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#1 of 9 Old 08-29-2008, 06:58 PM - Thread Starter
 
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We just had DS (21 mos tomorrow) evaluated for Autism and the results were basically, wait and see. We were told both during the test and today, when we got the official results, how good he was doing in every area except speech (which he'd had a speech eval the week before, and is at 3-6 months for expressive language, and 6-9 mos for receptive language. Which is way more behind than I'd thought and mostly everyone else is telling me I'm silly for worrying about it and he'll talk when he's ready, etc) ... most everything else he is at 15-18 mos or 12-15 mos, which is still withing range of normal development. Anyway; so I asked the lady (his EI caseworker, call her V to simplify) if that meant we could rule out Autism since he did well in all other areas, and if there was anything else that would cause him to start using words and stop again; and couldn't really get an answer, kinda "politely" avoided both questions but said that "J" (who will be his speech therapist) has been really great at working w/ kids and making huge improvements w/ a lot of kids, so start there and we'll "keep watching for it" since it's a big red flag that he has words he's used and doesn't anymore; also that he had "unusual" first words, and how autism is a huge range of stuff, but DS has good eye contact, is friendly, studies toys, etc.
Anyway, so I just thought I'd post here and see if anyone else has any opinions or ideas since I'm about driving myself crazy reading one site or book that convinces me he can't be autistic then another that says something else and I'm convinced he must be.
Admitting right off too that I'm mostly ignorant about any of this stuff, so I'm just searching for info and answers and don't intend to offend anyone if I say something stupid. When the possibility of autism was first mentioned to me in fact, my immediate reaction was that "he's never had a vaccine, he can't be autistic".... so when I learned that wasn't necessarily true, then still thought it wasn't possible since he's very social, flirty, loves attention etc... then I read other blogs & posts about parents hating people thinking that about their own kids, so apperantly not true either. And now I just really don't know what to think. (if anything, maybe that mom's bipolar; sure feels like it lately!)

Anyway, on to "about my son". As stated, he's 21 mos, has a vocab of 8 words now: mama, daddy, uh-oh, bye, thank-you (ay-oo), drink (dri or di), love-you (lu-oo or luv-oo). Also, lately Baby, but refering to Everything.
Started thinking autism, when I asked my sitter/neighbor "G" (and my personal fairy godmother of sorts, she was always the person I went to for advice, or company, on bad days, when I was a SAHM) if I should be concerned about him not speaking yet (at that point it was just mama, daddy, bye-bye, and uh-oh, at 19 mos) thinking she'd tell me not too worry, he was too young yet. Instead, she says we should be concerned and she was also concerned about some other things he does, that are similiar to her son (who is autistic, now grown) when he was that age. Incl - spinning wheels on cars, not following directions, generally not interested in toys but wants to follow adults instead of playing w/ toys that are out. (Not that he won't play w/ the toys, he does; just prefers to do what adults are doing.) (All of things that we were just thinking, mostly were typical, and him trying to figure things out - like spinning wheels to see why/how they work)

And then at his first EI apt, V brought it up again, because of him saying words at younger ages then not again. Pretty much every time he learns a new word, he says it for a few days, and then it's gone again. Is that autism, or a part of learning speech, or something else that maybe causes that?
And the bit about "unusual" first words, we hadn't heard before today... his first word was Dog at 10 mos (and definitely used to refer to a dog, he'd point at the dog and say it, on Halloween when all the dogs would start barking at kids, every time, he'd look up from playing and say "dog") ...then ball, rock, golfball, pillow, apple, "go" for mango, ..... but all those words, except dog, for just a few days. (Dog was a couple weeks, then he stopped using it, just recently has started to say "duh-Duh" refering to the dog.)

