Homebirth and twins - Mothering Forums

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Old 07-09-2009, 03:54 PM - Thread Starter
 
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When I found out I was having twins, I had mixed feelings, I was really looking forward to a homebirth and doing it my way. It took me a while, especially since we were moving half way through my pregnancy, to find a midwife who would deliver twins at home. It was such an ordeal and I was so stressed throughout the entire pregnancy, wondering how it was going to turn out. I was intent on doing my pregnancy as natural as possible, and only had a couple of ultrasounds done during the first two trimesters.

My husband was skeptical, and unsettled about the idea of a homebirth, but he supported me in what I wanted to do. This was my fourth pregnancy, so I knew what to expect. My midwife was very relaxed and calm about the whole thing, and gave me a sense of peace, which I did have for a couple of months in the last trimester. At 36 weeks, I had an ultrasound, my husband insisted, and it was bad news...the twin at the bottom was breech, and the other was transverse. I wasn't really too concerned, as my midwife was willing to deliver breech, she had a lot of experience. My husband was not comfortable, but he still supported me if I was comfortable. After talking with another midwife, that delivered our first baby, she was not comfortable with the positioning we described. My midwife that was currently taking care of my pregnancy, was willing to proceed, but only if I was comfortable. After thinking it over, I decided a better option was to see a doctor that was willing to deliver breech.

I did feel some relief from that decision because it is scary to think of the possibilities when it comes to twins. I was upset because it was not what I wanted to do. With twins it is required to deliver in the operating room, and I was not comfortable with that. I went all the way to 39 weeks, with no sign of labor. I was carrying my twins very high and to the front. I was very uncomfortable, and frustrated. At my visit at 39 weeks, nothing was happening, I wasn't dialating, no contractions, nothing. I asked the doctor who had 30 years of experience, and delivered multiples frequently, if he thought another week would change. He said, probably not, they were not engaged in my pelvic area, and they were not in position. I immediately said, when can we do the C-section? My husband was shocked at my change. But I can tell you, I was at my wits end. With 3 young children at home, and 39 weeks with twins...I could barely walk, sleep or stand.

We scheduled the C-section for the next day at 5pm....it seemed like an eternity. I agonized over my decision all the way up to the moment it happened. I struggled to think that maybe it could happen on its own if I just waited...
Right before the surgery, I asked him to do an ultrasound to see if there was a change, it actually got worse. It went from bottom down to feet first. And they were nowhere near a point of exit.

So, I had a C-section. My twin girls were 7lbs 10oz., and 7lbs. 3oz., identical twin girls with one placenta. Starting from a homebirth all the way to a medical delivery...the polar opposite of what I wanted. I still struggle to this day with that outcome. I have come to realize that it was the right decision, because I felt that they were ready to come out at 38 weeks. I was having weird pain, very light, almost like my body was trying to go into labor, but there was no pressure on my cervix. Also, we did not know they were sharing a placenta, it could have been very bad during a vaginal birth for that placenta to detach while we wait for the cord to stop pulsating from the first delivery.

So, while a homebirth is possible with twins, follow your instincts, a mother knows. We will doubt our decisions, but our instincts never lie. It turns out, a C-section did not change the kind of mother I am to my kids...it allowed me to have a safe delivery.

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Old 07-09-2009, 08:30 PM
 
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Welcome to MDC and thank you for sharing your story.

I took particular interest in these comments of yours:

Quote:
Originally Posted by melanienader View Post
Also, we did not know they were sharing a placenta, it could have been very bad during a vaginal birth for that placenta to detach while we wait for the cord to stop pulsating from the first delivery.

So, while a homebirth is possible with twins, follow your instincts, a mother knows. We will doubt our decisions, but our instincts never lie. It turns out, a C-section did not change the kind of mother I am to my kids...it allowed me to have a safe delivery.
Do you have any research citations to clarify just how realistic a concern this is in a mono-di twin birth? Although this concern was mentioned by our doctor, it seemed theoretical as I couldn't find any stats behind it.

