Sensory Processing Disorder in 9 year old dd - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 01:33 PM - Thread Starter
 
candipooh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San Bernardino, CA
Posts: 4,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
She is putting on her shoes. The socks need to be turned inside out. The seams drive her crazy. They still drive her crazy when they are inside out, she takes scissors and cuts the seams so they are small as possible while still holding the socks together. She is almost frantic at the thought of wearing regular shoes (as apposed to sandals) But the place we are going requires toed shoes. She gets them on and goes to sit in the car. The sensation is way too much for her. She gets goose bumps on her arms. She feels her stomach tighten. Her sisters next to her start chatting. It is just WAY TOO MUCH. She starts to panich. She can not handle the sound of the car, the chatting of her sister AND the feel of her shoes.


I am about 90% sure my 9 year old has Sensory Processing Disorder (Hypersensitivity) I feel so bad that I haven't pinpointed it until now. I read the lists and see that she did have SO MANY of the sings early on (even as an infant, I just thought she was high spirited) but as she gets older it seems to be getting worse. I remember asking some friends about it a few years ago but they had said that if she didn't have a problem with breastfeeding then she most likely didn't have SPD. But now I see that she doesn't HAVE to have every single symptom listed on every single check list out there. She has enough signs.

Like being at the store and she was distracted by something (her sister perhaps) and did not realize that she had moved closer to the register. The PING that the register made made her scream, cover her ears and cry. Instant headache. She is 9, not at an age that she would do thins to get attention.
It just all adds up. It isn't just that she is just a picky spoiled girl who HAS to have clothing feel a certain way or she won't wear it. She can't help it.
I just want to cry. I read something that said SPD is more common in children who had vaccinations. I didn't stop vacc'ing until she was 6 months old. AND I had the roGram shot when I was pregnant with her. Did I do this to her?
I feel bad complaining because many of you on here have it a lot worse. So I ask forgiveness for my crying.

What do I do now? I ordered two books that I saw recommended a lot. The Out of Sync Child and Sensational Kids.

I do have insurance but will only have it until about Feb of '09. It is a PPO (not HMO) So do I try to find an OT and just call for an appointment? Is this something a family practice Dr. will help with?
Dd also has some sort of learning disorder. I am not sure what it is or if it has anything to do with SPD. Dyslexia perhaps?
I am just so lost. What do I do? Where do I turn?

On a good note...I am in California where we have wonderful Charter Schools. Charter Schools that you home school through. So I home school (I still teach what I want when I want) and get help from a teacher if I need it. I also get funds to help. I know that the charter school will also test for a learning disorder and give her extra help if needed/wanted. I don't know if they will provide OT though. I hope so.


Ok, now for a few questions (er, I mean a few more questions )

Is SPD on the Autism spectrum? A friend said yes but my reading says no, just that children with Autism tend to also have SPD. ??

Can you fix it? Another friend turned around her sons Autism with a special diet. He is now a 'normal' kid. Is there something like that for kids with SPD?

Is it typical for it to get worse at a certain age? I read one site that said it may hit a high point around pre-teen age. Is that true? The last year or two is has gotten a LOT worse.

Is there other moms and dads on MDC that have children with a learning disorder and SPD (Hypersensitivity)? Most that I have found on MDC are Hyposensitivity.



From this web site I figure dd has these problems.

Tactile Dysfunction (Hypersensitivity)
Auditory Dysfunction (Hypersensitivity To Sounds)
Oral Input Dysfunction (Hypersensitivity To Oral Input)
slight Olfactory Dysfunction (Hypersensitivity To Smells) this one is not near as pronounced than the others
Visual Input Dysfunction (Hypersensitivity To Visual Input )
and a touch of the section called
Social, Emotional, Play, And Self-Regulation Dysfunction. The social part doesn't really fit her but the others ones do especially the self-regulation one.
candipooh is offline  
#2 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 04:18 PM - Thread Starter
 
candipooh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San Bernardino, CA
Posts: 4,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Was that just way too much for a first post in this form?
candipooh is offline  
#3 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 04:49 PM
 
ann_of_loxley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Posts: 5,454
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I do not have an official DX - But I am quite positive my son has SPD. He is also hypersensitive.
We are home educators as well - so for now I have not felt a need to get an official DX (its kinda hard to get that here as well - so I have been told, as someone else 'important' would need to refer him...like a teacher...which he will never see lol)...