Other than those two things though, nothing major that stands out. I'm pretty well certain he doesn't have any sensory issues (don't know if that automatically goes w/ the rest or not) .... he'll eat almost anything, play w/ sand, oatmeal, yogurt, etc - he'll ask to have his hands wiped, but then go right back to playing with them. Every once in a while he'll get something on his hands while eating and refuse to eat anymore til they're cleaned but not often.
He did used to spin in tight circles alot but he seems to be outgrowing it, he's done it a couple times this week but only for a couple minutes and a time. And I definitely get the impression he's having fun, not stressed out.
Like we said before, he likes to flip cars over and spin the wheels, but he'll drive them and make car noises too. He also likes anything that spins, any toy or whatever, if there's something on it he can spin, he will. Like the spinning in circles, he used to spin the wheels alot more than he does now, and is more likely to drive the car now.
He gestures a lot when he's talking, "loves to tell stories" is how we put it; I don't so much think I'd describe it as "hand flapping" but I don't really know what that looks like, didn't even know that term existed a few weeks ago.
But we do sometimes have to explain to other kids (at the park, etc) that he's just telling stories, sometimes other kids think he's trying to hit them, or don't know what to make of it.
Physically, he's doing great, and has pretty well always developed on schedule - crawled at 7 mos, walked at 11 mos; he runs, jumps, climbs everything, walks backward, feeds himself & drinks from a cup (w/ messes of course, but hey); ....loves to color and will easily spend an hour or more doing it.

Ok, anyway, I realize I'm rambling; just a bit frustrated that we didn't get a firm answer this morning; if anyone here has any opinions, ideas I'd love to hear them.... Does it sound like autism? Just a speech delay? Any other ideas?
The "wait and see" bit is gonna drive me crazy. Already has over the last couple weeks, and I thought today would be the end of it.
If you've been patient enough to read this far, thank you! Sorry for rambling on!

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#2 of 9 Old 08-29-2008, 08:24 PM
 
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I do see some red flags but your son doesn't sound "blatantly" autistic to me either. I know how frustrating it is to not have answers.

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#3 of 9 Old 08-30-2008, 01:58 PM
 
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I know it's hard not to know. It nearly drove me nuts. I would tell myself my son couldn't be autistic and then at another point I would think maybe he is and started watching and analyzing everything. Don't follow my example!

If he was a bit older I'd tell you to find someone to evaluate. But waiting until he is 2 or 2.5 is probably better. So I don't see any alternative to waiting right now and I know it's hard. EI person couldn't say because legally they can't. They aren't trained to diagnose autism. In my experience when therapists do try to "jump in" on this area they often know no more than the population at large. I heard a lot that my son was too social, too cudly, too friendly, had too good of eye contact, etc. etc....all those myths about autism. So forget about EI helping figure this out. Call around to people who evaluate in your area and ask at what age they are comfortble assessing a mildly affected kid. Ask autism parent groups too who would be good. Then when you find someone make an appointment for whenever your son is that age. Also ask EI when they send kids for a formal autism evaluation. Do it at that age. They should pay for it and that will give you another opinion. I have a feeling your kiddo isn't going to be "cut and dried" in this area. Mine wasn't either.

Then try not to analyze it! If you start seeing lots of autism flags then start floortime...can't hurt if he isn't on the spectrum and it's a good interaction if he is.

As far as what you wrote. Nothing screams autism to me. Dog doesn't strike me as an unusual word. I mean some types of kids pick more social words and others pick nouns. But that isn't autism. My typical kids first word was bu bu (bubble).

While I say nothing screams autism to me, if I had written about my son at certain points and then read it later not knowing it was him I'd probably have written "nothing screams autism to me"! It's hard to know based on a description over the internet. But wanting to do what you do instead of play by himself if I'm picturing that correctly (he wants to "help" you cook/clean/etc.) sounds unautistic to me. In other words, that is typical at that age. Not following directions isn't typical of course. My kiddo (who is on the spectrum) had problems with directions following. It wasn't really that he didn't understand but more that he didn't care to do something just to please me. I would have said he wasn't paying attention to what I was saying back then or maybe he didn't understand. As time went on though I figured out it was more that he wasn't responding and, unlike a typical kid, wasn't bothering to tell me "no" or acknowledge that he heard me and was confused. So it just seemed like he didn't hear me. Really he did; he just didn't like what I was saying. A typical kid who simply was confused would have at least looked at me and possibly tried to do whatever it was or whatever part he did understand. Not following directions is concerning no matter what at this age but it doesn't necessarily mean autism.


Similarly he didn't consistently respond to his name. When a typical child hears his name he'll look up. When Andrew heard his name he just kept doing what he was doing. Did he hear me? Sure. If I said "Andrew" (no looking) "let's go outside" he'd be up to go. If I said "Andrew" (no looking) "it's time to wash up for dinner" he'd just keep playing as if he didn't hear a word. Compare to his brother "Caleb" (looks at me) "it's time to wash up for dinner" Caleb would crinkle his nose and say "no!" or whatever. Did that make any sense? It's the lack of acknowledgment that is the thing with not responding to names.

