veggies. I'm sure you wish she didn't have to have it, but I can see how it might have some usefulness in ways other than the doctors intended.

Welcome back and I hope all goes smoothly from here on out. How are the bladder/bowel issues doing since the surgery?
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#136 of 241 Old 09-19-2006, 03:00 AM
 
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Oh Wow JudeJude -

Thanks for the update. I'm sorry to hear about the additional difficulties after the surgery. It sounds like you have her wound care in good hands, but it shouldn't have even been an issue. Hopefully you can avoid the plastic surgeon having to do anything. I have to laugh a little about you feeling better about her nutrition with the g tube. I have an on-line friend who had a 26 weeker preemie with a g tube and over the last year her now 3 year old has been starting to eat real food and got rid of the g tube. She laughs that it was just so much easier to toss the correct nutritional food or medicine into the g tube than to try to convince her 3 year old to eat some veggies. I'm sure you wish she didn't have to have it, but I can see how it might have some usefulness in ways other than the doctors intended.

Welcome back and I hope all goes smoothly from here on out. How are the bladder/bowel issues doing since the surgery?
Thanks chann96
It is true about the g-tube. In a lot of ways it is easier to just put whatever you want in there for your kid to have perfect nutrition. Trying to get them to eat is a lot more stressful, even though the formula feed is more work physically sometimes.

When dd first got the g-tube when she was 6 (and it was because she quit eating almost completely and was already underweight) I wanted her to continue to have speech therapy for her eating issues and for them to continue to work on it in OT too. The therapists acted like I was nuts because everyone acted like now since she had a g-tube our worries were over and she no longer had to eat! I thought they were all insane and her pediatrician was the only one who really got the importance of us working on her eating. I tried to explain to them that I make decisions for her based on her whole life and future and not based on just tomorrow. A kid who already doesn't like to eat (for real) and we're just going to sit and watch her never eat another bite? :
You gotta wonder about some people and how they think. I still really don't get where they were all coming from. I know there is a reason why they all had that thought process, I just don't have a clue what the hell it is. Even normal people (friends and family) kind of acted like our problems were all over and now she didn't have to eat. It's just strange.
I do agree that it would be very easy for a parent to get drawn into that way of thinking because it is very easy to hook them up to the pump or syringe in the perfect nutrition and feel like you've done what you need to. I personally would prefer my kid not graduate high school on a feeding pump if at all possible. It could still happen, but not because I didn't do anything to avoid it.

Oops, was that a tangent of sorts? Oops!

About her bladder and bowels (I guess this is OT for this thread)---
We have just started using the ACE and flushing her bowels with saline. She is going to be sitting on the toilet everyday now starting in the next few days.
How awful is this? I realized I hadn't done it today so I did it this evening but it was too late to put her on the toilet (you have to sit there for between 30 and 60 min.) so I flushed her ACE and figured I'd just have to clean her up if she pooped in her diaper. That made me feel like crap. Now I'm worried that it's going to be hard to stick to this putting her on the toilet everyday thing. They did say that some people when they get things regulated only have to do it every othere day --- god, I hope that's us.
DD is very excited about sitting on the toilet, but I am concerned that it is going to get old quick and it is going to be a battle to get her on there....and especially stay on there. Years ago they told me they could make a seating device for the toilet and then we could experiment with different stool softeners, etc. to get the right consistency so she could poop by herself on the toilet. They said there'd be a schedule and we'd have to really committ to it. Needless to say we never did it. She only rarely poops her pants now anyway, so it's not like she was in school with poopy diapers or anything, but still.

It's just one more thing.
Potentially she will not have to wear diapers diapers anymore and that is a huge deal. It's all part of growing up

The bladder thing is going well so far although I will be glad when we get rid of the SP tube (Super Pubic tube that is like a catheter accept it comes out of your lower abdomen instead of your urethra) and the leg bag that goes with it. I'm up in the middle of the night flushing her bladder with saline when it doesn't seem like things are draining properly - Oi ve! (I think that's how you spell that)

Sorry I went on and on, but thanks for asking even if you regret it now

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#137 of 241 Old 09-19-2006, 06:57 PM
 
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Hey no problem about going on about stuff. Number one I have never been known as succinct and number two I never know whether this procedure might be in our future so it's good for me to read about.

I understand your point about needing to help her to eat. I'm amazed about how short-sighted those folks were in thinking you didn't need to do that.

I cannot even imagine a day when Charlotte will be out of diapers. She, fortunately, goes on her own without too much intervention from us, but doesn't have enough sensation to tell she needs to go. We'll need to get on-board with a regular "bowel evacuation" (I just love that phrase) phrase at some point here. Right now I'm just working on getting her cathed on the toilet most of the time. She'd much rather just lay on the floor to do it.

