He's growing, but it really looks like he's shrinking...... - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 37 Old 03-18-2008, 10:29 PM - Thread Starter
 
bdavis337's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sleep Deprivation, USA
Posts: 6,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
When does the growth chart matter? My oldest, just turned 7 this month, has been around the 50th since his 2nd birthday. He was nearly off the charts large for the first year, and has been steadily moving downward since then. He's built like my father's side of the family, and is strong, muscular and very well proportioned. He doesn't look underweight, but he does have more "boniness" than I've ever seen. All my babies are big year 1 and then slow down to more average sizes, but he keeps dropping and dropping! His 2 1/2 yo brother weighs only 16 lbs less than he, and is at this age wearing the clothes T wore at age 4. I know all children will vary, even w/in families, but it's such a drastic difference.

At his recent annual exam, he was 49 lbs and 47 inches, putting him in the 39th for weight and the 31st for height. To me, he seems tall, b/c he's grown a good bit this year in height. He's only put on 3 lbs. Against his peers, he's a pipsqueak. He has a significant number of oral aversions, has a limited food vocabulary and eats barely enough to get by. His alltime favorite meal is scrambled eggs and toast, he won't eat sauces, gravies or even dip things into dressing. He refuses high fat foods like avocado, cheeses and whole milk, so it's very hard to calorie-load him. He avoid like the plague of death any simple carb food - no rice, no potatoes. I believe he knows what his body can and cannot handle, but the limiting is getting more extreme, and I can't keep up.

I find myself mildly concerned that he's slowly slipping b/c of his ever-increasingly bad eating habits. I know SOMEONE has to be in these percentages, but I'm watching him slowly slide farther down......we're also in the process of eval'ing him for adhd, he has insanely low ferritin levels (13.1) and I am suspicious that he has zinc and magnesium deficiencies as well.

Perhaps I'm just gathering my private thoughts in a public place.......
bdavis337 is offline  
#2 of 37 Old 03-18-2008, 11:21 PM
crl
 
crl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 3,567
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I kind of know how you feel. DS was very big for his age, but he hasn't really grown much for the last year. I know kids slow down at around 4, but this is a bit much. I'm hoping that his recently discovered milk allergy accounts for it and he starts putting weight back on. . . . It is frustrating though that he mostly rejects protein and now that we've had to eliminate milk/cheese/yogurt we lost a big source of that for him.

No advice, just hugs.
crl is offline  
#3 of 37 Old 03-19-2008, 12:22 AM
 
RedOakMomma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: A little stone house
Posts: 6,913
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My son (another very picky eater...he wouldn't eat meat if his life depended on it, and seems to exist on whole milk, popcorn, cheerios, and goldfish crackers) is very similar.

He was off the charts for his first couple of years (breastfed), and since then has slowed down considerably. I think it does have to do with his eating, and his low calorie/incomplete nutrition diet. How could eating like that help but slow your growth?

I've tried all kinds of supplements and nutrition boosters, but in the end his food choices seem to be getting more narrow and more off-and-on. He's in a phase right now where he'll eat vitamins (the non-aspartame ones, of course).

I've reached a point where I'm kinda . I mean, his pickiness/food choices can't help but have an effect on his eventual size. The same way American kids got taller and taller each generation because access to great diets/nutrition improved....well, consider my son a step in the opposite direction.

As long as he's physically healthy, I've decided I'm not going to worry so much about his size and percentages. I might not always feel that way, but for now I do.

RedOak ~ Momma to DS (8) , DS (4) , DD (3) , & DD 9/10 ~
RedOakMomma is offline  
#4 of 37 Old 03-19-2008, 10:55 AM
 
mamaverdi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Food aversions can be a tough thing to distinguish b/w regular old pickiness v. actual physical problem.

When growth is usually looked at is when they are falling off their own curve.

I personally would put the sum of his symptoms together and see if there is a biochemical reason for them.

So not "ADHD" but rather, the symptoms that would make you call it ADHD: hyperactivity, inability to focus, etc etc etc.

And then look into the things that are related to the sum of these symptoms for an answer to the whole of what is going on.

