Mothering Forums

Mothering Forums (http://www.mothering.com/forum/)
-   Special Needs Parenting (http://www.mothering.com/forum/157-special-needs-parenting/)
-   -   stimming behavior--pacing while looking at walls and lines? (http://www.mothering.com/forum/157-special-needs-parenting/903461-stimming-behavior-pacing-while-looking-walls-lines.html)

wishfulmom 05-24-2008 06:10 PM

Hi, I am new here. This is a great site and I'm really pleased to see such an active sn area to post. My son is 3 and a half and devel delayed and he seems to have processing issues. We dont have a dx yet for him but he gets OT, ST, PT and special ed services. My question is about a behavior he does with walking along walls and stairing at the wall, mostly if there are lines along the wall and walking rather quickly. He does this also with counter tops, or other lined areas that are his head height. He usually does it mostly if he is tired or stressed or there is too much sensory stimulation going on around him. At school they have walked behind him and held their hands against the sides of his eyes to shield his vision and to look ahead (think like a horses eye shield). He doesn't look forward at all when he does this so it's pretty unsafe. He bumps into people and things. He really wants to look at the wall so when they block his vision he doesn't get the impact he wants and moves on to something more appropriate. This is ok at a more controlled area like school but I'm thinking for other public areas like grocery store etc. He can do well in these areas some times. I havn't seen anything about this kind of stimming on other sites or books and we're looking for ideas to help him. We've thought of something he could hold like pics of a train track or something visual like that. My sister had an idea (could work at certain times) of saying something like, "I see you need some time to walk and look at the wall. How about we walk for XX amount of time and then we'll go back to __________ " (whatever it is that he needed a break from). We sort of do this now but making it more concrete and more like a tool to use. Any ideas, suggestions or anyone known of this kind of behavior before?

feebeeglee 05-24-2008 07:24 PM

I know two mamas here, finch and sbgrace, both have autistic sons who loved to stim on edges and lines. I think your sister has a great idea. Can he understand that 'first this, then this' sort of logic?

Oh and welcome to the MDC SN forum, one of the best places on the internet

sbgrace 05-24-2008 09:37 PM

Welcome!!

Fee, I'm incredibly impressed you noticed/remembered that!

Yep, my spectrum kiddo is a lines guy. He does exactly what you describe in fact. To be honest, I've not found a good re-direct for him. Though if I can give him a table at eye height he might then circle that instead. But I don't think a picture would work with my kid at least. It seems like it has something to do with the visual of moving along the line/edge. Sometimes he'll instead watch something as he moves it along an edge--so something straightish like a block moving along a line or edge at his eye level. Chairs work good for straight edges at eye level that are sort of contained. Maybe you could try that and see. But it seems like the stimulation he gets from moving himself along is different than when he's moving something. Though I've never tried to re-direct him from one to the other. They just seem different.

My child does this a lot more when he's tired, feeling sick, or stressed. So I figure he needs it. Can you just walk with him or in front of him when it is unsafe to make sure he doesn't run over people or walk into walls or other things (all stuff my kid has done many times) or does he want to be alone to do it? I guess we're sort of lucky in that our neighbors have a fence and we have a long, clear hallway in our house. So he's got lots of safe places to do his thing.

I wish I had a great suggestion. We just sort of work around it. It seems like maybe the school could adapt a little too. Just because I suspect our kids need this at times. But at least I can tell you that no, you aren't the only one to see this!

feebeeglee 05-24-2008 10:10 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by sbgrace View Post
Fee, I'm incredibly impressed you noticed/remembered that!
I remember enough small details about people to scare them sometimes - but I promise I'm not a stalker! Just observant. And I do better with written than spoken, so I remember forum stuff with even more ease.

Ahem, carry on!

aiccerb 05-25-2008 01:03 AM

Hey mama welcome to the board! I’ve got a wall, edge, line and general all round visual stimmer here too My DS had a bruise on the right side of his head (unilateral visual stimmer) for the better part of his second year

When we are going to be going down town or somewhere that I would be concerned about safety we make sure we offer him some type of movement activity for some visual feedback before we go. So if we are going to my MIL who has a beautiful HARD wood table that he cant resist...we will stop at the park on the way there and give him a few pushes in the tire swing. At home we redirect to the mini-trampoline; he still gets some visual feedback and the jumping is organizing for him.