I have heard, and am quite positive that OT is VERY helpful! I would deffinatly give it a go - but do not know how you would go about that in CA. Getting OT for my son is the only reason why I would bother with a DX for him but at the moment, I feel we are doing fine.

I would bother with a DX for myself more though at this moment. I am not really sure how I feel about lables but it would be nice to say 'hey....!' when you get the judgmental misunderstanding people about it. I have friend who think my son is just manipulative and naughty and of course I am just permissive. We live consensually and I just try to respect his needs and his very sensitive body! If I try to explain to them 'its just to loud for him right now' they dont seem to take that as serious as it really is for my son.

It is hard though. Sometimes its just like 'oh it doenst matter - its just a sound or a feel or whatever!' when its clearly the end of the world for him and my highly sensitive self is about to go over the edge trying to deal with it! It clearly does effect our everyday lives. I feel loney at the moment because I used to try and get out to everything going for children my sons age but I just cant because its often too much for my son.

The only thing that never has seemed to be a problem with my DS is food in his mouth (I have heard that a lot of people with SPD may seem like picky eaters when really they cant handle the sensation of the food in their mouth - this has never been an issue with my son). He will eat anything. But I still have to feed him as we have a fear of wet food touching us outside of our mouth.

SPD is not on the spectrum as far as I am aware - but those with autism do often also have SPD. (pretty much what you said! hehe)

Mummy me : > Thats Ann! and my beautiful SONS Duncanand Hamish 19/09/05 & 22/04/10!
ann_of_loxley is offline  
#4 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 04:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
candipooh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San Bernardino, CA
Posts: 4,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thank you so much! It is just nice to hear "I know how it is, I have been there"

You son is a doll!! And I love his name (it was on my list of names if I ever had a boy. It is a 'family name')


Does he have other problems as well?
candipooh is offline  
#5 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 04:57 PM
 
MommyPam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 112
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't think it was too much for a first post!

My dd (11) is highly sensitive. I brought her to an OT at 10 who said SPD but I think she's on the borderline of highly sensitive and SPD. Unfortunately dd was not open to going to OT - I think it would have been helpful for her, but not if she didn't go into it with an open mind. Being highly sensitive can be a gift, if you can learn to cope with it, and overall I feel dd is doing that.

I believe your school system is obligated to evaluate your dd if you request it. I'm not sure how helpful it will be, but it might be interesting.

A good OT place that has some experience with sensory issues is your best bet for help with the sensory problems. They can help her with a sensory "diet" and give her lots of coping skills. Insurance is kind of iffy on covering OT for sensory issues - some do, some don't.

Others here may have better advice for you. I could relate to the idea of "discovering" sensory issues in an older child, however. Good luck!
MommyPam is offline  
#6 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 05:03 PM
 
ann_of_loxley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Posts: 5,454
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Its a family name here as well (last - my fathers side is Scottish) hehe - I had it on my list of names and it was the only name my DH liked! hehe

Whilst im confident in saying 'yes he has SPD' - I am not so confident or quick to say it but I do think he has PDD-NOS...which might put him just on the spectrum.

You know - I often wonder if I have caused this. He had a traumatic entrance into the world born via section. He had his first set of vaccinations (the 5-in-one and the men c)...Which caused swelling of his brain resulting in that horrible pitched unconsolable scream for hours on end (we dont vax at all now and never will again!) - no real known side effects of that but I have read it could be the cause of things like ADD etc...which makes me wonder if it contributed to/caused his SPD. But at the end of the day I cant beat myself up about it. When you know better - you do better.

