Hearing test for two year old - Mothering Forums

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Old 12-24-2007, 11:27 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My son has been having trouble talking and I have him enrolled in ECI. I recently had a hearing test done by a local doctor that specializes in hearing. He checked his ears with the thing that they stick in there with the light. He said there were a couple of drops of fluid in one ear but nothing to worry about. Then they did the hearing test which consisted of them putting him in a sound proof booth while we held him and a lady talked to him with the sound turned really low. She first asked him to point to his nose which he doesn't know that yet and did not respond. Then she asked where is my voice and asked some other things. To me he just looked around and did not really look like he responded at all. She claimed he looked at the speakers but I did not see it. The doctor said that I should wait six months and if there still is not any progress to contact them and then we can go to Texas childrens hospital and get a more accurate test. His words keep changing even words he knows well he keeps changing how he pronounces them. Instead of getting better they are getting worse. Like Keys for example he knew that word really well now he says something like "kelock" but he may be combining the words key and lock I am not sure. He had lost some words early on or so I thought but now I am realizing that he pronounces them so differently then from before that I did not recognize the words. Do you think that hearing test was very accurate or should I go have another one? Thanks
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Old 12-24-2007, 11:45 PM
 
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My ds got a hearing test at 20 mos and I don't think it was entirely effective. Kinda hard to test hearing on a kid who ignores or tunes out.

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Old 12-25-2007, 02:01 AM
 
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That is an inappropriate hearing test. My audiologist plays "pure sounds" from the left or right, if the child looks around they have a little dancing dog to reward them. Then the child understand the game and the get rewarded for hearing. They start using this at 9 months! By the time my DD was 2 we had her dropping a block in the bucket each time she heard a sound.
This test seems widly inaccurate. I would call a ped. audiologist. Better safe then sorry. Hearing is important!!
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Old 12-25-2007, 04:01 AM
 
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I have had the same problem with my dd. she's had hearing tests since she was 2 months old but I'm still not convinced she can hear at an average level. I really, really dislike those types of tests because it doesn't work for a child like mine who is developmentally delayed. her responses are all over the place and then they say she passed. it's extremely frustrating, but I'm working it out with her ENT office who really wants to help, and if we come up with a better way, I will let you know.

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Old 12-25-2007, 09:00 AM
 
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My son's first hearing test was like that. Wonder if they designed it like that so that I (the parents) would give the ok for them to do the other hearing test. You know. The one where the child is sedated and it detects the brainwaves in response to the sound. He passed that one and ended up with a dx of autism...
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Old 12-25-2007, 09:52 AM
 
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The test sounds like it wasn't conducted entirely right. Talking is not a good way to test hearing. Some kids can hear it and not understand it or not be able to process what is being said. It doesnt' tell you anything about the ability to hear. I would look for an audiologist who uses the tones, like the pp mentioned. My children both had tests like that. Tones and they'd need to look, then be rewarded with an animal that moves. It seemed to work pretty well. My dd passed. My ds failed. He couldn't hear, she could. A pediatric audiologist might be better to do the test. I also wouldn't wait six months, but go right away. My ds, just turned 3, had fluid in his ear that wasn't visible, but he is still suffering effects on his language even a year after the problem was corrected. It takes a long time for them to catch up if that is the problem.
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Old 12-25-2007, 12:47 PM - Thread Starter
 
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They mentioned a test where they hook some diodes up to his brain and measure brainwaves. Thats what they said they could do at the Texas childrens hospital. Does the child always have to be sedated for this test or are there some other tests for this where they do not have to be sedated?

I am afraid the tone test with an animal reward would take forever for him to catch on. He would have to do it many times to understand I think.

Although playing a tone makes a lot more sense than talking. If he is interested in something a lot of time he will just ignore someone talking. He would probably look at a tone cause its something unfamiliar.
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Old 12-25-2007, 01:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Austinsmom View Post
Although playing a tone makes a lot more sense than talking. If he is interested in something a lot of time he will just ignore someone talking. He would probably look at a tone cause its something unfamiliar.
That's the idea. My dd had no idea what was going on when she first had the tone test. She wouldn't have responded to a person's voice at all, nor could she follow directions or talk at all. But, she heard the unfamiliar sound and looked in that direction. Then, the animal moved. She did like to watch the animal, but more the audiologist was trained to see subtle clues that she was looking for the tone and in the right direction. It's not foolproof, but it gives you an idea.

Mine were never sedated for any hearing test, although I do think there is one they can do that way. They did the tone test and a couple of tests that measured the responsiveness of the ear physically.
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Old 12-25-2007, 11:26 PM
 
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This does sound like a strange test.
He doesn't really need to understand to respond to the typical test. They play a tone and then the child will tend to look toward the sound and see the animal move. They keep doing tones looking for response.
They an also hook up the ears and test high ranges without him responding at all (no sedation...he can sit on your lap).
And then I'm shocked they did a hearing exam and didn't do a tympanogram (however that is spelled). This sounds like a poor test. I don't get it.
Seems like at the children's hospital an audiologist could do an actual exam (properly) first before skipping to the brain waves part.