Kind of a long your sisters idea, we have small strips of corrugated cardboard (raised ridges) or some reflective coloured paper the has vertical striping that he keeps in his back pack for times that he cant move around, like in a restaurant. He usually puts them on a table, and stares/slightly wiggles his head. Safe and not particularly disruptive to others.

On the days where nothing but a good edge will do, we have a pair of sunglasses that we put on him, with super thin little strips of scotch tape (at about the angle he would normally tilt his head). The tape is hardly noticeable to others, but it gives him something to focus on. Works like a charm. He can usually still interact with us while still meeting his visual need.

Best of luck mama

bdavis337 05-25-2008 01:18 AM

I can understand why, in a school setting like walking in the hallways, the teachers would need a method of moving your son safely from place to place, which might mean preventing or shortening his stimming in that way. And your ideas about pictures and straight stuff he could carry with him are also great ideas. My son is a spinner/wheels guy, so he has little toy cars with him at.all.times. just in case the need arises.

I've had absolutely no luck trying to limit Mark's visual stimming other than totally redirecting by leaving the house or breaking out a major attention grabber, like food, or taking a bath.

thebarkingbird 05-25-2008 01:36 AM

oh! when i was stressed or bored i used to HAVE TO (now it's a little less intense) look at surface contours and reconstruct in my mind the simplest blade that could create the shapes if they were made out of icing. i bumped into things alot.

i like the idea of suggesting that he look up sometimes and then down. i know it can get dirty but could he be satisfied running his hand along the edges and not looking or feeling the edge of an object and visualizing it. i do that sometimes and it helps.

i keep hoping my son talks more soon. he trips all the time and i've yet to figure out the pattern of things he likes to look at. i think it's between lights an spinny things.

vki123 04-21-2014 01:17 PM

I know this is a shot in the dark, but does anyone here have an update on how this stimming behavior has changed/improved/remained over the years? My 2.4 year old does the same thing, has been doing this since when he was 19 mos old. We've had him evaluated and they've diagnosed him with a regulatory disorder (did not meet criteria for ASD). We are awaiting an OT evaluation but I would love to hear about things I could possibly do to help him. 


Carebear2 06-24-2014 06:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wishfulmom (Post 11306779)
Hi, I am new here. This is a great site and I'm really pleased to see such an active sn area to post. My son is 3 and a half and devel delayed and he seems to have processing issues. We dont have a dx yet for him but he gets OT, ST, PT and special ed services. My question is about a behavior he does with walking along walls and stairing at the wall, mostly if there are lines along the wall and walking rather quickly. He does this also with counter tops, or other lined areas that are his head height. He usually does it mostly if he is tired or stressed or there is too much sensory stimulation going on around him. At school they have walked behind him and held their hands against the sides of his eyes to shield his vision and to look ahead (think like a horses eye shield). He doesn't look forward at all when he does this so it's pretty unsafe. He bumps into people and things. He really wants to look at the wall so when they block his vision he doesn't get the impact he wants and moves on to something more appropriate. This is ok at a more controlled area like school but I'm thinking for other public areas like grocery store etc. He can do well in these areas some times. I havn't seen anything about this kind of stimming on other sites or books and we're looking for ideas to help him. We've thought of something he could hold like pics of a train track or something visual like that. My sister had an idea (could work at certain times) of saying something like, "I see you need some time to walk and look at the wall. How about we walk for XX amount of time and then we'll go back to __________ " (whatever it is that he needed a break from). We sort of do this now but making it more concrete and more like a tool to use. Any ideas, suggestions or anyone known of this kind of behavior before?





My 21 months old son does the same. He would look at the wall and pacing for long time. Like he's imagination something.
I know this post is about few years ago. Would like to know if your son still doing it. I wonder if my son would keep doing it and at school in the future.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:26 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.