If I was meeting your son I'd look at his non-verbal use. At this age he should be pointing--both to get things and to show you things. He would be shaking his head to say no, he would be waving, etc. If non-verbals are missing I'd be thinking more autism side of stuff. I'd be watching to see how he does or doesn't look to you to know what to do when he's uncertain. Spectrum kids don't reference other people for information nearly as often as typical kids. Does he respond consistently to his name?


Spend time with other kids his age. Watch how they interact with their caregivers. Does it look a lot different than your son?

Outside of autism yes there is something going on and honestly I'd be more concerned if it isn't autism. Not because he isn't talking more (that is concerning sure) but because his receptive is so far behind too. If autism explains that it is less concerning in my mind (but I'm not scared of autism like I used to be so it's easier for me to say that).

About the numbers though those are too low! What 3 to 6 month old has 8 words?!! I think the test they used is probably the same one they used for us. If a child isn't doing every single thing at a given age level they can't be bumped up to the next age level. So if he was missing one thing at 3 to 6 that is where he is placed. So kids score lower than they really are as a whole. I mention that because when Andrew got a similar score I was upset by how low he scored. Your kiddo is obviously doing things beyond those scores.

You mentioned losing words. Did he ever stop talking completely (I can't remember from earlier posting)? Did he lose any other skills at any point? Does he seem to vary developmentally--sometimes understanding things and then other times not for example? Are his energy levels good? Does he seem healthy? Losing skills is always a big concern for medical stuff. But I'm not sure your child really lost skills as much as maybe was trying out words. Apraxic kids do that, by the way--they can say a word and then you never hear it again. But some other things make me think not apraxia. His understanding should be age appropriate compared to his expressive/talking. And your son is talking and making sounds it sounds like. It's still something maybe you should google (apraxia of speech) and see if it fits what you're seeing. But I think probably not.

I really do understand it's hard not to know. I did that for a long time. The autism diagnosis when we got it (2.5) was actually a relief for me. It was much harder not knowing and thinking maybe/maybe not and if it isn't autism why is he so behind.

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#4 of 9 Old 08-30-2008, 06:11 PM
 
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I totally agree with Sbgrace! I knew that I should be worried about my son's speech delay at 17 months old, but the pedi told me to wait, so I did. I was concentrating so hard on his speech that I didn't realize that his sensory issues were not just a phase, that his receptive speech was really low, and that the only words he did say were nouns to label things, and that he was stimming often.

But since autism has a social component, I was sure he didn't have autism. I mean, how could he when he would climb in my lap and cuddle? When he was capable of smiling (yet, does not have what they call a social smile?). As he gets older, more and more autism traits come pouring out. But it was really really hard to pinpoint it when he was 17 months old. He had a few red flags at 27 months, but didn't even get a diagnosis until his 3rd birthday.
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#5 of 9 Old 08-30-2008, 11:59 PM
 
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Honestly, I agree with the wait and see. If he's autistic, he'll be autistic next year and the next year and the next year, too. If he's not, he won't be. He's not in school yet, so there's no pressing need for him to be "keeping up" with his peers. Wait until he's older to try to know for sure. But meanwhile, keep an open mind... hang out here with the autistic folks. That's my advice, anyway.
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#6 of 9 Old 09-01-2008, 03:00 AM
 
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As I read your post, I swear you were describing my DS. My DS is 30 mos now and was diagnosed at 20 mos with PDD-NOS (ASD). He's been in play therapy twice a week for an hour for 9 mos and since June speech therapy 3x a week for 3hrs a day. The words are starting slowing to return. He is trying desperately to sound out words, but usually can only pull off the first letter or so. (Huh for hug, trrr for train...etc)
My DH doesn't believe in the diagnosis....I'm willing to take it and get him every available resource we can to help him if a diagnosis is what it takes. We both agree that it doesn't harm.
I feel your pain with all the confusion. Just get him all the help available, worry less about what they "call" it. momma hang in there!
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#7 of 9 Old 09-03-2008, 12:53 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks everyone for your replies and advice! I'm still pretty confused, but I guess maybe not completely crazy. Yet anyway.

sbgrace-thanks for your detailed response! lots of great info as I try to sort my way through....