So: Allergies, sleep problems, malabsorption, GI problems, metabolic problems. There are lots of reasons for ADHD-type behaviors. And several of these go hand-in-hand with nutritional deficiencies. But the nutritional deficiencies COULD be there BEFORE the food aversions.

Not sure if I'm making sense. Maybe after some coffee I can explain more if I'm not clear.
mamaverdi is offline  
#5 of 37 Old 03-19-2008, 11:00 AM
 
sbgrace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 9,213
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It would concern me. I'm concerned about my own kiddo; I just don't know what to do about it. Protein rich drink which I know you're working on might fill in the big gaps; you can do fats and carbs there too if you find something he really likes as a base taste. Correcting those nutrient deficiencies might make a difference too. Iron affects growth (and growth further depletes it) as does zinc deficiency. I know supplementing him might be really hard though.

Rachelle, mommy to 8 year old boys! 

My Blog-free homeschooling finds and my lesson plans and link to the new User Agreement

sbgrace is offline  
#6 of 37 Old 03-19-2008, 03:14 PM
 
Jillybean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: NC
Posts: 615
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm the same boat, in fact I could have written most of your post. My ds1 was big for his age for his first two years or so but has been sliding down the growth charts ever since. We just had his 6yo check up and he's 46lbs, down to the 30 something percentile. He's grown very little in the past year. I am worried. Unfortunatley I don't know what to do about it either. His food aversions just keep getting worse.

Quote:
As long as he's physically healthy, I've decided I'm not going to worry so much about his size and percentages
I like this approach and I try to not worry but its stressful! I just try to remind myself that I can't force him to eat anything.

Right now my only plan is to see if he'll drink some type of instant breakfast drink or even pediasure, but I doubt he will. Wish I had some better advice for you!

Mama to Boy (10) Other Boy (7) and Girl (4)   mdcblog5.gif in my profile!

Jillybean is offline  
#7 of 37 Old 03-19-2008, 04:12 PM
 
LynnS6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pacific NW longing for the Midwest
Posts: 12,565
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So, I know that the last thing you need is another eval or another therapy, but have you thought about having him eval'd by an OT or someone who does feeding therapy? Since your younger son is on the autism spectrum, it's very possible that your older one has sensory issues too, and that might cause a food aversion.

My dh has food aversions, and it's tough, really really tough. Part of it is texture, part is taste. For him, since meats and starches are on the list of things he will eat, he's never had a problem with weight.

Lynnteapot2.GIF, academicreading.gif,geek.gif wife, WOHM  to T jog.gif(4/01) and M whistling.gif (5/04)
LynnS6 is offline  
#8 of 37 Old 03-19-2008, 05:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
bdavis337's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sleep Deprivation, USA
Posts: 6,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
These are great responses, I didn't expect anything at all!!

Lynn, I spoke with my toddler's language therapist today wrt Tim's oral issues, and she suggested that since we cannot afford any private therapy for him that I do a few basic things with him at home, and she'll give me all sorts of material to read and ask her questions to start him on a basic program. Just from our brief coversation she suggests that he is overly sensitive to oral sensation, and that his continued limiting is a reaction to his growing inability to regulate that sensation. I've already had Tim informally eval'd by Mark's OT, and she agrees that he has some sensory issues that are definetely impacting his behavior, attention and activity.

We started digestive enzymes yesterday, and I'm hoping that we see good results from them as well. I know he's probably got a host of nutritional deficiencies, and I'm crossing my fingers that the enzymes will help his body balance some of that out. He also gets a multivite daily. The enzymes smell and taste very strong, he's not happy with them and I can see it turning it a fight very early on, so I'll have to find a way to manage that. Mamaverdi, I DO think he has some absorption issues, and I know that his adhd is probably not the most appropriate path for him, b/c I can see the correlation between his increasingly restricted diet/eating habits and his decline in behavioral and emotional stability.

I wish I could say that I know he's physically healthy, so I can avoid spending energy worrying about it, but I KNOW he's not. I know he's got some deficiencies, and that "things" are getting worse as he gets older. He takes a few supplements already - fish oil, iron and a regular multivite.

