Difference between a highly-sensitive quirky kid and one with Asperger's? - Mothering Forums

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Old 12-07-2006, 11:31 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I am really confused about this. Every day I go back and forth between, he's okay, no he's not, yes he is, no he's not. We have a Child Find appointment on January 8 (our son is 3 1/2).

Until he started preschool we thought he was fine, just a "high needs" kid. His teacher said he never plays with other kids. We have seen him play with others, at playgroups, parties, etc., but he does prefer to play alone. She was also concerned with his articulation so we decided to set up the appointment.

The weird part is, sometimes he is perfectly fine. For example, we went to a birthday party the other day at a bowling alley and he just wilted, clinging to us and not participating. He said it was "too loud." He talked like a baby (he does that a lot since his sister was born) but then we got in the car to leave and he was like, "Daddy, I would like to go get our Christmas tree" clear as a bell.

Other concerns: Poor eye contact since birth, although it is better now
Will show affection but only on his own terms
Preference for sameness--gets very upset if we drive the wrong way around our parking lot when leaving
Fixates on things (Sesame St. figurines one day, Care Bear figurines the next, tiny rubber bugs the next)--has to take them everywhere, freaks out if he can't find one

He has a huge vocabulary and says things like, "Actually, you can sing that song either way" or "You absolutely cannot touch my toys" (to dd). He is very interested in letters, numbers, etc. (knew all upper and lowercase letters, numbers 1-9, all shapes including hexagon, all colors including gray, brown, etc. by 20 MONTHS!).

He is very sensitive. If we think he is not upset about something (like us getting excited when dd walked for the first time) then we are wrong. Later on his stress will show up in another form (he will fall down while walking and cry, "I fell. I can't walk very good. Kiss my boo boo" followed by an all out crying session).

So could he just be "high needs" and super sensitive, and just a loner, or do these things together usually indicate Asperger's? In the "old days" before early intervention would he just have been considered a "spoiled kid" (of course I don't think he's spoiled but I can see how to a non APer it would appear that way) or "stubborn" or "sensitive"?
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Old 12-08-2006, 01:07 AM
 
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I think it you are right that it is a fine line and really hard to tell especially when kids are younger. Does he routinely have problems with noise or other sensations? Some kids with sensory challenges can look like they have Asperger's when they don't.

A couple of books that might be worth looking at:

http://www.amazon.com/Quirky-Kids-Un.../dp/0345451430

http://www.amazon.com/Misdiagnosis-D...e=UTF8&s=books
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Old 12-08-2006, 01:14 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I think it you are right that it is a fine line and really hard to tell especially when kids are younger. Does he routinely have problems with noise or other sensations? Some kids with sensory challenges can look like they have Asperger's when they don't.

A couple of books that might be worth looking at:

http://www.amazon.com/Quirky-Kids-Un.../dp/0345451430

http://www.amazon.com/Misdiagnosis-D...e=UTF8&s=books

I don't know about the sensory stuff. We are just starting to notice whether he does better with other kids in a less stimulating environment (someone's house as opposed to a bowling alley--which I guess would be a version of hell for someone with sensory issues!).

The book about gifted children looks interesting. I often wonder if he is "gifted" but being a former teacher I am aware that many parents think their kids are gifted when they are really just bright. But I have always felt there was something really different about ds and the way his mind worked from the very beginning.

I had forgotten that gifted children can often be very sensitive and particular about things being a certain way. Not that you can't be gifted AND have Asperger's but it is definitely another factor to consider.
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Old 12-08-2006, 05:07 AM
 
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Sounds like sensory stuff to me. Our kindergartner presented very much like Asperger's until we began O.T. for sensory integration. Now he is doing great in school, though we still see some old behaviors when he gets over-stimulated and he lets down his guard at home. It depends what his sensory issues are as to whether a bowling alley would be more or less stimulating than someone's house.