Mummy me : > Thats Ann! and my beautiful SONS Duncanand Hamish 19/09/05 & 22/04/10!
ann_of_loxley is offline  
#7 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 05:03 PM
 
chfriend's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: in a red state
Posts: 4,754
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My 7 year old almost certainly has SPD. Longs to wear jeans, but can't.

Wears hannas and seamless socks, etc. etc. .... Everything you describe fits SPD to a T.

In my kid's case, I think there's some learning involvement as well. Very touch and vision oriented (think unit studies and waldorf-y ways of "doing subjects.") Doesn't sit still. (We home educate.)

The Out of Sync child Has Fun is a great *practical* resource for rounding out the sensory diet. There are lots of things you and she can do to make it better. Lots of adaptations are easy and make life go a lot more smoothly. (For example, my dd wears crocs in most circumstances. She rides horses and willingly wears seamless socks and paddock boots for that.)

OT might be a really great idea. We haven't set it up yet, but there's referral network here that had both of the "good" SPD folks in my area on it: http://www.spdfoundation.net/

My dd is not on the autism spectrum.
chfriend is offline  
#8 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 05:06 PM - Thread Starter
 
candipooh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San Bernardino, CA
Posts: 4,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MommyPam View Post
I don't think it was too much for a first post!

My dd (11) is highly sensitive. I brought her to an OT at 10 who said SPD but I think she's on the borderline of highly sensitive and SPD. Unfortunately dd was not open to going to OT - I think it would have been helpful for her, but not if she didn't go into it with an open mind. Being highly sensitive can be a gift, if you can learn to cope with it, and overall I feel dd is doing that.

I believe your school system is obligated to evaluate your dd if you request it. I'm not sure how helpful it will be, but it might be interesting.

A good OT place that has some experience with sensory issues is your best bet for help with the sensory problems. They can help her with a sensory "diet" and give her lots of coping skills. Insurance is kind of iffy on covering OT for sensory issues - some do, some don't.

Others here may have better advice for you. I could relate to the idea of "discovering" sensory issues in an older child, however. Good luck!
Thank you pam.

What is the difference in sensitive and SPD?
candipooh is offline  
#9 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 05:08 PM - Thread Starter
 
candipooh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San Bernardino, CA
Posts: 4,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ann_of_loxley View Post
Its a family name here as well (last - my fathers side is Scottish) hehe - I had it on my list of names and it was the only name my DH liked! hehe

Whilst im confident in saying 'yes he has SPD' - I am not so confident or quick to say it but I do think he has PDD-NOS...which might put him just on the spectrum.

You know - I often wonder if I have caused this. He had a traumatic entrance into the world born via section. He had his first set of vaccinations (the 5-in-one and the men c)...Which caused swelling of his brain resulting in that horrible pitched unconsolable scream for hours on end (we dont vax at all now and never will again!) - no real known side effects of that but I have read it could be the cause of things like ADD etc...which makes me wonder if it contributed to/caused his SPD. But at the end of the day I cant beat myself up about it. When you know better - you do better.
Scottish here too

I keep telling myself to not "beat myself up" and only sometimes do I listen.
candipooh is offline  
#10 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 05:10 PM - Thread Starter
 
candipooh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San Bernardino, CA
Posts: 4,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chfriend View Post
My 7 year old almost certainly has SPD. Longs to wear jeans, but can't.

Wears hannas and seamless socks, etc. etc. .... Everything you describe fits SPD to a T.

In my kid's case, I think there's some learning involvement as well. Very touch and vision oriented (think unit studies and waldorf-y ways of "doing subjects.") Doesn't sit still. (We home educate.)

The Out of Sync child Has Fun is a great *practical* resource for rounding out the sensory diet. There are lots of things you and she can do to make it better. Lots of adaptations are easy and make life go a lot more smoothly. (For example, my dd wears crocs in most circumstances. She rides horses and willingly wears seamless socks and paddock boots for that.)