My last tactic at this point is to come up with a new menu for dinnertime. He mentioned that he's bored with what I serve (there are only so many ways I can make a bowl of scrambled eggs fun!) and so we've dug out the cookbooks and are going to try one new recipe each week. He suggests sausage pizza and hotdogs as good additions - I can work with the pizza idea anyway!
bdavis337 is offline  
#9 of 37 Old 03-19-2008, 07:57 PM
 
mamaverdi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
to you both. Have you ever seen the book The Sneaky Chef?

I thought it was going to be lame, but I : it. And my guys aren't picky eaters....but they are food avoiders...but for health reasons AND sensory reasons. Go figure.
mamaverdi is offline  
#10 of 37 Old 03-19-2008, 10:24 PM - Thread Starter
 
bdavis337's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sleep Deprivation, USA
Posts: 6,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'd not seen that one! I do have Deceptively Delicious, and I've succeeded with a few recipes, but only those that use lighter colored veggies that blend easily taste-wise. If he can see it/feel it in his mouth, it's all over, even if there's no taste.
bdavis337 is offline  
#11 of 37 Old 03-19-2008, 10:59 PM
 
mamaverdi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The principle behind this book (which came first) is that if you can see it, taste it, smell it, know it's there, then it DOESN'T qualify.

I made chocolate cupcakes that have spinach and blueberries. My dh says, these are really yummy. I say, cool cuz they have spinach and blueberries. He says, oh, if they do then they are really gross. But since they DON'T, then they are yummy. I had to CONVINCE him that they did.

We also made chocolate chip cookies with white beans in them.

I didn't like the icing.

Oh, we did : adding a little yoghurt to ranch dip: made it go farther, and tasted better.

I : most of the recipes I've tried. Plus, she has ideas for just adding something nutritious w/o a specific recipe...like using broth instead of water.

I'm a pretty healthy cook, and my boys are pretty good eaters. But I just felt like we aren't getting enough fruits and veggies.

Tonight I made butternut squash soup (Imagine) and blended in white beans. NO ONE knew.
mamaverdi is offline  
#12 of 37 Old 03-19-2008, 11:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
bdavis337's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sleep Deprivation, USA
Posts: 6,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Tim won't eat soup. Of any kind. Grrrrrrr!!!!

So far my successes have been to use a 1/4 cup of sweet potato puree in the egg mixture for french toast, and to use white bean puree in the egg mixture when I make breaded chicken parm. Sadly, he has decided he no longer likes the breading on the chicken (I've been doing this for months, he's never noticed, just last week he said "no more breading").

There's a chocolate pudding with avocado I'd like to try, but avocado is expensive, and I can't imagine possibly wasting TWO cups of it!!
bdavis337 is offline  
#13 of 37 Old 03-19-2008, 11:13 PM
 
mamaverdi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
TWO cups of avocado? Wow.

There is ice cream for breakfast in the Sneaky Chef book. My boys : that.

And I hope I didn't sound so clueless. I was using the soup as an example of things to do. The book kind of sparked my imagination for things that my boys will eat, and how to make them have MORE nutritional value.
mamaverdi is offline  
#14 of 37 Old 03-20-2008, 01:37 PM
crl
 
crl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 3,567
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I haven't tried the sneaky recipes--are they mostly about veggies and fruits? Because we're okay there. What I need is more non-dairy protein.

I bought some garbanzo bean flour at Whole Foods today (was actually looking for almond flour, but at nearly $14 for a small bag I decided against that). I'm planning to try making pumpkin muffins and substituting some of the garbanzo bean flour for the regular flour--maybe 1/4 of it?

I'm also going to try cooking the cous cous (usually a hit) in chicken broth to up the protein and see if he still likes it.
crl is offline  
#15 of 37 Old 03-20-2008, 02:56 PM - Thread Starter
 
bdavis337's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sleep Deprivation, USA
Posts: 6,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I need his diet to expand to include:

non-dairy protein
good fats
veggies
fruits

hehe, that's the entire food pyramid, is it not? He's so limited it's getting hard to feed everyone elsel if that akes sense.