Without some impartial scientific reference, this purported fear sounds a bit to me like saying a baby could have been born brain-damaged because the cord was around the neck and wasn't it a good thing that a c-section was done. (As many mamas here likely know, a possibility doesn't make something a probability. . . something like 30% of babies born with cord wrapping?)

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Old 07-09-2009, 08:47 PM
 
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Welcome to MDC, mama. Tell us more about you, as I'm guessing there is a lot more to your life than the birth itself.....
I have to admit that Novella struck a cord w/me about cords around the neck, as that is how my Sierra entered the world. And brain damage? Maybe the reverse. She asked for a diaper yesterday to pee on when she was standing on our bed naked and needed to pee. Today she pushed her way up to me to do the handclap, "down, down baby" that I was teaching to her five year old sister. Whew!!! Sorry to hijack, but just wanted to say that cords around the neck are very normal, and in our case, presented no problem, just a very fast birth..... BTW, Sierra is 14 months old., and oh yeah, climbed to the top of the big slide the other day!
I am a big believer in intuition, and that is what I trusted with our homebirth. I think that every mama needs to find that safe place to birth. I'm wondering how old your girls are now??? What are your daily challenges/joys? Looking forward to hearing more from you. Welcome.
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Old 07-09-2009, 10:02 PM
 
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Welcome to the multiples forum!

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Originally Posted by melanienader View Post
Also, we did not know they were sharing a placenta, it could have been very bad during a vaginal birth for that placenta to detach while we wait for the cord to stop pulsating from the first delivery.
In all of my research, I actually never came across anything revealing a higher risk of placental abruption during birthing mono/di twins and specifically in between the two births, as you mentioned. Like Novella, I'm interested in any studies you can reference. It seems that mono/di twin pregnancy and birth has a lot of unknowns, and most of us mamas who had mono/di twins are interested in learning more about the topic. It helps us to help future MoMs, too!


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I have to admit that Novella struck a cord w/me about cords around the neck, as that is how my Sierra entered the world.
I just have to ask... pun intended?

Mama to twin girls Adele and Nadia, born 5/2008
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Old 07-09-2009, 10:05 PM
 
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Ironically, I did give birth at home to a feet first Baby A. We had to wait for 39 weeks ourselves and she did not engage into my pelvis until I was in active labor.

So, you never know what might have happened had you continued in your home birth plans. I am glad you feel confident in your choices though.
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Old 07-09-2009, 11:58 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Okay, where to start;
Well, I have no scientific research, only the advice of an experienced doctor very familiar with multiples delivery. I asked him multiple times if he would allow the cord to stop pulsating before cutting it and he insisted it would put the other twin in danger of the placenta possibly separating while she was inside. Now, I am a very crunchy, if you will person...down to the detail, sometimes to the point of overkill, but when it comes to the point of taking a risk like this...there are no guarantees and I have to draw the line. I couldn't predict the future, and yes I will do natural as much as possible, but our brains are also given to us to use. We have to weigh the benefits vs. the risk, and I had to do so this time. I hate to say it, but there is a time and a place for medical intervention, although it is very seldom.
In the end, I did have to accept the outcome, and even with the previous post by Intertwined, where you had a similar situation with a different outcome...not sure how big your babies were, but that was an issue with me...I am fairly petite, people were horrified, that's how big I was...I just don't know if I had enough room for them to get to where they needed to be to come out. I would hope that nature would do the work, but it's not always the case...women and babies did die before there was medical intervention. I will never know, if only we could see where two paths will lead us...that would be great.

My real goal is to encourage moms to be to go with their instincts, because they are strong. In the past, I feel that I have doubted my instincts and regretted it in the end, this time I went with my instincts even though it was not what I wanted. The strongest evidence I have that I made the right decision, is that I really felt that my body was trying to go into labor that entire 38th week.