He does sound very bright, maybe he is gifted. It is not uncommon for gifted children to have sensory sensitivities. Check out www.visualspatial.org which is about gifted kids who have a different way of learning. Good books on SID The Out of Sync Child and The Sensory Sensitive Child, if you haven't already.
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Old 12-08-2006, 02:00 PM
 
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my ds, 4, sounds very much like your son. We have had a neurodevelopmental ped say he has Asperger's but i didn't feel it was a very thorough exam (15 minutes and no diagnostic scales just a conversation) and will get a 2nd opinion. From what i've read Intellectually Gifted and even Sensory Processing Disorder can present in the same way. one of the big red flags for Asperger's is not being able to interpret facial expressions, body language, and social cues correctly. I am not sure if that is something that can easily be tested at this age but its something to look for as he gets older.

also a great book is Mislabeled Child by Brock and Jeanette Eide, really goes into how kids think and learn and several diagnoses that can be incorrectly applied. apparently Asperger's is a hot diagnosis right now
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Old 12-08-2006, 02:17 PM
 
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Asperger's is rarely diagnosed so early.
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Old 12-08-2006, 03:51 PM
 
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Asperger's is rarely diagnosed so early.
:
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Old 12-08-2006, 04:40 PM
 
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Just wanted to say that the book Quirky Kids that was recommended is a GREAT book. We are reading it right now, my daughter is 5 and sounds a lot like your little boy did at that age. You should get this and read it!!

Blessings,

Denise
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Old 12-08-2006, 07:34 PM
 
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While they won't assess for aspergers until 5-6 generally, they can assess for autism spectrum at his age--it is just that the diagnosis (if there is one) would be Pervasive Development Disorder--Not Otherwise Specified until he was old enough to be dx with aspergers. Yes, I see aspergers in what you wrote (though my opinion only and I see that some would disagree) but I'd think about what it would change in thinking about assessment. Would you do anything differently? I decided yes in answer to that question for my son so I had him assessed.

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Old 12-08-2006, 10:47 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Would you do anything differently? I decided yes in answer to that question for my son so I had him assessed.
I don't know. I don't know enough to make that decision. Asperger's is really confusing to me. I have done the online PDD assessment scale on him twice, once in August and once yesterday. I got a 49 and a 48 (no PDD). 50 is mild PDD. So you can see my confusion! There is so much emphasis on EI, I didn't know that with Asperger's sometimes you just have to wait?

So, what did you do differently as a result of his assessment?
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Old 12-08-2006, 11:24 PM
 
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Another book to check out is Raising Your Spirited Child

I used to wonder about my quirky oldest - he had some sensory things (he was the neatest baby, hated to get dirty ), liked routines, was really too smart for his own good...my mil was certain (and still is) that he had Asperger's, but my ds was social - on his terms. I think we have to be careful as a society, not every kid is an extrovert. It seems that if you're a bit of an introvert, you're suddenly classified as having something wrong with you...when there isn't anything wrong.

Anyway, this book totally pinpointed my son - to the point he could have been the kid in the examples!
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Old 12-08-2006, 11:57 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I used to wonder about my quirky oldest - he had some sensory things (he was the neatest baby, hated to get dirty ), liked routines, was really too smart for his own good...my mil was certain (and still is) that he had Asperger's, but my ds was social - on his terms. I think we have to be careful as a society, not every kid is an extrovert. It seems that if you're a bit of an introvert, you're suddenly classified as having something wrong with you...when there isn't anything wrong.
Interesting about the neatness thing. That is definitely my ds, and me! I remember last summer we went to dh's baseball game and our friends were there with their 3-year-old. The boys played and by the end of the game the other child was covered from head to toe in dirt. Ds was nearly spotless and we had no idea how he had managed to stay clean despite being surrounded by dirt. His teachers say he washes his hands all the time. He gets very upset if there is the tiniest bit of paint or glue on his hands.
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Old 12-09-2006, 12:41 AM
 
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An assessment can be useful if it gets your child the services they need. Occupational therapy can be helpful for sensory issues.
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Old 12-09-2006, 04:10 AM
 
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I wonder about my kid too (known SID and regulatory disorder, troubled also by serious hyperactivity. Has needed OT and ST and is just tested totally NORMAL for articulation!).

Anyway, besides the books already mentioned, try
http://www.amazon.com/Kids-Syndrome-...e=UTF8&s=books

plus one of these Aspergers refernces
http://www.amazon.com/Parents-Asperg...e=UTF8&s=books
http://www.amazon.com/OASIS-Guide-As...369224-4080027

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Old 12-09-2006, 12:49 PM
 
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All of the above recommended books are good. If you want to add another to your list, "The Hidden Gifts of the Introverted Child: Helping Your Child Thrive in an Extroverted World."

http://www.amazon.com/Hidden-Gifts-I...e=UTF8&s=books

I just ordered it because my mom read it and said that I needed to get it to understand my ds better. He has a lot of the same traits that your ds does, has sensory issues, and has just been diagnosed with ADHD tendencies (inattention and impulsivity) and anxiety driven tendencies. Not even close to being on the autistic spectrum even with big red flags such as toe walking and intermittent eye contact issues.