Anyway I'm glad things are progressing. I'm sure once you get into the routine of sitting on the toilet it will become habit pretty quickly.
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#138 of 241 Old 09-20-2006, 02:38 AM
 
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Hey no problem about going on about stuff. Number one I have never been known as succinct and number two I never know whether this procedure might be in our future so it's good for me to read about.
Remind me of her diagnosis again? (does diagnosis cover singular and plural? anyway...)

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#139 of 241 Old 09-20-2006, 11:32 AM
 
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She has spina bifida (LF/S1), hydrocephalus, and asymptomatic AC type II. Oh and her apraxia. Her doctors so far seem to think that bowel and bladder-wise she shouldn't have a need for any surgery, but you never know.
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#140 of 241 Old 09-20-2006, 01:37 PM
 
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Hi...question for y'all. Eli's OT eval was finally done, and they recommend the weighted vest for part of his therapy (he needs extensive feeding therapies too, that's his main area of problems) and I'm wondering did any of you get one for home use? I find doing deep touch squeezes with him every day really helps him a lot and he really loves it, so I thought the weighted vest might really be great for him..what do you think?
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#141 of 241 Old 09-20-2006, 09:03 PM
 
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Before you invest in a weighted vest, you could try and get a backpack and weigh it down a bit. There are patterns out there (if you or someone you know is handy) to make weighted blankets (someone made Ian one that looks like a cat - really cute).

Just a few along-the-same-line ideas.
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#142 of 241 Old 09-21-2006, 02:43 AM
 
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Well, if you can get Insurance to pay for it, otherwise there are other things that would work like what honestmama mentioned. They can be very pricey, but people do also make them homemade or just use other stuff to get the same affect.

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#143 of 241 Old 09-21-2006, 02:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by chann96 View Post
She has spina bifida (LF/S1), hydrocephalus, and asymptomatic AC type II. Oh and her apraxia. Her doctors so far seem to think that bowel and bladder-wise she shouldn't have a need for any surgery, but you never know.
Good grief! I don't know how I forgot that when it is so similar to dd. Anyway, thanks for the reminder

Oh and what they said baout not needing bowel or bladder surgery, it is true that that can change over time, but in our case in can also change back. DD didn't have reflux (from bladder to kidneys) for years and then she had reflux for about 2 years and we finally had to put her on profolactic antibiotics. Then she didn't have it again and hasn't had it since -- go figure. They didn't act like it was weird for her to go back and forth.
Oh, and she did not need bladder augmentation surgery, or any of it for that matter. They did the mitroffanof by her choice so she could cath' herself and they just did the bladder augmentation since they were in there and figured she'd have it down the road anyway...maybe. I think they almost always do the bladder aug. with a mitroffanof. Also, we decided at the last minute to do the ACE because we figured we might end up doing that in a couple years anyway, so why not just get it all done at once. Now she gets to poop on the toilet and is all excited about it --- we start tomorrow for sure.

DD has always had a great shape to her bladder and the walls of the bladder have never thickened despite the fact that she has never been on Ditripan (sp?) due to an allergy.....and she has a way higher level than your dd (T8-T9), so I'd say it is entirely possible that your dd may never need any bowel or bladder surgery --- ya never know, but it is not a given. How old is she?

Sorry I guess this is kind of OT and more special needs in general and not realted to SID so much.

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#144 of 241 Old 09-21-2006, 08:59 AM
 
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I haven't read through all the posts yet but my ds was diagnosed with mild sensory processing disorders at the start of his first grade year. (9/05). I had done my research prior to this and was seeing behaviors that I thought were definitely SID related so the diagnosis came as a relief to me.

He received OT 2X a week through the entire school year and I saw much improvement. I also liked that I could bounce things off of his OT or she would offer suggestions for activities to work on at home. We moved over the summer and I've been working to get another OT evaluation at his new school. I'm contacting the Assistant Principal weekly to find out what is taking so long...they've been in school for 6.5 weeks now and he still hasn't been evaluated. I'm also being told that because he's high functioning, that he probably won't qualify for OT this year. I am prepared for that but am still pushing for the evaluation so they have documentation. (they also have the initial diagnosis, progress reports and final recommendation from his OT in which she recommended that he continue with OT for at least 1/2 of his second grade school year)

Needless to say, I have been reading Sensational Kids, I have the Out of Sync Child and The OoSC, Has Fun but have been looking for other info for ways to help him succeed at home.

I feel that I'm constantly having to stay on top of ds to help him be consistant with putting his backpack away, taking care of his lunch box, cleaning up his toys, etc. As for his backpack, he likes to toss it anywhere when he first walks in the door and then he frantically searches for it when he starts homework...meltdowns occur if it's not on the hook and I assist him in the search of his backpack.