I look forward to learning and sharing more here, especially in the multiples section...
Take care.

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Old 07-10-2009, 12:10 AM - Thread Starter
 
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To respond to mamaeliz questions:

My twins are now 22 months, I have 3 older kids, 8, 6 and 4. I am very passionate about nutrition and living naturally, to the point of driving my husband crazy at times. I love to quilt, do organic gardening, and am looking forward to the day when my husband retires from the Marine Corp so I can have my huge plot of land somewhere and settle for good. I love to make things, and do things myself. I always look at things and think, "I can do that myself, even better!" I also homeschool my older two, and really enjoy it, although it can be a challenge to balance everything, in particular my home-based company. I had to hire help for the mornings because I just couldn't home school my kids once the babies started taking one nap a day.

I would say right now, my biggest challenge from day to day is the distension of the twins with each other. They always want what the other has, and they are the most spoiled toddlers I have ever had. The older kids give them whatever they want to keep them quiet, and I have never had to deal with temper tantrums in any of my kids the way I do with them now. I am fearful of the terrible twos, which I have somehow avoided to this point with my other three. Maybe this is more common of twin behavior...I don't know. I just know that twins is new territory for me!

On the other hand, I have never enjoyed my toddlers as much as I am enjoying these two. I treasure every moment I have with them, especially at bedtime when I spend exclusive time with them doing story and playtime. I love how they interact, and they have learned very early to be gentle with each other, notwithstanding occasional hairpulling. But for the most part, they are good to each other. It is so precious when they spontaneously hug and kiss each other. Twins is a great cherry on top for my journey in motherhood (because they did me in and we are done!) lol

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Old 07-10-2009, 01:03 AM
 
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Okay, where to start;
Well, I have no scientific research, only the advice of an experienced doctor very familiar with multiples delivery. I asked him multiple times if he would allow the cord to stop pulsating before cutting it and he insisted it would put the other twin in danger of the placenta possibly separating while she was inside. Now, I am a very crunchy, if you will person...down to the detail, sometimes to the point of overkill, but when it comes to the point of taking a risk like this...there are no guarantees and I have to draw the line. I couldn't predict the future, and yes I will do natural as much as possible, but our brains are also given to us to use. We have to weigh the benefits vs. the risk, and I had to do so this time. I hate to say it, but there is a time and a place for medical intervention, although it is very seldom.
I am still scratching my head at this doctor's assertion. I have found studies which show an increased risk for placental abruption during pregnancy in twins vs singleton pregnancies, but I found nothing that discusses risk of abruption during birth of mono/di babies.

I wonder if this doctor had his facts straight, or if he was describing acute TTTS (twin to twin transfusion syndrome) during labor, which is a known risk that one can find in the scientific literature. Acute onset TTTS during birth can result in anemia / polycythemia in the babes or even death. Thankfully, acute onset TTTS during birth is rare even in mono/di twins. And it's interesting, b/c from what I can gather, the OBs who are the 'TTTS experts' may now be asserting that it is preferable to delay cord clamping in mono/di births over the common practice of immediate clamping - anyone know more about this??? PurpleHeather? DoolaYuma?

I do agree with you that we need to use both our instincts and our brains. Your choice was likely the best for you, and that is what matters most in the end. Please realize, though, that your assertion that your doctor's words are absolute and the implication that medical intervention is necessary for all mono/di births will not sit well with many of us on this board who chose different paths which resulted in equally good outcomes. Let's keep this to the thoughtful discussion that it can be.