Deceptively Delicious is all about friut/veggie trickery.
bdavis337 is offline  
#16 of 37 Old 03-20-2008, 03:47 PM
 
mamaverdi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The Sneaky Chef has ways to get healthier food all together into them. So, making a flour mix of unbleached and whole wheat and wheat germs. Good oils. Fruits and Veggies. Good proteins. She has beans in several things: like chocolate chip cookies. She talks about organics, food quality, etc etc.

He said he wanted sausage pizza and hot dogs? Could you get some no-nitrate all beef hotdogs? Or tofu dogs (would he eat those)? For the sausage pizza, you can hide stuff in pizza sauce and probably crust. AND in the sausage. There are several things like that in the SC cookbook. What about meat balls?

Do you think he could be a celiac? Has he been tested for an GI type disorders?

Another thing, can you add cheese or whole milk to his scrambled eggs? Would he eat fritata? Or quiche?
mamaverdi is offline  
#17 of 37 Old 03-20-2008, 03:55 PM - Thread Starter
 
bdavis337's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sleep Deprivation, USA
Posts: 6,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamaverdi View Post
The Sneaky Chef has ways to get healthier food all together into them. So, making a flour mix of unbleached and whole wheat and wheat germs. Good oils. Fruits and Veggies. Good proteins. She has beans in several things: like chocolate chip cookies. She talks about organics, food quality, etc etc.

He said he wanted sausage pizza and hot dogs? Could you get some no-nitrate all beef hotdogs? Or tofu dogs (would he eat those)? For the sausage pizza, you can hide stuff in pizza sauce and probably crust. AND in the sausage. There are several things like that in the SC cookbook. What about meat balls?

Do you think he could be a celiac? Has he been tested for an GI type disorders?

Another thing, can you add cheese or whole milk to his scrambled eggs? Would he eat fritata? Or quiche?
No cheese on the eggs, but yes, I can (and do!) add whole milk. No quiche, no fritatas, believe me I've tried. I'd never thought about Tim having celiac issues, only his brother. Interesting.....

No, I won't do hotdogs at all. The "real" ones are too pricey for me, and both he and his brother react terribly to the nitrates/sulfites/crap that in the more affordable ones. I've tried tofu in several forms, and he gagged/threw up. The tofu dogs smell different, he refused them on those grounds. Pizza seems like a real workable option for upping his fat/calorie/protein intake. I really don't want to trick him or hide stuff, he's too old and too smart. If I could make my own turkey sausage so it won't have all that junk in it, I might make some headway.

Tell me about beans in cookies! I have one recipe that calls for garbanzo beans in choco chip cookies, but he won't touch the cookies with a ten foot pole since they look like white choco chips.....He's got some very real issues, and I'm running out of options. Today I bought Arby's chicken tenders just to ensure he'd eat some protien. He did, and drank a whole glass of milk as well. But now dinner is coming, and I find myself dreading every.single.meal of the day, b/c it's always a whining, crying, time bomb of a disaster. And as a recovered eating disordered young adult myself, this is really playing into my weaknesses as well, and making me wonder if there's not more psychological going on than I realize.
bdavis337 is offline  
#18 of 37 Old 03-20-2008, 04:21 PM
 
Heavenly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 4,923
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdavis337 View Post

At his recent annual exam, he was 49 lbs and 47 inches, putting him in the 39th for weight and the 31st for height.
My son turned 7 in January and he is only 50 lbs and 48 inches tall. He was only 47 lbs but he gained 3 lbs when he started on the risperdal in December. I think that he looks normal size for a 7 year old. He was a big baby (after his preemie start) and was 28 lbs at a year so basically he gained 23 lbs in his first year and in the 6 years after that he has gained 22 lbs!