Quote:
Originally Posted by sbgrace View Post
I know it's hard not to know. It nearly drove me nuts. I would tell myself my son couldn't be autistic and then at another point I would think maybe he is and started watching and analyzing everything. Don't follow my example!
Yeah, I already do that. Trying very hard to just enjoy and love my child; but there are days when it's hard not to question what's "normal" and what's not. ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by sbgrace View Post
:EI person couldn't say because legally they can't. They aren't trained to diagnose autism. In my experience when therapists do try to "jump in" on this area they often know no more than the population at large. I heard a lot that my son was too social, too cudly, too friendly, had too good of eye contact, etc. etc....all those myths about autism. So forget about EI helping figure this out. Call around to people who evaluate in your area and ask at what age they are comfortble assessing a mildly affected kid. Ask autism parent groups too who would be good. Then when you find someone make an appointment for whenever your son is that age. Also ask EI when they send kids for a formal autism evaluation. Do it at that age. They should pay for it and that will give you another opinion. I have a feeling your kiddo isn't going to be "cut and dried" in this area. Mine wasn't either.
I was under the impression that this eval was specifically for autism when we did it; but the paperwork doesn't say anything about autism; it's the Battelle Developmental Inventory (the language one was Rosetti). So I will ask about it at our next meeting. I've thought about looking for autism groups too; but wonder if that wouldn't be a bit much / silly if he isn't? And maybe offensive to some of the parents whose kids ARE autistic? It would be a good way to see though, how other kids act, and get a more realistic image of what autism is, right?


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Originally Posted by sbgrace View Post
hile I say nothing screams autism to me, if I had written about my son at certain points and then read it later not knowing it was him I'd probably have written "nothing screams autism to me"! It's hard to know based on a description over the internet.
Yeah, I know; if those of us here around him all the time can't really say for sure, then it's near impossible to say from just a few paragraphs w/out knowing him. I was just frustrated at not getting a yes or no Friday, and nowhere else to go. I really have very little experience with very young kids, and less w/ autistic kids, .... so ....

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:But wanting to do what you do instead of play by himself if I'm picturing that correctly (he wants to "help" you cook/clean/etc.) sounds unautistic to me. In other words, that is typical at that age. Not following directions isn't typical of course. My kiddo (who is on the spectrum) had problems with directions following. It wasn't really that he didn't understand but more that he didn't care to do something just to please me. I would have said he wasn't paying attention to what I was saying back then or maybe he didn't understand. As time went on though I figured out it was more that he wasn't responding and, unlike a typical kid, wasn't bothering to tell me "no" or acknowledge that he heard me and was confused. So it just seemed like he didn't hear me. Really he did; he just didn't like what I was saying. A typical kid who simply was confused would have at least looked at me and possibly tried to do whatever it was or whatever part he did understand. Not following directions is concerning no matter what at this age but it doesn't necessarily mean autism.
Similarly he didn't consistently respond to his name. When a typical child hears his name he'll look up. When Andrew heard his name he just kept doing what he was doing. Did he hear me? Sure. If I said "Andrew" (no looking) "let's go outside" he'd be up to go. If I said "Andrew" (no looking) "it's time to wash up for dinner" he'd just keep playing as if he didn't hear a word. Compare to his brother "Caleb" (looks at me) "it's time to wash up for dinner" Caleb would crinkle his nose and say "no!" or whatever. Did that make any sense? It's the lack of acknowledgment that is the thing with not responding to names.
Yeah, I thought it was pretty normal to want to help cook, clean, etc. Otherwise why all the kitchen playsets, toy brooms, etc, right? I thought the same about spinning things too; why would so many toys have spinning parts if most kids didn't like them? Not to mention the giant spinning wheels at a lot of play areas. He'll also just come sit next to adults (mom & dad on the couch or strangers at the park all the same) and start telling stories... he likes to talk even though not many words.
As far as following directions goes; it does seem like he's ignoring us sometimes, but I also think he's not comprehending things he should be. For example, I can ask him if he wants milk (call his name as many times as we like, makes no difference) and he'll go on with what he's doing, almost seems like he's deaf. (he's not, passed his hearing test w/ flying colors, and responds to all kinds of sounds). But if I get his attention, or get in front of his face and sign milk - he'll get a huge grin on his face and run into the bedroom, often giggling on the way. (we nurse lying in bed the majority of the time, nice & comfy for both of us that way. And I love how much he loves nursing!). Anyway; same thing at bath time, I can ask him 50 times if he wants a bath, or just say bath or bath time, and get no response. But turn the water on and he'll run straight to the tub and try to climb in, clothes and all. (he also loves bath time, and water in general). One more example is bike rides - he loves going for bike rides, but just absolutely no response if we ask him if he wants to go for a ride, or tell him we're going; but let him see his helmet, even for a second, and not go for a ride - huge tantrum.
He definitely knows his name, and has since at least 4 mos old; but will only rarely look at us if we call him. Which we told the guy doing the hearing test; DS looked right at him the first time he was called. Go figure.
He should also know what a cup, spoon, fork, ball etc are but won't pick up or point to any of them when asked. Even if we ask about words he has used, ie, where's the dog (in the room or in a book) he won't point to it. Or look at it, in the room.
Sometimes he's definitely ignoring us, like if we say diaper time / time to change your diaper, with the new diaper in hand. He'll either continue whatever he's doing, or find an excuse to leave the room. (all of a sudden wanting that toy he left in the kitchen for example). No acknowledgement that he heard us though.