Any tips or suggestions for helping him remember to stash it in the closet when he first walks in the door?

I have a list for his "daily jobs" (get dressed, eat breakfast, brush teeth, feed Braxton(dog), etc) and have given him his own alarm clock. He is more successful this year with getting ready for school and being on time so I know the list is helpful for him. I just need to figure out a way for him to be more consistent with his backpack so he's not frantically searching for it & I'm not constantly reminding him to put it away. Btw, he picked the spot for his backpack to go because it's the first place he stops to take off his shoes...I've even thought of posting a sign on the inside of the closet door that reads, "Remember to hang your backpack."
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#145 of 241 Old 09-22-2006, 12:55 AM
 
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Originally Posted by pjabslenz View Post
I feel that I'm constantly having to stay on top of ds to help him be consistant with putting his backpack away, taking care of his lunch box, cleaning up his toys, etc. As for his backpack, he likes to toss it anywhere when he first walks in the door and then he frantically searches for it when he starts homework...meltdowns occur if it's not on the hook and I assist him in the search of his backpack.

Any tips or suggestions for helping him remember to stash it in the closet when he first walks in the door?

I have a list for his "daily jobs" (get dressed, eat breakfast, brush teeth, feed Braxton(dog), etc) and have given him his own alarm clock. He is more successful this year with getting ready for school and being on time so I know the list is helpful for him. I just need to figure out a way for him to be more consistent with his backpack so he's not frantically searching for it & I'm not constantly reminding him to put it away. Btw, he picked the spot for his backpack to go because it's the first place he stops to take off his shoes...I've even thought of posting a sign on the inside of the closet door that reads, "Remember to hang your backpack."
Put a list by the door he comes in from school at. Have the first thing be "hang up back pack!" with a picture of a back pack. Then when he comes home you can remind him to go look at his list, instead of feeling like you're nagging about the back pack. You could even have him help make the list so he feels like he made the list and may want to take responsibility more.
You will always have to remind over and over, but if you can find a way to do it where they don't feel "nagged" (OK, I hate that word).

DD used to always forget to brish her teeth and I would forget to remind her so I printed out a picture of a tooth brush and wrote "remember to brush your teeth" next to it. We posted it inside the door at her eye level. It helped...even though we did have to stop at the door and brush her teeth more than once. I kept a tooth brush downstairs so I could get it quick if she got to the door and remembered that she hadn't brushed.

When DD was in school she had lists everywhere for everything, but then she needed an actual person to remind her to look at her list. Still, even with the reminding she felt in charge of looking at the list and carrying out whatever was on it, even if she did have to ask for help. These lists gave her control and made her feel grown up..... I have lists myself, after all

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#146 of 241 Old 09-24-2006, 11:27 PM
 
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Hi all.

My six year old DS has mild SPD. We go to OT and sensory group each week and use epsom salt baths a few times a week and have started Wheat Free (just about gluten free) and casein free diet last week. He's improving a lot -- even kicked the ball in soccer today! I have an appt. with a developmental ped. for November and am looking to start Vision Therapy next month.

I am wondering if anyone has had a good experience with Vision Therapy or chiropractic.

I also would love to know some more foods to get him to try. Presently, he is living on rice pasta, homemade chicken nuggets coated in potato chips, potato chips, fruit leather, bananas and GF/CS pizza. He likes crunchy and smooth textures.

Also, I have a three month old who cries ALOT. He startles really easily and seems to be very gassy. Could he already be SPD? Any other ideas for him -- and what can I do to help? I'm already wheat-free, dairy-free, use a sling and have tried every gas drop in exisitence.

Thanks for your advice!

- paula
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#147 of 241 Old 09-24-2006, 11:43 PM
 
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Ok, joining back in. I hope that that is ok. We have just been majorly busy adjusting to a new schedule that I haven't had time to keep up. Bad me, I know. So...how is everyone doing?
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#148 of 241 Old 09-25-2006, 05:14 PM
 
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thanks for the advice y'all. I found a website with a blanket pattern and I've posted to my autism support group locally and found some folks with outgrown vests they were willing to give up for me. The OT today said that she used a weighted lap blanket with him today and it worked really well, so I'm lookign forward to trying a vest..meanwhile, he wanted to wear a jacket today so I put bean bags in the pockets..he's very calm today.
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#149 of 241 Old 09-25-2006, 10:32 PM
 
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How early can you dx SPD?

Who would do an early dx?

-paula
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#150 of 241 Old 09-25-2006, 10:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Richie'sMama View Post
How early can you dx SPD?

Who would do an early dx?

-paula
I am not sure but I noticed little things with both my kids before they turned 12 months.
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