Mama to twin girls Adele and Nadia, born 5/2008
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Old 07-10-2009, 08:57 AM
 
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i home school too Melanie with children 9,8,7,4.75 and 00 - it is a constant juggling act. i quit working from home just before the twins were conceived

the thing that gets me about birth is that if anyone picks the natural route and it goes 'wrong' they are blamed and told you so'd, but if you go surgical route the outcome is always praised as they did 'everything' they could.

this was on my mind a lot with my twins births as they presented as an oblique breech and breech, but twin 1 shifted during the very brief labour to breech so he could come out vaginally. they wanted me to go for a section birth from when i was admitted to the hospital. if anything had gone wrong, i would never have heard the end of it, but if i'd opted for the section and anything had gone wrong (and we know how very many complications can present from surgery) it would have been fine by everyone because they 'did their best'

anyway, mine were both breech at 32 weeks, so were tiny compared to Intertwined's beauty's but i don't regret my decision for a moment and would very likely have made the same choices at full term.

i found this the most stressful aspect of multiple pregnancy. we're so vulnerable and statistics at the end of the day mean nothing when we have to live with what actually happens

joy.gifspread a lot of love joy.gif

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Old 07-10-2009, 12:54 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you shukr, for your words...believe me, I would never believe that a medical intervention is necessary until it comes to life and death...I don't think anyone would deny medical services when they think their child's life is in danger...not that I am assuming my twins life were in danger. I just could not take the chance in my case. I do think that it was hard to think straight given how uncomfortable I was, and I am pretty tolerant of pain. There is no way to know what may have happened if I had waited, with twins, it is not as common and most of the people I knew at the time were very unsupportive of a home birth, I really had to deal with all the decisions with the little information I could find.

I can agree also that an experienced doctor, may have that as a downfall, if he is unable to accept any new findings, or even willing to do things differently. I think I may have done better if I had found a supportive group such as this at that time to bounce ideas off. I am glad to be here, and have some support.

You ladies are great, thanks for all your feedback. Some of you definitely make me question my decision, but still going back to what I was going through at the time, I don't know how I could have made a different decision.

Take care

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Old 07-10-2009, 04:24 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
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Please realize, though, that your assertion that your doctor's words are absolute and the implication that medical intervention is necessary for all mono/di births will not sit well with many of us on this board who chose different paths which resulted in equally good outcomes. Let's keep this to the thoughtful discussion that it can be.
I never said or implied that this is the way anyone should go, I absolutely hated that I had to go through it...I am simply trying to say follow your instincts and don't hate yourself forever if you go against what you truly want. I still struggle to this day, but I have to have peace and accept that I did my best with what I had.

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Old 07-10-2009, 05:31 PM
 
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i think what some of us trying to say is that the moms here have a wide variety of twin birth experiences. we have moms who are NICU veterans and learned the hard way how to meld high medical intervention with AP/NFL ideals after giving birth at 29 weeks. we have moms who gave birth to their twins at 40-42+ weeks. we have moms who had unmedicated, in hospital OB-attended births. we have moms who had scheduled c-sections for many different reasons. we have moms who had double breech homebirths. we have moms who risked out of homebirth or who transfered in labor to a hospital for a c-section. we have moms who birthed one baby at home and transfered to the hospital for the other baby's birth. there are so many different ways multiple birth plays out in the end and many factors that are beyond a mother's control that play a role.

given those varied experiences, we try to support multiple moms to be with resources and documented information when possible so they can evaluate for themselves in an informed manner through the lens of their situation. it is an unfortunate fact that there are care providers who recommend courses of action without medical indication sometimes. when you're expecting multiples that can sometimes increase how often that happens. as a doula, i heard two different OBs at two different hospitals tell two different moms that they had to cut their baby's cord right away because if the baby was higher than the mom right after birth the baby would lose blood and become anemic and if the baby was lower, it would get too much blood and be jaundiced. neither doc could back that statement up with any documentation whatsoever. most likely a supervising OB had told them that when they were residents years and years ago and they just never questioned it.

i don't think the other moms here are trying to make you feel bad about your birth experience. you made the best decisions you could in the situation you found yourself in at the time for the health and safety of you and your babies. that's all anyone can do.

i think that the concerns are just that should a mom of pregnant with mo-di twins read this thread, to be sure she reads that there is no current documentation/research to support the idea expressed by some OBs that there is a significant risk of palcental abruption between the birth of Baby A and Baby B.

i'm sorry you felt upset. I too have lingering what ifs about my own twin birth experience. Not fun feelings.