Shawna, married to Michael, mommy to Elijah 1/18/01, Olivia 11/9/02, and Eliana 1/22/06
Heavenly is offline  
#19 of 37 Old 03-21-2008, 11:56 AM - Thread Starter
 
bdavis337's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sleep Deprivation, USA
Posts: 6,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I do know that his weight and height are totally within the "good" range for a boy his age. I wouldn't worry at all if he were a "better eater". What is fueling my concern at this point is his continued limiting of the already narrow food list, his reluctance and refusal to even eat decent portions of his acceptable foods, his incredibly low iron/ferritin levels and possibly other nutritional deficiencies, his increasingly difficult behavioral issues, etc. It's not JUST his size, it's the overall picture of HIM, with his tumble down the growth chart coinciding with the rest of the issues.

So I'm totally not worried overall about him being a little guy, I just can't reconcile the whole picture, it's all too much coincidence to be casually brushed off.
bdavis337 is offline  
#20 of 37 Old 03-21-2008, 01:34 PM
crl
 
crl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 3,567
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yeah, DS is still actually big for his age. But he has some pairs of pants he's been wearing for about a year and half now. That's not right. He should be growing, even if slowly. For us, he isn't a terrible eater (loves a wide variety of fruit, eats a fair variety of carbs including whole grains), but he's narrowed his protein selection down and with the recent need to eliminate all dairy, we're out of most of the proteins he did eat.

Anyway, thumbs up to cous cous cooked in chicken broth and thumbs up to chocolate soy nut butter (bought at Whole Foods). Also good news, I found whole wheat Planko bread crumbs at Whole Foods and I'm hoping I can approximate fish sticks with them. . . . I'll let you know if I manage to try the garbanzo bean flour soon.
crl is offline  
#21 of 37 Old 03-21-2008, 03:33 PM
 
LynnS6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pacific NW longing for the Midwest
Posts: 12,565
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Have you read the book "Just Take a Bite"? I've heard good things about it, and it might be a start. "Can't Eat/Won't Eat" looks interesting too, though it's targeted at children with Autism spectrum diagnoses.

Lynnteapot2.GIF, academicreading.gif,geek.gif wife, WOHM  to T jog.gif(4/01) and M whistling.gif (5/04)
LynnS6 is offline  
#22 of 37 Old 03-21-2008, 04:45 PM
 
Mosaic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: La vida loca
Posts: 4,005
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I also think it's common for children to grow one way and then the other: grow up first, then fill out some or fill out and then shoot up. Just look at all the lanky teenage boys! Seriously, though, 30-40th percentile for height and weight seems very healthy, even if he did have some good gains at the beginning of his growth curve.

Mi vida loca: full-time WOHM, frugalista, foodie wannabe, 10+ years of TCOYF 

 

R-E-S-P-E-C-T spells BRAND NEW User Agreement!!

Mosaic is offline  
#23 of 37 Old 03-21-2008, 08:08 PM
 
mamaverdi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Can you get white cheddar and melt it into the eggs? I've also been successful with adding cream cheese to scrambled eggs.

As far as hiding things....here's the deal...why does it matter? My opinion and this is just my opinion is this:

If he can't taste it, and it's good for him (not something that will harm him) then what is the problem if he doesn't know it's there? He doesn't know all the ingredients in most things I'm willing to bet. Plus, there are ingredients that he probably wouldn't eat on their own: like plain flour that makes his bread. Or baking soda in his cookies.

If he thinks he is eating chocolate ice cream for breakfast, but it really is a smoothie frozen and served with sprinkles, who cares?

Really.

If you model good eating, and make sure he gets what he needs, that's the best you can do. Hopefully he will start feeling better, by eating better, and then make more/varied/better choices.

Besides, the fighting, whining, etc does NOT make things good. At all.

I think of it also like taking medicine. Sometimes I'm able to disguise medicine in food so that my sons can eat the medicine WITHOUT the ICK factor.

By disguising other ingredients in foods, you are giving him food as medicine.

Celiac: I would look into it if you are willing, especially if you think his brother may have this issue.

I agree with him about tofu dogs. :yuck I like them with sourkraut, but I'm willing to bet he doesn't eat that.

Sausage: there is soy sausage that you could use and add things to put on the pizza. And then you could also put extra things in the sauce which he wouldn't know are there or see.