It is appearing to me like Asperger's, Dyslexia, ADHD and Giftedness share a lot of the same behavior characteristics. I think the Quirky book sounds good, too. It's very easy to pathogolize unique personality and behavior characteristics that might not be typical, but are still normal.

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

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Old 12-10-2006, 12:33 AM
 
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I have also ooften wondered about my ds and Asperger's, as well. At a young age (before 3 years old), he exhibited the following traits which concerned me:
- amazing verbatim memory of paragraphs of text
- memorized lots of stuff, like all the states on the US map'
- highly sensitive to auditory and visual stimuli
- many obsessive fears (including his own death and mine, at a super young age)
- was able to relate to adults but not to children/ played alone or followed teachers around at preschool
- showed little or no affection, no desire to please
- sometimes displayed blatantly anti-social behaviors, such as "shooting" at other kids
At around 4.5 years old, he developed full-blown ocd at which point we did undergo a complete neuro-psych eval at the suggestion of his therapist (who thought he might be gifted, and struggling in part due to discrepancies in his abilities). Not a word of the autistic spectrum was mentioned as a result of that evaluation! So, yes, many traits can be present without the autism. It is so hard to understand!
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Old 12-10-2006, 01:32 AM - Thread Starter
 
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- memorized lots of stuff, like all the states on the US map'
Not that this is necessarily related to possibly being on the spectrum, but my ds also seems to have a "photographic" memory. He has a Leap Frog alphabet stuffed frog with all 26 letters on the front. The letters are in a variety of colors and one day he started telling me all the colors of the letters--without looking at the frog. I was amazed and asked him each letter, not in order, and he told me its color without hesitating. This was obviously not something we had worked on--who would??? Also when he does a jigsaw puzzle he doesn't necessarily fit the pieces together right away--he will just pick up each piece and place it in the middle of the puzzle by itself, in the exact right spot. Weird kid
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Old 12-10-2006, 05:46 AM
 
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I've just got to say it again. Please check out www.visualspatial.org. I ordered the book from that site called Upside Down Brilliance: The Visual Spatial Learner. Your last post sounds so much like the gifted visual-spatial learners they described. There are many abilities and traits that are associated with the right side of the brain (the visual-spatial side). A child who has a very dominant right hemisphere might display everything that you are asking about, particularly if they are gifted. But there can also be learning disabilities at the same time. Dyslexia is a good example of this. A child who has trouble with reading could be a genius with higher math or physics.

Another thought regarding diagnosis is that you can usually get O.T. with just a diagnosis of SID. In fact, it hasn't made a difference with our insurance company what diagnosis we have - they either cover some things or they don't. The schools, however, may not pick up a child for services unless they have either a large enough discrepancy between ability and performance, or they have a medical diagnosis. Districts may vary as to whether or not they accept SID as a medical diagnosis. We are waiting on getting a diagnosis because so far, our son is doing fine at school and we are getting the services he needs privately through insurance. If he needs services at school next year in 1st grade, we would probably get a diagnosis then. At some point you can have your child tested as gifted - and maybe that is the special input your child needs to develop his giftedness.
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Old 12-10-2006, 10:06 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I've just got to say it again. Please check out www.visualspatial.org.
Thank you -- I am going to order Upside-Down Brilliance. There are so many books here for me to check out and I have cut and pasted them all into a Word list. I'll read this one first because not only does it possibly sound like my son, there is no doubt that it is my nephew (dx HFA, possibly being changed to Asperger's). It will help my sister immensely I think.

I will keep the Child Find appointment, and start reading. I'll let you guys know how it goes! I truly appreciate all the input. I can't believe how educated and thoughtful everyone is here on MDC. This place is truly a bottomless well of information on all things related to parenting, and more
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Old 12-10-2006, 10:12 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Just wanted to add--one more way that my "mother's instinct" tells me there is something not typical about him: Dd is sitting next to me right now spinning the wheels on a toy car. I am not even remotely concerned about this because she is the epitome of a typical kid and has been since birth. Every time ds did something like that even at this young age I would get a sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach. Dd is very "there," as in, her awareness of the world around her is right at the surface and you can immediately "reach" her every time you speak to her or touch her. She is very in sync with her world.