Crunchy Mama to the Triad of Chaos-- DD1 (9/03) & the Twinadoes- DS and DD2 (6/06)
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Old 07-10-2009, 06:17 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I think my negative feelings are the feeling I have for myself because I had a hard time accepting what happened, and especially that I couldn't control it like my other 3 births. I appreciate your words, and you bring a good point, not all OBs have the research to back their opinions, and I think if it had been a singleton, I would have been much more confident in my ability. It is scary when you are faced with a decision of uncertainty. I think the fact is that I am still trying to get past my feelings of that decision.

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Old 07-10-2009, 06:28 PM
 
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well my twins are 3yo now and i still struggle with some events of their birth and some of my decisions, so i understand. hopefully, we'll both find the peace we're looking for at some point!

Crunchy Mama to the Triad of Chaos-- DD1 (9/03) & the Twinadoes- DS and DD2 (6/06)
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Old 07-11-2009, 01:07 AM
 
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i think that the concerns are just that should a mom of pregnant with mo-di twins read this thread, to be sure she reads that there is no current documentation/research to support the idea expressed by some OBs that there is a significant risk of palcental abruption between the birth of Baby A and Baby B.
Thank you!

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Old 07-11-2009, 02:16 AM
 
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Welcome! It's unfortunate that your doctor was not more supportive of a vaginal birth. Mono/di twins don't have to be born by cesarean most of the time. If you look at the risks of acute TTTS (which I believe is what your OB was concerned about) it's still relatively rare. The cord clamping of Baby B is done immediately after the birth of Baby A to prevent blood flow back through the shared connections in the (mono/di) placenta. As far as I know, immediate cord clamping is still the recommendation. I have 2 sets of mono/di twins. First set were born at home (just over 39 weeks and 7.6 lbs each) with acute TTTS and no complications. Second set was a planned homebirth that ended in an emergency cesarean under general anesthesia for complications from TTTS again. Guess I'm proof that it can go either way, right? Sounds like you are a busy mama too and we have a lot in common. I'm homeschooling my 6 children (6, 5, 3, 3, 10 mos & 10 mos.) My husband is in the Army (single parenting sucks!) and I have a home-based business too. I wish I could say I'm gardening too but I can only dream about that at the moment.

Heather, Army wife & Mama to M (10), J (9), L & S (my HBAC babies are 7!), N & R (5), and A (born 11/30/12 UBA2C)
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Old 07-11-2009, 03:15 AM
 
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Welcome again, oh fellow organic gardener!
Although, I am at this time, an organic gardener of mostly almost dead produce.... Ah, the joys of trying to juggle parenting and gardening......
Welcome to you, and thanks for sharing your birth experience. Birthing is so loaded in so many ways, and I think that there is always a lot of energy to share around it. I will forever be debriefing about DD1's birth, and need to be very careful in how I openly discuss it, as she is starting to ask questions as to why she needed to be born in a hospital.......
And yes, kjoy, I was trying to make a pun with "striking a chord", but I put "cord" which is the wrong word, and am such a word geek that I had to note this. I guess not geek enough, though, to go through changing it. ha ha.
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Old 07-11-2009, 11:47 AM
 
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Thank you, Melanie, for engaging in convo about what we know to be true in mono/di births. I am genuinely always interested in learning more b/c I found it hard to make wise birthing choices due to the seeming VOID of good information available re: mono/di pregnancy and birth. It is SO HARD to know what to do. I can't imagine having 3 other kids to take care of while pregnant with twins, either. Whew! I think that you followed your instincts, and that counts for a lot; it resulted in beautiful babes, no? I hope that you find peace in time. You seem to me like a busy, busy mama who is doing hard work to make good choices for her family!