Beans in cookies is great northern beans in the blender with some water, blend until completely smooth. You put maybe 1/2 cup into chocolate chip cookies. Also blend up oatmeal until it is flour-fine, and add 1/4-1/2 cup of that for some of the flour. Make the cookies really small...like 1 tsp scoop...They are yummy, and have "extras."

Also the chocolate cupcakes were really good, and had blueberries and spinach. At least my dh couldn't tell.


I get the idea that it isn't his height/weight so much you are worried about but his overall health. Otherwise, I wouldn't be going on like this.
mamaverdi is offline  
#24 of 37 Old 03-22-2008, 12:20 PM - Thread Starter
 
bdavis337's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sleep Deprivation, USA
Posts: 6,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My concern with hiding food within food is that such a major part of this for him is control (smacks of pre-eating disorder, doesn't it?) that I don't want to risk further alienating him from the kitchen table. I think that if he "discovers" the sweet potato in the french toast, he'll be even harder to reach.

I do like the idea of overall enhancing the common foods we eat with healthy additions, like pureed beans in the cookies, whole wheat flours, flaxseed in smoothies, etc. And I do as much of this already as I can without altering the taste. Today I'm making pancakes for breakfasts this upcoming week (I make foods in bulk) and I'm planning to split the batter and do have with applesauce/pureed apples and the other with banana. I have to balance the concept of "sneaking" health into his food vs. just doing it for the health of the whole family.

You're right, FIGHTING over the food is never a positive direction. Last night I made sausage pizza, and he ate one huge piece, then had a giant milkshake made with whole milk, real vanilla ice cream and a handful of strawberries. I think part of the issue is that *I* need to re-think my direction. I've taken so much OUT of our diets that I've pulled a lot of his favorites as well, and that's been hard for him. I *loathe* sausage, for instance, but I found some bulk sausage w/out msg and not quite as much crap as most of it has, so I bought it. Made my own pizza crust, and voila. Healthier but still fun option, and the boys devoured it. I also asked him to pick out some fun yogurts for himself, and he did choose a few that he's enjoyed. So I'll put the flavored yogurts back on the menu for him, and not worry about the artificial flavors. I just wish I could find some that weren't low or no fat! I've also nixxed hfcs, and it's HARD to find decent snacks and fun foods for him - the yogurt he picked has Oreo crunchies to mix in, and they have hfcs in them, but I suppose it's worth the tradeoff. :

I also think that the digestive enzymes we've started are beginning to show a positive effect for him. I really believe that eating has, for a long time, just uncomfortable and unpleasant for him, he can make a half pbj sandwich last for 30 minutes - I'm pretty sure he's a leaky gut kid - and suddenly last evening he announced that he was "STARVING" and has eaten almost nonstop since 5pm last night, and at breakneck speed. So I think the enzymes might be doing some good after all. Today he had THREE scrambled eggs w/whole milk and a piece of french toast, two glasses of oj, a yogurt and he's currently talking about how he's about to be hungry again.
bdavis337 is offline  
#25 of 37 Old 03-22-2008, 09:35 PM
crl
 
crl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 3,567
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Pumpkin muffins were a success. We used approximately 1/3 white flour, 1/3 wheat and 1/3 garbanzo bean flour. I can't taste the difference and DS ate his happily.
crl is offline  
#26 of 37 Old 03-22-2008, 10:32 PM - Thread Starter
 
bdavis337's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sleep Deprivation, USA
Posts: 6,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I want to pick up the Sneaky Chef book to add to my arsenal, CRL you're fueling my desire!

MV, and everyone else, thanks so much for your insight, book rec's and comments. Truly truly I do love this forum. Tim's issues barely qualify me to post on his behalf here - undx'ed adhd behaviors, low weight gain, eating issues.....he's not truly a sn kid, but y'all gave it up anyway. And I thank you for it! I'm feeling less stressed about it, and much more positive now that I've had a chance to really breathe about it all.