Quote:
Originally Posted by sbgrace View Post
f I was meeting your son I'd look at his non-verbal use. At this age he should be pointing--both to get things and to show you things. He would be shaking his head to say no, he would be waving, etc. If non-verbals are missing I'd be thinking more autism side of stuff. I'd be watching to see how he does or doesn't look to you to know what to do when he's uncertain. Spectrum kids don't reference other people for information nearly as often as typical kids. Does he respond consistently to his name?
He does point to stuff - if he wants it, sometimes w/ one finger, sometimes reaching w/ his whole hand. He just last week started pointing to interesting stuff - usually bugs - but whatever it is, he'll point and say "baby".
He waves, doesn't shake his head no but he does nod and say yeah. But not meaning yes in response to a question, just in the middle of a conversation. Stemming from, I believe, our responses to his babytalk..... ie, he's babbling, we respond "yeah", "really", "is that so" type of thing... and he just picked up on the "yeah". But if we ask if he wants something, even know he does, he doesn't nod or say yes / yeah. He just this weekend started to say no if he doesn't like something, still not in response to a question though.
He waves when he says "bye-bye", started that at 16 mos when visiting grandparents.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by sbgrace View Post
:Spend time with other kids his age. Watch how they interact with their caregivers. Does it look a lot different than your son?
no, not really; watching him play at the park, pool etc he seems pretty much like any other toddler there. The only really obvious difference I can point out is that he's more energetic then most. Such as storytimes, when all the other kids seem to be mostly content to sit and listen to the story, DS is up running around in circles. Same thing during warm-ups for his gymnastics class, he's been in the class since 14 mos and does really well for all of it except the warm-up, he wants to run around in circles instead of doing the stretches & stuff. (most of the other younger kids aren't really doing the stretches either but sitting or standing while their parents move them around).
As far as friends go, the couple friends I have w/ kids his age have girls, so it's hard to compare; he's definitely more energetic and less verbal than any of them, but that's mostly to be expected.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sbgrace View Post
utside of autism yes there is something going on and honestly I'd be more concerned if it isn't autism. Not because he isn't talking more (that is concerning sure) but because his receptive is so far behind too. If autism explains that it is less concerning in my mind (but I'm not scared of autism like I used to be so it's easier for me to say that).
yeah, I've wondered if it'd be worse if he was or wasn't autistic; but if just speech and he can catch back up w/ that, since he's still so young, then that would be the best.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sbgrace View Post
:About the numbers though those are too low! What 3 to 6 month old has 8 words?!! I think the test they used is probably the same one they used for us. If a child isn't doing every single thing at a given age level they can't be bumped up to the next age level. So if he was missing one thing at 3 to 6 that is where he is placed. So kids score lower than they really are as a whole. I mention that because when Andrew got a similar score I was upset by how low he scored. Your kiddo is obviously doing things beyond those scores.