OT might be a really great idea. We haven't set it up yet, but there's referral network here that had both of the "good" SPD folks in my area on it: http://www.spdfoundation.net/

My dd is not on the autism spectrum.

Thank so much. So there is not really a "cure" but ways to help.

I will look at that link.
candipooh is offline  
#11 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 05:12 PM
 
ann_of_loxley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Posts: 5,454
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by candipooh View Post
Scottish here too

I keep telling myself to not "beat myself up" and only sometimes do I listen.

yeah...saying and doing are two different things and one seems sometimes easier said than done!

Mummy me : > Thats Ann! and my beautiful SONS Duncanand Hamish 19/09/05 & 22/04/10!
ann_of_loxley is offline  
#12 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 05:15 PM - Thread Starter
 
candipooh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San Bernardino, CA
Posts: 4,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I found this very interesting
Quote:
While research indicates that sensory integrative problems are found in up to 70% of children who are considered
learning disabled by schools, the problems of sensory integration are not confined to children with learning
disabilities. SID transfers through all age groups, as well as intellectual levels and socioeconomic groups. Factors
that contribute to SID include:
premature birth; autism and other developmental disorders; learning disabilities;
delinquency and substance abuse due to learning disabilities; stress-related disorders; and brain injury.
Research has identified autism and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as two of the biggest
contributing conditions as well as learning disorders (i.e. Specific learning difficulties), developmental disabilities
and fragile X syndrome.
So yes, it really does go hand in hand with dd's learning disorder.
candipooh is offline  
#13 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 05:20 PM
 
ann_of_loxley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Posts: 5,454
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
there are good youtube videos on things you can do at home to help!

Mummy me : > Thats Ann! and my beautiful SONS Duncanand Hamish 19/09/05 & 22/04/10!
ann_of_loxley is offline  
#14 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 05:39 PM
 
ShaggyDaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,966
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
have you looked into seamless or "diabetic" socks They are specially made for ultra sensitive feet... like these: http://www.footsmart.com/Default.aspx
ShaggyDaddy is offline  
#15 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 05:42 PM
 
KimPM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Maryland
Posts: 1,640
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My DS has SPD. Don't worry about the vaxes "causing" it...my DS has not had a single vax. I had a very comfortable pregnancy, and I did not have RhoGam. I am very careful with what I eat. I don't think any of that caused it. I belive these kinds of things run in families. I have some SPD issues, and so does my mom, but my DS has it way worse than either of us.

I think that OT could help her, though I'm not sure how long it would take being that she's 9. It is definitely worth trying. Sounds like she seriously needs to desensitize her feet. I had feet/sock issues as well, and I think I just about drove my mom nuts with trying to get the socks just right. There are things you can do with the brushing protocol that might help. We did some of that on DS's hands and arms for his extreme hands and mouth sensitivites. It really helped. We used a knobby stiff washcloth instead of buying the specific brushing brush they call for. You would have to get specific suggestions from an OT on how to do the brushing on her legs/feet and how to proceed. If you are going to try it you really need to be doing it correctly.

We also had 8 months of once-a-week feeding therapy from an SLP who does feeding therapy. I believe that he would not be eating any solids at this point if it were not for that therapy. It also took a lot of supplementary work from me. I watched what she was doing and tried to supplement it on the days she wasn't here.

Also, engaging her other senses could also be helpful. I find that getting my son moving and active really helps him. Running, swinging, jumping, spinning, these are all good for him (though they may not ALL be good for every child).

DS also has some hypotonia, but it seems to be confined to his trunk and mouth. I didn't even realize he had this at first, but an OT pointed it out. The SLP helped with oral motor exercises, and I have been trying to exercise his tummy in various ways to help compensate.

He may also be on the spectrum, but I am not really concerned with addressing that as I am things that really stand in his way of living...like eating and sitting up.

If you are going to get a therapist, seek recommendations from other people in your area and/or other therapists who know the good ones!