This upcoming week I'll contact the behavioral counselor who oversees the therapuetic sib group he attends weekly and ask if she might be able to do some one on one with him for a few months, I think he needs the outlet. And he gets his blood drawn at the end of next month to re-check his ferritin, so I can sneak in a weight check without him thinking anything of it, since we'll be at the dr. office and whatnot anyway. He's totally resisted the oral brushing, so that's out. But we've had two really good days at the kitchen table - lots of good fats, high calorie foods like cheese, whole milk, sausage, homemade potato fries, and some fun stuff too like french toast and salmon patties. So I feel less dramatic overall.

Thanks again!! Love you guys!
bdavis337 is offline  
#27 of 37 Old 03-22-2008, 10:52 PM
 
2boyzmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Dayton, Oh WPAFB
Posts: 5,976
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
:

Connor is very small...at just over a year old, he's 18 pounds (birth weight 8-4) and only 27 inches. So his weight for his height is right on, he doesn't look tiny, until you put him up against other 1 yr olds. There are many contributing factors to his size:

Part of it is his syndrome...short stature is common.

Part of it is digestive issues...his hypotonia effects his digestion so he has pretty severe reflux and constipation (both of thsoe we're controlling through diet fairly well so far) Therefore he just doesn't eat much.

Part of it is his developmental delays make him less mobile than most 1 yr olds, so therefore he burns less calories, therefore he doesn't need as many.

Part of it is his dysphagia and palatal issues that make eating difficult.

Part of it is his laryngomalacia that makes breathing a bit more difficult, thereby expending more calories just to breathe (he used to also have tracheo and bronch malacia, but he has grown out of both of those)

So all those combine to make him very small for his age (way below the growth charts for height and weight). Before we had his syndrome diagnosed, I was really obsessing about his weight, it was/is such a struggle to get weight on him, I took him to every lactation consultant in the area (and contacted several others online), I took him to several nutritionists, I fought with the drs (even the GIs) who tried to *make* me supplement with formula (and one stupid nutritionist who said that rice cereal would solve his weight gain problems).

Now it all makes sense... But my worry (and why I'm taking notes on this thread) is because he is already a very picky eater. He hardly eats anything, and when he does, it's a bite or two and he's done. He seems to like meats and breads, some fruits, some veggies, actually he has decent variety, he just eats so little of it. And he has a dairy and soy sensitivity, so I can't "fatten" up the foods he does eat.

He's still breastfeeding 4-6 times a day on weekdays and 10+ times a day on weekends (I WOH which is why he doesn't nurse as much on weekdays) so for now he gets a bulk of good calories that way. But I worry about when he weans. I also am finding it harder and harder to stay on the dairy/soy free diet myself...luckily he seems to be tolerating soy much better (through my breastmilk) and even a bit of dairy (in fact, I'm eating a bowl of ice cream right now ) so maybe he's on his way to outgrowing those sensitivities.

Anyway...since he's delayed in gross motor skills and will probably not be walking anytime soon, I guess I should be happy that he's so light, right?!?

Mommy to BigBoy Ian (3-17-05) ; LittleBoy Connor (3-3-07) (DiGeorge/VCFS):; BabyBoy Gavin (10-3-09) x3 AngelBaby (1-7-06)
2boyzmama is offline  
#28 of 37 Old 03-23-2008, 02:14 AM
 
lactationlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: 5 minutes away from insanty
Posts: 1,120
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2boyzmama View Post
:

Connor is very small...at just over a year old, he's 18 pounds (birth weight 8-4) and only 27 inches. So his weight for his height is right on, he doesn't look tiny, until you put him up against other 1 yr olds. There are many contributing factors to his size:

So all those combine to make him very small for his age (way below the growth charts for height and weight). Before we had his syndrome diagnosed, I was really obsessing about his weight, it was/is such a struggle to get weight on him, I took him to every lactation consultant in the area (and contacted several others online), I took him to several nutritionists, I fought with the drs (even the GIs) who tried to *make* me supplement with formula (and one stupid nutritionist who said that rice cereal would solve his weight gain problems).

Now it all makes sense... But my worry (and why I'm taking notes on this thread) is because he is already a very picky eater. He hardly eats anything, and when he does, it's a bite or two and he's done. He seems to like meats and breads, some fruits, some veggies, actually he has decent variety, he just eats so little of it. And he has a dairy and soy sensitivity, so I can't "fatten" up the foods he does eat.