1stTimeMommy, thank you for explaining the concern re: future mono/di moms and info, which is also a big passion of mine - making sure that moms who come here are able to learn, question, etc.

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The cord clamping of Baby B is done immediately after the birth of Baby A to prevent blood flow back through the shared connections in the (mono/di) placenta. As far as I know, immediate cord clamping is still the recommendation.
Heather, I'm confused by the baby labels...

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Old 07-11-2009, 05:03 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I do wish I had been involved here more when I was pregnant and struggling with the decision. I was so torn apart to go to the absolute opposite side of where I imagined it to be. I do question everything, but with twins, I was in new territory and didn't know where to go. It also didn't help that I had a midwife that I trusted also agreeing with the doctor, but I don't think she was very experienced with twins. The bottom line is my babies were healthy and strong...but I have to get past the awful part of not getting to hold them for over an hour....that was absolutely torturous! I barely even got to see them as they delivered them. All I saw was baby B, Abigail, being laid down on the warming table and her mouth forced open and something going down her throat...then it seemed like the room was empty so fast and I was left like a peice of meat forever it seemed to be sewn up....If only I could turn back time...I would let another week go by and just let them do the fetal stress test to make sure the babies were doing fine, which is what my concern was. Well, thank you for listening as I ramble on...and thank you for all of your words.

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Old 07-11-2009, 10:57 PM
 
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I do also want to add for other pregnant mothers carrying twins that (should you choose to have a vaginal exam) just because you may not be showing any cervical change late into your pregnancy, does not mean that you won't go into labor. Cervical change can be very misleading and does not mean much of anything. A care provider cannot know when you will have your baby or how long you will carry your twins for.

Unfortunately, even care providers with many years of experience might not have many years of experience where medical intervention is not a part of the birth.

Melanie,

This isn't meant to sound judgy at all. I didn't have a footling breech presenting baby, and I wasn't in the same posistion you were faced with. I can't imagine how difficult it must have been to go through a c-section and be handed twins at the same time. It would be overwhelming!

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Old 07-11-2009, 11:34 PM
 
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...but I have to get past the awful part of not getting to hold them for over an hour....that was absolutely torturous! I barely even got to see them as they delivered them. All I saw was baby B, Abigail, being laid down on the warming table and her mouth forced open and something going down her throat...then it seemed like the room was empty so fast and I was left like a peice of meat forever it seemed to be sewn up...

No mother should be treated like that. I'm sorry they weren't more humane with you and your babies during the birth.

Mama to twin girls Adele and Nadia, born 5/2008
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Old 07-13-2009, 10:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by 1stTimeMummytoLore View Post

i think that the concerns are just that should a mom of pregnant with mo-di twins read this thread, to be sure she reads that there is no current documentation/research to support the idea expressed by some OBs that there is a significant risk of palcental abruption between the birth of Baby A and Baby B.
That's me! Thank you.

Bean : Mama to DSs and (& :, 4 goats & 7 ) and two fraternal twin BOYS 9-19-09 (+ 1 daytime boy)
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Old 07-13-2009, 01:38 PM
 
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Baby A and B are just labels used to keep track of the babies in utereo and then during birth. I think they try to wait to label them until they're big enough that their position is established so that baby A is most likely to be born first, but I do know of a few situations where that turned out not to be the case.

In a hospital setting it can be very important, especially if there are anticipated problems, each baby or the baby anticipated to have the most problems might have their own team on standby.

It's also helpful for keeping medical records straight, and for any placenta pathology reports (standard with suspicion of TTTS, so that they can map where the A to B connections are). I don't think you automatically have to have the thorough placenta check done even if you give birth at a hospital, but we requested that it be done and the research form from the TTTS foundation be used and the report sent to them as well, for their ongoing research project.
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Old 07-15-2009, 02:11 PM
 
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I didn't get the read all of the replies, but did read your story.