Part of SPD includes problems with self-regulation. This means they usually need extra help getting themselves sorted out when they get out of sorts. For example, his sleeping has always been atrocious. I find that keeping him on a schedule as best I can seems to help his sleeping somewhat. He also needs my help calming down when he gets agitated or anxious. He really has no ability to self-soothe. The best I can do is try to anticipate what will cause his problems and help him deal with it.

Kim mama to DS 12/2005, Pepper kitty , and 10/03, 1/05;
KimPM is offline  
#16 of 23 Old 07-28-2008, 05:53 PM
 
IfMamaAintHappy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 2,531
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
My 8 yr old and your 9 yr old could be twins

Grace has had some good success with many of her sensory issues through an occupational therapist. Because many of her tactile issues were not dealt with, we are moving exclusively to sensory therapy this fall.

Grace is essentially hypersensitive all the way around like your daughter. If we could just rachet her volume knob down to 9 or 10 rather than 15.. We have had issues with pain during hair brushing, cutting seams and wearing only certain clothes.. and over and over so that they are extra comfy comfy clothes.. pain when she gets a small scrape you;'d think she'd broken a bone...

Usually youd tell your primary doctor/ped and they'd refer you to an OT for an evaluation. In addtion to the out of sync child, see if Raising a Sensory Smart Child and The Explosive Child are books that help you. They have all been helpful to me.

Please, please seek treatment, if just for a short while, for your daughter. You can learn things to do at home to help her, they can talk to you about how helpful it is to maintain a healthy sensory diet (not food related, sensory input related) so that there are fewer tantrums and meltdowns.. I am looking forward to a sensory therapist telling me how best to treat Grace's meltdowns as we have never really found anything that worked.

PM if you want, our daughters are so similar in sensory issues and in age that maybe we could help them form a penpal relatinship, going through the same things.
IfMamaAintHappy is offline  
#17 of 23 Old 07-31-2008, 03:00 PM - Thread Starter
 
candipooh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San Bernardino, CA
Posts: 4,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Frelle thank you for your post! hair brushing yes, that is a nightmare. I wish I could just cut her hair in a short pixie style. Dd is blessed with VERY think VERY curly hair. Not a good combo for a hypersensitive child.
Oh and she had chicken pox last month. That was NOT FUN! But it is finally over and done with.


Quote:
Usually youd tell your primary doctor/ped and they'd refer you to an OT for an evaluation.
I just found out that the charter school does NOT provide OT for SPD. I will now go with the insurance route. I have a PPO, do I still need to make an appointment with out family doctor? I looked through some of the booklets that I have from the insurance and it looks like I will need to call them to get an OK before I seek out help with OT.

I will be PMing you. It will be nice to chat with someone who knows
candipooh is offline  
#18 of 23 Old 07-31-2008, 03:02 PM - Thread Starter
 
candipooh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San Bernardino, CA
Posts: 4,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I started a blog about my journey to understanding Skyler. I am going to keep tract of her issues so I have something to print out and show the Dr. and/or OT.

Understanding Skyler
candipooh is offline  
#19 of 23 Old 07-31-2008, 09:04 PM
 
fanniefarkle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Crackerbox Palace
Posts: 1,346
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ann_of_loxley View Post
there are good youtube videos on things you can do at home to help!
Thanks for posting this!
fanniefarkle is offline  
#20 of 23 Old 07-31-2008, 09:13 PM
 
LynnS6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pacific NW longing for the Midwest
Posts: 12,565
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I would HIGHLY recommend the book: Sensational Kids. It's got a lot of great ideas about things to do for sensory kids as well.

Don't feel bad that you didn't 'recognize' it. It's hard to tell the difference between a kid who needs 'help' and a kid who is just sensitive. (I've got one of each). For me, it comes down to the fact that my child who needed help couldn't ever 'get used' to sounds/textures/stimuli and my sensitive child can. She doesn't like them necessarily, but she doesn't react the 15th time as if she's hearing it the first time.

http://www.spdfoundation.net/ is a decent resource as well.