If you have both a typical and a non-typical (?) kid I'm sure you understand this difference that I am talking about.
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Old 12-10-2006, 12:47 PM
 
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Also when he does a jigsaw puzzle he doesn't necessarily fit the pieces together right away--he will just pick up each piece and place it in the middle of the puzzle by itself, in the exact right spot. Weird kid
This is my ds! When I do a puzzle, I look for the outside edges and large areas of the pictures that I can "see" go together and fill in the rest. Not ds. He picks up one piece of a 200+ puzzle, looks around on the floor and quickly picks up another piece that fits with the first. He never used to look at the box, but once I showed him how he could use looking at the whole picture he could even go faster, but he still doesn't use it much. It's really quite amazing, and not at all how I would attack a puzzle.

This VS ability even translates to other things -- for example, ds spent time looking at the whole calendar - numbered days, days of the weeks, weeks, months, and the seasons. In a very short time, he understood the concept of the whole year. He needs the WHOLE picture to understand the individual parts. I attribute this preference to his frustration levels as a toddler. If he could understand EVERYTHING (like we need to put our clothes on before we leave the house, and we're leaving the house to go to the park, etc.) he was much happier about the whole transition process. If I tried to hurry this process up, it could be a disaster! It wasn't that he didn't like transitions or change, he just needed to know what was going to happen. If you think about it from an adult perspective, adults like to know what's happening and what the game plan is, too! You don't just hop into the car and go "Now what?"

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Old 12-10-2006, 01:23 PM
 
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He has a huge vocabulary and says things like, "Actually, you can sing that song either way" or "You absolutely cannot touch my toys" (to dd). He is very interested in letters, numbers, etc. (knew all upper and lowercase letters, numbers 1-9, all shapes including hexagon, all colors including gray, brown, etc. by 20 MONTHS!).
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The book about gifted children looks interesting. I often wonder if he is "gifted" but being a former teacher I am aware that many parents think their kids are gifted when they are really just bright.
I can't imagine a kid knowing all their letters, shapes, colors and numbers by 20 months and not be gifted. To me the question would be not is he gifted, but how gifted and what implications will that have for his education. That is something important to consider and don't count on the Child Find folks to bring it up. You may also want to take a look at the Deborah Ruf book http://www.amazon.com/Losing-Our-Min.../dp/0910707707

Gifted kids can be really asychronous with some areas of development going much faster than others. This can be difficult and it can look like other problems. As you said you notice something is different or atypical. Remember one possible thing you could be noticing is an intellectual difference.
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Old 12-10-2006, 01:58 PM
 
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My ds has SPD/SID and some people think he has Asperger's bt I don't know.

He dislikes the company of most people, is sensitive to touch, prefers to play alone, prefers to be so close to me that he'd have to get physically back inside to get any closer! He is very sound sensitive, hates white noise type sounds, can't deal with anywhere crowded. He used to scream for hours as a baby and couldn't even deal with inside noises (that buzzing you hear when the house is "quiet"). But he's also wicked bright. At about 6 months he made a catapult out of spoons at a restarant, scaring my mother silly. He watches things intently till he has them entirely figured out. He loves to watch Magic School Bus videos and then tell me all about what he learned. Last year he was obsessed with the function of the digestive tract. He has a hard time remembering what he was asked to do, but won't let you forget which way we usually walk to the store(we let him give the directions when we walk now). I can see him doing the thing with puzzle pieces. I was like that too, actually. He has severe speech delay and people often think he's speaking another language. (His pediatrician asked me what language he was speaking!!)

I've read some books on SPD that I borrowed from a counselor and I can't remember the names. I think these kids are often more gifted in the intelligence than they are in real-world functioning. (Like Einstein?)

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Old 12-10-2006, 02:19 PM
 
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All of the above recommended books are good. If you want to add another to your list, "The Hidden Gifts of the Introverted Child: Helping Your Child Thrive in an Extroverted World."

http://www.amazon.com/Hidden-Gifts-I...e=UTF8&s=books

I just ordered it because my mom read it and said that I needed to get it to understand my ds better. He has a lot of the same traits that your ds does, has sensory issues, and has just been diagnosed with ADHD tendencies (inattention and impulsivity) and anxiety driven tendencies. Not even close to being on the autistic spectrum even with big red flags such as toe walking and intermittent eye contact issues.