I found out we were pregnant with our fourth and called up my midwives. They were free, two weeks later they inform me that they have to close their practice due to the econony.

I found a different midwife that I like, not love but she is nice.

We decided for an ultrasound at 16 weeks to make sure of my dates as my mom will have to fly here from the US. We found out at the sonogram that we were 17 weeks with twins. Shocked, but fine we went home and figured out how to fit two more children into our three bedroom house.

6 days later my midwife comes for a visit and informs us that she is not expirenced with twin births and the closest midwife that could maybe come is 1.5 hours away. Meanwhile my babies would probably already be here and she does not feel qualified to handle it alone. At least she is being honest right.

So, I went from baby #4 being delivered at home into the loving arms of his/her family to #4 & #5 being delivered in an OR with a bunch of doctors and nurses and a white serile environment!! YUCK!!

I don't even get to make it to delivery to see if they are head down or otherwise.

I am just sick about this. I do not want to see a doctor I do not want an epi line placed "just in case" and I do not want to deliver in an OR!! AHHHHHHHHH!!
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Old 07-16-2009, 02:53 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I am just sick about this. I do not want to see a doctor I do not want an epi line placed "just in case" and I do not want to deliver in an OR!! AHHHHHHHHH!!
I understand your frustration, for me I was just totally stressed out most of the pregnancy wondering what was going to happen in the end, imagining and anticipating the worst. I think some of the stories in the post are worth reading, especially the brave mamas that did not go to the OR, and refused to deliver there. Not ideal like being at home, but it can still be natural. I wish you the best! Maybe you can keep looking and find something closer? I didn't find my homebirth midwife right away, it took a little digging.

Melanie Nader
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Old 07-19-2009, 09:12 PM
 
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I'm not a mom of twins, so you can ignore what I say . I had a cesarean after 4 vaginal births. I was supposed to have another homebirth. Everything was going fine, until I got his pain in my upper belly. I couldnt sleep, it was so bad. So, I went to the ER at 4am, thinking I had bad gas or something After lab work and whatnot, I was diagnosed with HELLP syndrome. My son was born at 10am-6 hours after heading to the ER-at 33 weeks, by cesarean. My then husband wasnt even there for the delivery.

Now, heres the thing-I was given the option to attempt an induction. I was given the facts-I had had 4 other babies, so induction would probably go well, BUT at the same time, my cervix was tight, closed, and thick, presenting more of a challenge there. I had been up all night and been put on mag sulfate, which makes you feel so....bleh. I was still having pain in my belly, although not so bad. I was so, so tired. And, when my labs were repeated 2 hours after the first set, my liver had gotten worse, my kidneys were now failing, and my platelet count had dropped signficantly. In other words, the support they were giving wasnt helping. The good news was, my son looked great on ultrasound. So...it was up to me. Try to induce with my labs getting worse, risking it not working, or being too exhausted to push. Or, opt for a cesarean.

I decided on the cesarean. Why? Because if the induction didnt work, my platelets would have been too low for me to be awake for the cesarean. As it turned out, I really wouldve preferred being knocked out and if I ever have another one, I will be. But I didnt know that at the time. So, I look back and think *what if?* I mean, the recovery for me was terrible, even without a baby to take care of. I hated it. But...well...theres really nothing I can change. Whats done is done. All I can do is look forward to this baby and hope for a HBAC.

Cari-mama to Eriq, Lile, Paikea, Kaidyn, and Mieke is here!! 2/9/10
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Old 07-24-2009, 03:52 AM
 
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This thread is titled "homebirth and twins" and it caught my attention.

I had a HB with my breech twins, one also a footling. I went over 40 weeks and my twins were huge. There were complications but my midwives and we responded well and wisely to them.

I know in my heart things would have gone differently had we gone the hosptial route or transferred. We trusted our instincts and I completely agree with the OP that mothers, and father's, must trust their instincts!

to the OP. Congrats on your twins!
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