He's still breastfeeding 4-6 times a day on weekdays and 10+ times a day on weekends (I WOH which is why he doesn't nurse as much on weekdays) so for now he gets a bulk of good calories that way. But I worry about when he weans. I also am finding it harder and harder to stay on the dairy/soy free diet myself...luckily he seems to be tolerating soy much better (through my breastmilk) and even a bit of dairy (in fact, I'm eating a bowl of ice cream right now ) so maybe he's on his way to outgrowing those sensitivities.

Anyway...since he's delayed in gross motor skills and will probably not be walking anytime soon, I guess I should be happy that he's so light, right?!?
My dd is also very small, in fact she would make Connor look big - barely topped 14lbs at 1yr, almost-but-not-quite 19lbs at 2yrs. I don't worry too much, because I know it is due to her syndrome.

We do, however, try to make the most of everything she takes in. She is also sensitive to soy and dairy. We are fortunate to have a source of fresh goat milk and she will drink a little of that (4-8oz per day). We try to increase the fat and calories of everything that she eats and drinks. We add olive oil or walnut oil to all of her veggies and virgin coconut oil to her fruits. We had coconut milk to her juice and smear her toast with a thick layer of coconut "butter". Sometimes I use Earth Balance butter substitute. It has soybean oil in it, but no dairy and she seems to tolerate it just fine. She used to eat a lot of avocado, but seems to have tired of it now. I found buffalo mozzarrella(sp?) at Costco and she will eat that. Eggs are her primary source of protein. She eats scrambled eggs almost every day. Some days I get so tired of having to think so hard about what to feed her, but she doesn't gain weight if we don't keep up with it.

p.s. We must have had to same nutritionist! We had one too that tried to convince us that we should give her pumped milk (since I kept refusing formula) with rice cereal. Nevermind the fact that she couldn't take more than an ounce from a bottle until she was almost 10mos old. Sometimes they just don't get it.

And I agree - everytime I am carrying Rebekah around, I am greatful that she is not a 34lb 2yo like her sister!
lactationlady is offline  
#29 of 37 Old 03-23-2008, 01:26 PM
 
mamaverdi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdavis337 View Post
My concern with hiding food within food is that such a major part of this for him is control (smacks of pre-eating disorder, doesn't it?) that I don't want to risk further alienating him from the kitchen table. I think that if he "discovers" the sweet potato in the french toast, he'll be even harder to reach.
I don't really know that much about eating disorders to tell you the truth. I will say this, I think it's fairly common from what I've observed for kids to want to be in control of their food. Kids don't have control over a lot.

I think if my older ds (who is also very bright and doesn't like the idea of eating things he didn't know were in there, I would tell him, quite honestly, that that is just part of my recipe and that he had been eating it like that the whole time I had been making french toast for him.

If you have access to them, there are some really yummy flavors of organic yoghurts that don't have artificial flavors. Also, offering him crushed Newman's Oreos on top of them.

You could probably buy a BIG thing of vanilla yoghurt, and a whole pkg of Newman's Oreos, and then make a ton more than you could get of just those little ones for a similar price per piece.

Digestive enzymes are awesome.

If you are getting a blood draw for ferritin, add in the ones for celiac. I can look it up for you, or I think that LabCorp's celiac panel is the one our GI recommended.

I'm so so glad I'm able to help.
mamaverdi is offline  
#30 of 37 Old 03-23-2008, 01:29 PM
 
mamaverdi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
2boyzmama, my youngest has a lot more issues than my oldest. But getting him enough and frequently enough so that he will stay well is a big deal around here. That's part of why I got that Sneaky Chef book.

He actually ate pancakes this morning with whole wheat flour, blueberries and peaches (blended into whole milk yoghurt)!!!!

But at 1 y o, he was still ONLY drinking donor milk. Actually until he was 3.5, he was mostly living on donor milk, and NOT staying well most of the time.

His swallowing hasn't really gotten a lot better, but his chewing has, and this has made a big difference.

He's about to be 4.
mamaverdi is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off