It is appearing to me like Asperger's, Dyslexia, ADHD and Giftedness share a lot of the same behavior characteristics. I think the Quirky book sounds good, too. It's very easy to pathogolize unique personality and behavior characteristics that might not be typical, but are still normal.
Thanks for posting about that book. I was at Barnes and Noble last night and started flipping through it (and countless others) - for a while now, I've worried that my mil's thoughts of ds having Asperger's was true. Despite me talking it over with teachers and doctors and moms of kids with Asperger's. I've really felt that my poor ds was an intervert in a family of extroverts, some of them are super-extroverts if there is such a thing After reading parts of this book, I feel more secure about ds and how he does not have Asperger's. I guess I've been dealing with the "If someone keeps mentioning it long enough, you begin to doubt your instincts" syndrome.
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Old 12-10-2006, 02:30 PM
 
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I can't imagine a kid knowing all their letters, shapes, colors and numbers by 20 months and not be gifted.
There are a number of kids who have something called "Hyperlexia" where this is one of the hallmarks of the difference. It is actually a speech and language disorder which can stand on it's own but it is also common amung ASD kids. Hyperlexia is the precocious ability to read without being taught. They know thier letters by 2 and read by 5 (many by 3 or 4). However, they have problems with comprehension, social language etc.

Yes I do agree they are gifted in an area and many are gifted over all but often (particularly for those with ASD) they have extreme differences from one area to another area beyond the typical asynchronus delevelopment of gifted children. These kids can be considered "twice exceptional" where htey are gifted and yet disabled as well. It is extremely common for kids with ASD to have a asynchronus profile of abilities and deficits being extremely gifted in some areas and extremely delayed in others. Both of my ASD kids are "twice exceptional" in this way. My 10yo ds's last IQ test a couple months ago had composite scores ranging from 139 to 72.

The trick is using thier gifts to support thier delays. Fortunately with hyperlexic kids this is a pretty easy thing to do and they often have a good outcome/prognosis.

My dd knew all her letters and numbers by this age but we didn't know it until she shared at 2 because she didn't converse with us at all. We caught her labelling a bunch of letters. Though she could read all her letters she couldn't follow simple directions, hold a simple conversation, make requests and often didnt answer to her name. She is now considered as having a 119 IQ, is fully included with an aide and support and gets mostly good grades (with that support). She has done wonderfully but she is still ASD.
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Old 12-10-2006, 02:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by rbear4 View Post
There are a number of kids who have something called "Hyperlexia" where this is one of the hallmarks of the difference. It is actually a speech and language disorder which can stand on it's own but it is also common amung ASD kids. Hyperlexia is the precocious ability to read without being taught. They know thier letters by 2 and read by 5 (many by 3 or 4). However, they have problems with comprehension, social language etc.
I'm very familiar with hyperlexia as it was suggested as a diagnosis for our son by at least three different professionals. Unfortunately none of these professionals were aware or acknowledged for us that early precocious, self taught reading can also result from a child being intellectually gifted. This is very common among highly and profoundly gifted kids who don't have disabilities. Our experience is that folks are trained to look for deficits not for strengths and may label something as a pathology when it isn't. Our child had other symptoms such as difficulties with social language, difficulties reading nonverbals, sensory problems, motor coordination problems and social awkwardness and ultimately he received an ASD diagnosis. However, it was incorrect to suggest that his early reading was a sign of a deficit - it was the opposite in his case. It was a sign of intellectual strengths that turned out to be vital in helping him. It would have been tragic if it had been mislabled or ignored and the only reason that didn't happen is because we didn't agree with what we were being told.

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Originally Posted by rbear4 View Post
Yes I do agree they are gifted in an area and many are gifted over all but often (particularly for those with ASD) they have extreme differences from one area to another area beyond the typical asynchronus delevelopment of gifted children. These kids can be considered "twice exceptional" where htey are gifted and yet disabled as well. It is extremely common for kids with ASD to have a asynchronus profile of abilities and deficits being extremely gifted in some areas and extremely delayed in others. Both of my ASD kids are "twice exceptional" in this way. My 10yo ds's last IQ test a couple months ago had composite scores ranging from 139 to 72.
Right, that's why I suggested the book I suggested. It is about mis and dual diagnosis. The child being described clearly indicates strong early abilities in a number of areas and I don't get anything from the mother's post to suggest that this early knowledge is a sign there is something wrong with the child or that he's having problems with comprehension.
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Old 12-10-2006, 04:24 PM
 
