Melatonin Dosage - Mothering Forums

Melatonin Dosage

bodhicitta3's Avatar bodhicitta3 (TS)
07:36 PM Liked: 13
#1 of 12
12-21-2007 | Posts: 392
Joined: Jun 2006
Is there a chart to follow for dsoing? Anyone have any guidelines?
sbgrace's Avatar sbgrace
09:08 PM Liked: 46
#2 of 12
12-21-2007 | Posts: 9,143
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.25 mg is plenty for my son (28 pounds). His twin I've occasionally used it. For him I've used even less at times (like 1/4 of .25 mg.) and he's almost 35 pounds. You don't need much. And in general the less you use the less likely you are (I think) to have rebound waking as it wears off.
So play around and find the lowest dose that works.
Authentic_Mother's Avatar Authentic_Mother
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#3 of 12
12-22-2007 | Posts: 1,489
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I tried to buy some for DD and they refused to sell it to me for a child because it "prevents the brain from producing seratonin.
Anyone know about that or have any sites they can offer that explain the usage in children?
bdavis337's Avatar bdavis337
01:46 AM Liked: 12
#4 of 12
12-22-2007 | Posts: 5,976
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Just don't tell them who you're buying it for (which means not asking about child's doses).

I got sublingual (under the tongue) tablets at a local health food store. They're 1 mg tablets, so I split them in half and then crush that up into a powder and I give him just about half of what i've crushed up, so he's getting roughly .25mg. He weighs 35 lbs. Give it at 7, he's asleep by 8 and awake between 6 and 7am. I haven't given it the last few nights and we haven't needed it (woooo!). I was giving more than that at first, about 1/2mg or more, and he was waking at 5am or before. The lower dosage definitely works more appropriately.
Nature's Avatar Nature
02:12 AM Liked: 754
#5 of 12
12-22-2007 | Posts: 5,964
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Yikes. Ya... Ivy was on way too high of a dosage. (though she was a tall girl weighing 45 pounds at age 3) I tried starting off really small but it has no effect on her whatsoever. Gradually kept trying more and more until finally it worked like a charm. Unfortunately that was at 3 mg's and that seemed far too high for me so we discontinued with it.
sesa70's Avatar sesa70
02:37 AM Liked: 22
#6 of 12
12-22-2007 | Posts: 1,149
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Celeste has been taking melatonin for years. She had such struggles with sleep before! She is 8 now and weighs about 55-57 lbs. She takes between 1mg and 1.5mg. When we started her on it at about age 3 we did half a mg.
Authentic_Mother's Avatar Authentic_Mother
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#7 of 12
12-22-2007 | Posts: 1,489
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But is there any credence to her claim that it makes teh brain stop producing seratonin? I dont want to make her sleep only to have a moody and depressed child on my hands on top of everything else!
MindfulBirth's Avatar MindfulBirth
03:07 PM Liked: 1
#8 of 12
12-22-2007 | Posts: 1,317
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Authentic_Mother View Post
But is there any credence to her claim that it makes the brain stop producing seratonin? I dont want to make her sleep only to have a moody and depressed child on my hands on top of everything else!
Yes, it can effect the body's production of melatonin. If you child is old enough to take 5HTP instead...that is tryptophan - which causes the body to make its own melatonin.

Best to use as little melatonin as possible, as was previously suggested, and to not use it nightly. It is not so much that she will wake up moody and depressed - as it will stop having the effect you want over time - and if you stop giving it after a long period of giving it, the body will have forgotten to make its own.

However, if your child has epilepsy, their body might not be making enough its own melatonin. My daughter has constant subclinical seizures all night long and we use 2mg of melatonin each night for her to help reduce seizures.
There is research out there you can Google regarding epilepsy and melatonin.

All the best.
WuWei's Avatar WuWei
03:24 PM Liked: 28
#9 of 12
12-22-2007 | Posts: 11,071
Joined: Oct 2005
I just wanted to mention that long term use of melatonin in children doesn't have much research. Melatonin does affect other hormones and biochemical reactions in the brain. Daily use is considered only under medical direction, although it is a "natural product". We have used it a dozen times or so. Mostly to get back to sleep if we have a hugely busy day ahead, and ds awakens at 2am, unable to resettle. Our experience giving it at bedtime was that it helped him *get* to sleep, but not keep him asleep. Apparently, some children diagnosed with ADHD and autism do not produce adequate amounts and need supplementation routinely, generally in much larger doses than over-the-counter recommendations.

Getting physical activity in bright sunlight; and then turning the lights down early in the evening has helped regulate his sleep naturally also, it seems. Eliminating wheat and dairy helped the most. (oh, and the Feingold diet).

Melatonin usage, from Medline:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/d...melatonin.html

Melatonin usage, from Merck Manual: https://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec02/ch019/ch019o.html

Melatonin usage, from Mayo Clinic: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mel...ient-melatonin

Nutritional Melatonin, from Autism Canada Foundation: http://www.autismcanada.org/melatonin.htm

Melatonin and Children, from Medscape: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/448467

Systematic review of melatonin treatment in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities and sleep impairment: http://journals.cambridge.org/downlo...840b894cced959
Results of this systematic review suggest that melatonin may be effective in reducing sleep latency in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. There is also a suggestion that the more severe the sleep disorder the more obvious the improvement. There is no evidence suggesting any benefit in total sleep time or on night-time awakenings. However, caution
is required in interpreting the findings of all three included studies because the total number of participants is very small and consequently they may be underpowered. In addition, the overall quality of evidence from the studies is limited.


Melatonin usage in Children, link with many studies: http://www.worldhealth.net/p/4187,4473.html

(Basically, there may be some benefit, but only very limited research has been done on children, over very short durations.)


Pat
MindfulBirth's Avatar MindfulBirth
01:41 AM Liked: 1
#10 of 12
12-23-2007 | Posts: 1,317
Joined: Mar 2005
Oh...another caution is that in some kids it can produce nightmares. Yikes!

And of course you can always buy it online if your local Vitamin Shoppe gives you a hard time. Vitamin Warehouse dot com usually has good prices if you are buying other vitamins, too.
Authentic_Mother's Avatar Authentic_Mother
12:17 AM Liked: 0
#11 of 12
12-24-2007 | Posts: 1,489
Joined: Feb 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by MindfulBirth View Post
Yes, it can effect the body's production of melatonin. If you child is old enough to take 5HTP instead...that is tryptophan - which causes the body to make its own melatonin.

Best to use as little melatonin as possible, as was previously suggested, and to not use it nightly. It is not so much that she will wake up moody and depressed - as it will stop having the effect you want over time - and if you stop giving it after a long period of giving it, the body will have forgotten to make its own.

However, if your child has epilepsy, their body might not be making enough its own melatonin. My daughter has constant subclinical seizures all night long and we use 2mg of melatonin each night for her to help reduce seizures.
There is research out there you can Google regarding epilepsy and melatonin.

All the best.
How old is old enough to take 5htp? Thanks!
WuWei's Avatar WuWei
12:26 AM Liked: 28
#12 of 12
12-24-2007 | Posts: 11,071
Joined: Oct 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Authentic_Mother View Post
How old is old enough to take 5htp? Thanks!
I am not comfortable taking this as an adult without a professional naturopath's involvement. It alters seratonin, a neruotransmitter. I would not give it to a child. I have not done much investigation about it due to my concerns, however.


Pat
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