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Old 12-26-2007, 12:34 AM
 
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I can't tell you what to do, but I'll share my experience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fairejour View Post
My audiologist plays "pure sounds" from the left or right, if the child looks around they have a little dancing dog to reward them.
My ds was tested this way by an audiologist at the ENT office, and he "passed." It didn't sit right with me. I felt they gave him credit for things in the sound booth that they shouldn't have, even though they felt confident about the results and claimed they were able to pick up even subtle stuff. This kind of test, which is also referred to as a "voluntary test" because the child's voluntary responses to sounds are being tested, is an indicator but I don't feel it is particularly diagnostic. I did not feel he was responding normally, despite what the audiologist was saying. I pushed it with the ENT, and he went ahead and referred us for the sedated hearing test.

The idea of a sedated hearing test really freaked me out. I kept putting it off. But in retrospect, I only wish I had done it sooner (he's now had two, and I was comfortable with the procedure the second time around). The sedation is very light. It doesn't need to be a heavy sedation because it is not like they're doing something painful. They just need to be able to test the brain without the child's other activities getting in the way. It's like an induced sleep (actually, they could do the test on a sleeping patient...but it's not the kind of thing a kid would sleep through). I was with my ds the whole time.

This kind of test is one of the most accurate because it tests the brain's involuntary responses to sound. My ds had "passed" the voluntary hearing test, but the sedated test proved that he in fact, had moderate hearing loss.

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Old 12-26-2007, 01:52 AM
 
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My ds was tested this way by an audiologist at the ENT office, and he "passed." It didn't sit right with me. I felt they gave him credit for things in the sound booth that they shouldn't have, even though they felt confident about the results and claimed they were able to pick up even subtle stuff. This kind of test, which is also referred to as a "voluntary test" because the child's voluntary responses to sounds are being tested, is an indicator but I don't feel it is particularly diagnostic. I did not feel he was responding normally, despite what the audiologist was saying.
ITA. Especially with a child like mine, who has other dev. delays, I know how she "works" and if there is a weird elephant banging on a drum in a corner, she's going to look in that corner once in a while no matter what, just to see if it's there. It doesn't mean she heard it. She's had those tests about 5 times and she's always looking around the room, wondering what's up with the strange toys. Doesn't convince me one bit that she's hearing a tone.

She has had the BAER (??? that was a guess) when she was two months old, luckily she slept the whole time so they didn't have to sedate her. She passed with flying colors. But from what I understand, that doesn't eliminate the possibility of fluid causing a hearing loss, and it appears upon several of the other tests (the ones where they stick two little plugs in each ear- they never fit correctly in DD because she has *extremely* tiny ear canals)- they've said she does have some fluid.

What the solution to fluid? Tubes? DD has never even had an ear infection. Her ENT has said that it would be next to impossible to get tubes in her ears because of their small size. Is there anything else that can be done besides tubes for fluid? Could you just put a hearing aid on a kid and see what happens with their speech?

sorry to hijack!

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Old 12-26-2007, 02:10 AM
 
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that test sounds messed up to me. We took my then 3 1/2yo for a test and since DS refused headphones we went into a booth with an assistant. He sat on my lap and the assistant distracted him in between sounds/tones that the audiologist played. My DS was totally receptive to the sounds (he looked in their direction) until the man started talking instead of playing tones. This is why I'm concerned with an auditory processing issue. Anyhoo...it sounds like you got a bum test. I'd check out someone else!
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Old 12-26-2007, 05:17 AM
 
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auditory brainstem response (ABR)

do a search for yourself but here is a good starting point article
http://www.emedicine.com/ent/topic473.htm

the ABR can be done while a child sleeps, or they may need to b sedated, I was told it is a screening tool that should be used along with other types of testing.

quote "I am afraid the tone test with an animal reward would take forever for him to catch on. He would have to do it many times to understand I think."

it may take a zillion times but getting acurate results are the most important thing IMO.

we drove 5 hours one way to get into a center only to have our little one- almost 2 years old 'not preform' (meaning... not know what he was susposed to do) we came home with no more knowledge on what he could or could not hear

but we also came home with a mission for him to practice, practice practice and let him develop a little more in his understanding, 3 months later we went back and he did the tests like a pro.

what you should look for in a tester is someone who works with your child and their abilty, whether age related, physical related or what have you, they should try dfferent ways to get your child to respond to the things they hear, whether it's the drum in the corner or the chance to hold the toy, a little food reward, the chance to ring the bell or light the light.

If you feel like your child is not hearing and you think the test itself did not accuratly measure things then I would do everything that you could do to have him retested and I would do it as soon as possible, I would not wait the 6 months they are saying. Once you have the appointment set up I would call and ask to speak to the person who will be doing the test and see what you can do at home beforehand to help them get the most accurate results as possible. (may have to leave a call back number and a message)

you may have a week or you may have a month or 2 before you can get the appoinment and during that time you can work on ways that your child can 'respond' when they hear something.
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Old 12-26-2007, 04:24 PM
 
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We've had 2 ABR's for our son who we were very lucky accommodated us by sleeping deeply through. They are the only way to get a completely accurate hearing profile of a young child. If you are really concerned, I'd strongly recommend pushing for one. If there are hearing problems, as there are with my son, you really want to start work with early intervention as soon as possible so that language development isn't impacted.
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