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After reading parts of this book, I feel more secure about ds and how he does not have Asperger's. I guess I've been dealing with the "If someone keeps mentioning it long enough, you begin to doubt your instincts" syndrome.
Oh yeah -- BTDT! It is only in the school setting that ds has problems. More kids, more noise, more expectations of quick compliance, etc. And it was always the school that suggested autism (ds went to PS dev. pre-K for speech, second year was in a typical, small (8 children), home preschool where he thrived, and now we are back at PS Kindergarten). Even thought I did due dilegence on consulting a neurologist about his toe walking (dr. said no way autism), and ds' pediatrician (said to stop asking about autism or I would make ds neurotic) I still had that wondering going on in the back of my mind because the school kept bringing it up. I kept looking and looking for problems that frankly, I lost sight of the wonderful little boy who was very smart, great in low key environments, and had some "personality" - as his pediatrician described. Quirky ds definitely is. And he definitely has some social anxiety which is probably a hangover from his speech delay and now articulation issues. I wish I had listened a long time ago to his private speech therapist who told me that there is nothing wrong with a child who has the ability play with other kids, but does so on his own terms when he is ready.

I definitely feel that my anxiety over ds' situation has fueled his own insecurities and anxiety. At many points in this journey I would have gladly accepted an appropriate label just to have some answers. Along the way, I stopped listening to my intuition and heart. I started believing people who didn't know my ds very well at all and were looking for labels to define him to make it easier on them, not my ds.

I find it interesting that so many people are posting about "gray area kids" -- is it because we don't know the questions to ask to find our answers or is it because there are no answers yet?

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

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Old 12-10-2006, 06:12 PM
 
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Oh yeah -- BTDT! It is only in the school setting that ds has problems. More kids, more noise, more expectations of quick compliance, etc.
See, we're different. Ds does his absolute best in a highly-structured, traditional classroom. Blech! He completely fell apart in preschool because of all the "free play." That's basically because he doesn't play. But when his classmates' desks and his are in rows and there's a list on the board of work to complete, this is heaven for him. Nothing unexpected really happens, each day is the same as the one before...he takes such comfort in the monotony. This is particuarly funny because I am a public school teacher, but I shake it up in my classroom. Tons of group research projects, presentations, etc. Less traditional. Ds wouldn' thrive in my classroom at all! At home we are structured and organized (many people think I'm a little obsessive, too ), but on some Saturdays we go to the park, and other Saturdays a museum...at school, it's always Art on Thursdays.
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Old 12-10-2006, 11:52 PM
 
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See, we're different. Ds does his absolute best in a highly-structured, traditional classroom. Blech! He completely fell apart in preschool because of all the "free play." That's basically because he doesn't play. But when his classmates' desks and his are in rows and there's a list on the board of work to complete, this is heaven for him. Nothing unexpected really happens, each day is the same as the one before...he takes such comfort in the monotony. This is particuarly funny because I am a public school teacher, but I shake it up in my classroom. Tons of group research projects, presentations, etc. Less traditional. Ds wouldn' thrive in my classroom at all! At home we are structured and organized (many people think I'm a little obsessive, too ), but on some Saturdays we go to the park, and other Saturdays a museum...at school, it's always Art on Thursdays.
Actually, not so different. Ds' am kindergarten is academic with structure - he does very well there. Then from about 11:15 until 1 pm he breaks for lunch and recess -- this is chaos for him (many times he brings home almost a full lunch box, so I know that he's eaten very little ). His pm kindergarten class is enrichment, so it's social - group games, group projects, group everything, and it's very loud. By the end of the day he's a sensory overload nightmare. He is getting much better with it, but if he had his choice, he'd only go in the am - he's told me as much.

I think his ideal environment would be Montessori like (student led learning with teacher guides)- and as a matter of fact when we move (our home is on the market), I'm going to look into a Montessori school for him.

BTW teachma, if I could be a kid in your class I bet I would have a blast

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

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Old 12-10-2006, 11:57 PM - Thread Starter
 
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See, we're different. Ds does his absolute best in a highly-structured, traditional classroom. Blech! He completely fell apart in preschool because of all the "free play."
I'm going to respond more to other parts of this thread when I can get my thoughts together, but I wanted to say that my ds hates free play too. He sits alone and plays. I recently looked at another preschool that has structured centers where a certain number of kids can sign in at one table, sit down and lace cards, play with tangrams, etc. He would love this! We are hoping for a spot to open up this year; if not he'll start there in September.

teachma--I used to teach too. I had "controlled chaos" as my mentor liked to call it (she taught me to teach that way) with centers, projects, etc. going on all around. It would have been a nightmare for my ds too!
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