When we got OT, we went first for an eval through an OT recommended by a friend and THEN we went to our doctor and got a 'medical diagnosis' that allowed our insurance to pay for it. (The OT was very helpful, talked to our doctor and told her what codes to use for the insurance.)

Lynnteapot2.GIF, academicreading.gif,geek.gif wife, WOHM  to T jog.gif(4/01) and M whistling.gif (5/04)
LynnS6 is offline  
#21 of 23 Old 07-31-2008, 10:14 PM
 
LauraLoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: By the light of the silvery moon
Posts: 3,762
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by candipooh View Post
I just found out that the charter school does NOT provide OT for SPD. I will now go with the insurance route. I have a PPO, do I still need to make an appointment with out family doctor? I looked through some of the booklets that I have from the insurance and it looks like I will need to call them to get an OK before I seek out help with OT.
If/when you get set up with a private OT, discuss that your dd's school does not provide OT services. The private OT may be able to visit your dd's school and observe and give recommendations to the teacher directly to help accomodate your dd. At the very minimum, you may be able to ask the OT to write something up regarding what will help your dd perform at her best in school (for example - preferential seating away from distractions such as windows, noise, and close to the teacher.)

Also, not sure if it's been mentioned here, but find an OT that has a very, very good understanding of SPD (sensory processing disorders) and routinely works with kids who have SPD. Some OT's aren't well versed in this arena or not specifically trained in it, and that would defeat your purpose of seeking this treatment.

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

LauraLoo is offline  
#22 of 23 Old 08-03-2008, 12:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
candipooh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San Bernardino, CA
Posts: 4,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi all.

Laura, I actually homeschool through a charter school (almost sounds like an oxymoron doesn't it, lol) . I love California! So I am the teacher, I pick what to teach and how etc. I just get the help of a professional teacher (Educational Specialist) if/when I need it. They do have testing for auditory, processing, visual, motor, and attention processing but not SPD.

Out of my little homeschool group of friends there is 5 of us that have kids with sensory issues and some of the moms suffer from it to some degree. It has very helpful to their advice on it. They know a lot of the OTs in the area too.


I have a lot more to post but I need to get ready. Today is day three of the homeschool convention. I am having a lot of fun and learning a LOT! (just wish they had a session about finding out about special needs and what to do about it)

I will just quickly copy/paste the blog I spit out this am.
****************************

I had bad dreams last night. I was trying to explain to a professional of sorts about Skyler and my suspected SPD. She would not listen and started to yell at me that she thought I was just a bad mother who needed to control her spoiled daughter. Now I am awake with another headache.

Last night Skyler used her SPD issue as an excuse. That is all it was too, an excuse. I wonder if that is why I had the dream. She was getting snippy and angry with her sisters. We were all getting into bed and I was getting ready to read Harry Potter. They were not being loud or really doing anything. She just gets onery at bedtime. When I asked her to please leave her sisters alone she said to me "but mom, I am sensitive" Ugh. I do not want her to use her SPD as an excuse when it has nothing to do with the situation. I don't want her to think it is ok to be a jerk to her sisters because her is "sensitive"

I have shared with her a lot of my learning about SPD and even read her tid-bits of the books. Is this a mistake? I always thought that being open with her was best.

I have been at the homeschool expo all weekend and have had some great talks with friends. I will have a lot to post about after today (today is the last day of the expo) I also got "Sensational Kids" in the mail. Yahoo.
candipooh is offline  
#23 of 23 Old 08-04-2008, 05:30 PM
 
LynnS6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pacific NW longing for the Midwest
Posts: 12,565
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by candipooh View Post
When I asked her to please leave her sisters alone she said to me "but mom, I am sensitive"
To which you respond: "That helps YOU understand why you're upset. But it's not an EXCUSE to bug your sisters."

I think helping her understand is a good idea, but you also need to help her understand things she can do to help herself feel better. Sensational Kids should have some good strategies.

Lynnteapot2.GIF, academicreading.gif,geek.gif wife, WOHM  to T jog.gif(4/01) and M whistling.gif (5/04)
LynnS6 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off