You mentioned losing words. Did he ever stop talking completely (I can't remember from earlier posting)? Did he lose any other skills at any point? Does he seem to vary developmentally--sometimes understanding things and then other times not for example? Are his energy levels good? Does he seem healthy? Losing skills is always a big concern for medical stuff. But I'm not sure your child really lost skills as much as maybe was trying out words. Apraxic kids do that, by the way--they can say a word and then you never hear it again. But some other things make me think not apraxia. His understanding should be age appropriate compared to his expressive/talking. And your son is talking and making sounds it sounds like. It's still something maybe you should google (apraxia of speech) and see if it fits what you're seeing. But I think probably not.

I really do understand it's hard not to know. I did that for a long time. The autism diagnosis when we got it (2.5) was actually a relief for me. It was much harder not knowing and thinking maybe/maybe not and if it isn't autism why is he so behind.
Yeah, we said the scores were really low too, he was supposed to get another eval by the clinic that would do his speech therapy, but just found out today that our insurance won't cover it; so back to the free EI therapy but it'll be less often.
Definitely need to look up the apraxia thing too. That sounds a lot like what he's doing, in fact we've said before several times that it's like he's just practicing how to say words then once he's confident that he says them right he's all done w/ that word and "puts it away for later." ....
I don't know whether or not that counts as "loss of speech" which is why it's worded kinda odd in the first post....it's not like he was talking a ton and then went back to just a few words; just that words he's said in the past he now doesn't. (most words he's said not just a couple of them....) But it's always been, whatever new word it is, he says several times either one night or over a few days; then never again. Except baby.... The few words mentioned originally are the ones that have "stuck" .... waiting to see whether no will or not. Other than that, no other skills that he's gained and then lost.
Other than a few colds, he's been very healthy; not even a single ear infection; one stomach bug but it didn't stick around long. Tons of energy. He's never completely stopped talking altogether, he's almost always babbling , to anyone around who will pay attention to him. Once he learned to wave and say Bye-Bye, he never stopped doing that. Never stopped saying Daddy and Mama, although they've gone through various forms but that's how he says them now. Same with Uh-oh.... thank-you he did say at one point earlier, then stop, then start again....

so anyway.... is all of that clear as mud or what??

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#8 of 9 Old 09-03-2008, 01:02 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Honestly, I agree with the wait and see. If he's autistic, he'll be autistic next year and the next year and the next year, too. If he's not, he won't be. He's not in school yet, so there's no pressing need for him to be "keeping up" with his peers. Wait until he's older to try to know for sure. But meanwhile, keep an open mind... hang out here with the autistic folks. That's my advice, anyway.

I know it's probably the only realistic thing to do at this point, it's just hard not knowing. We do definitely plan on unschooling him and hope he'll never feel a need to keep up or compete with peers. I'm having a hard time not getting angry sometimes (what at who knows?) when he does things that 'might' be autistic; of course I'm not angry at him, and try not to show it ..... Just that, as his mother, I want him to have a life free from any difficulties or pain or illness (don't we all? Even if it's not at all realistic); and I just can't do anything about this except maybe wonder what I maybe should've done differently while I was pregnant, or maybe before, or when he was very young. (I know, more crazyness, since noone really knows what causes it).....
Definitely plan to keep reading whatever I can........and any advice anyone here gives me.

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#9 of 9 Old 09-03-2008, 01:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
I know it's probably the only realistic thing to do at this point, it's just hard not knowing. We do definitely plan on unschooling him and hope he'll never feel a need to keep up or compete with peers. I'm having a hard time not getting angry sometimes (what at who knows?) when he does things that 'might' be autistic; of course I'm not angry at him, and try not to show it ..... Just that, as his mother, I want him to have a life free from any difficulties or pain or illness (don't we all? Even if it's not at all realistic); and I just can't do anything about this except maybe wonder what I maybe should've done differently while I was pregnant, or maybe before, or when he was very young. (I know, more crazyness, since noone really knows what causes it).....
Definitely plan to keep reading whatever I can........and any advice anyone here gives me.
Well, one bit of advice I would give you is not to think of autism as a difficulty or pain or illness. Being autistic is great! Just different. You don't need to do anything about it, except love him and accept him exactly as he is---autistic, neurotypical, or other.
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